32 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Adele Abrahamsen [23]Adele A. Abrahamsen [5]A. A. Abrahamsen [3]A. Abrahamsen [1]
  1. Dynamic Mechanistic Explanation: Computational Modeling of Circadian Rhythms as an Exemplar for Cognitive Science.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):321-333.
    Two widely accepted assumptions within cognitive science are that (1) the goal is to understand the mechanisms responsible for cognitive performances and (2) computational modeling is a major tool for understanding these mechanisms. The particular approaches to computational modeling adopted in cognitive science, moreover, have significantly affected the way in which cognitive mechanisms are understood. Unable to employ some of the more common methods for conducting research on mechanisms, cognitive scientists’ guiding ideas about mechanism have developed in conjunction with their (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   32 citations  
  2. In Search of Mitochondrial Mechanisms: Interfield Excursions Between Cell Biology and Biochemistry.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (1):1-33.
    Developing models of biological mechanisms, such as those involved in respiration in cells, often requires collaborative effort drawing upon techniques developed and information generated in different disciplines. Biochemists in the early decades of the 20th century uncovered all but the most elusive chemical operations involved in cellular respiration, but were unable to align the reaction pathways with particular structures in the cell. During the period 1940-1965 cell biology was emerging as a new discipline and made distinctive contributions to understanding the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. Thinking Dynamically About Biological Mechanisms: Networks of Coupled Oscillators. [REVIEW]William Bechtel & Adele A. Abrahamsen - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (4):707-723.
    Explaining the complex dynamics exhibited in many biological mechanisms requires extending the recent philosophical treatment of mechanisms that emphasizes sequences of operations. To understand how nonsequentially organized mechanisms will behave, scientists often advance what we call dynamic mechanistic explanations. These begin with a decomposition of the mechanism into component parts and operations, using a variety of laboratory-based strategies. Crucially, the mechanism is then recomposed by means of computational models in which variables or terms in differential equations correspond to properties of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  4.  8
    Explanation: A Mechanist Alternative.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (2):421-441.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  5.  1
    Explanation: A Mechanist Alternative.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (2):421-441.
    Explanations in the life sciences frequently involve presenting a model of the mechanism taken to be responsible for a given phenomenon. Such explanations depart in numerous ways from nomological explanations commonly presented in philosophy of science. This paper focuses on three sorts of differences. First, scientists who develop mechanistic explanations are not limited to linguistic representations and logical inference; they frequently employ diagrams to characterize mechanisms and simulations to reason about them. Thus, the epistemic resources for presenting mechanistic explanations are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  6. Explanation: A Mechanist Alternative.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (2):421-441.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  7. Connectionism and the Mind.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 1991 - Wiley-Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  8. Complex Biological Mechanisms: Cyclic, Oscillatory, and Autonomous.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - unknown
    The mechanistic perspective has dominated biological disciplines such as biochemistry, physiology, cell and molecular biology, and neuroscience, especially during the 20th century. The primary strategy is reductionist: organisms are to be decomposed into component parts and operations at multiple levels. Researchers adopting this perspective have generated an enormous body of information about the mechanisms of life at scales ranging from the whole organism down to genetic and other molecular operations.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  9. Decomposing, Recomposing, and Situating Circadian Mechanisms: Three Tasks in Developing Mechanistic Explanations.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2009 - In H. Leitgeb & A. Hieke (eds.), Reduction: Between the Mind and the Brain. Ontos. pp. 12--177.
  10. From Reduction Back to Higher Levels.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 559--564.
  11.  50
    Why Do Biologists Use So Many Diagrams?Benjamin Sheredos, Daniel Burnston, Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (5):931-944.
    Diagrams have distinctive characteristics that make them an effective medium for communicating research findings, but they are even more impressive as tools for scientific reasoning. Focusing on circadian rhythm research in biology to explore these roles, we examine diagrammatic formats that have been devised to identify and illuminate circadian phenomena and to develop and modify mechanistic explanations of these phenomena.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12. Mental Mechanisms, Autonomous Systems, and Moral Agency.William Bechtel & A. Abrahamsen - manuscript
    Mechanistic explanations of cognitive activities are ubiquitous in cognitive science. Humanist critics often object that mechanistic accounts of the mind are incapable of accounting for the moral agency exhibited by humans. We counter this objection by offering a sketch of how the mechanistic perspective can accommodate moral agency. We ground our argument in the requirement that biological systems be active in order to maintain themselves in nonequilibrium conditions. We discuss such consequences as a role for mental mechanisms in controlling active (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  23
    Scientists’ Use of Diagrams in Developing Mechanistic Explanations: A Case Study From Chronobiology.Daniel C. Burnston, Benjamin Sheredos, Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (2):224-243.
  14. From Reactive to Endogenously Active Dynamical Conceptions of the Brain.Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel - unknown
    We contrast reactive and endogenously active perspectives on brain activity. Both have been pursued continuously in neurophysiology laboratories since the early 20thcentury, but the endogenous perspective has received relatively little attention until recently. One of the many successes of the reactive perspective was the identification, in the second half of the 20th century, of the distinctive contributions of different brain regions involved in visual processing. The recent prominence of the endogenous perspective is due to new findings of ongoing oscillatory activity (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Phenomena and Mechanisms: Putting the Symbolic, Connectionist, and Dynamical Systems Debate in Broader Perspective.Adele A. Abrahamsen & William P. Bechtel - 2006 - In R. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Blackwell.
    Cognitive science is, more than anything else, a pursuit of cognitive mechanisms. To make headway towards a mechanistic account of any particular cognitive phenomenon, a researcher must choose among the many architectures available to guide and constrain the account. It is thus fitting that this volume on contemporary debates in cognitive science includes two issues of architecture, each articulated in the 1980s but still unresolved: " • Just how modular is the mind? – a debate initially pitting encapsulated mechanisms against (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16. Understanding the Brain as an Endogenously Active Mechanism.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - unknown
    Although a reactive framework has long been dominant in cognitive science and neuroscience, an alternative framework emphasizing dynamics and endogenous activity has recently gained prominence. We review some of the evidence for endogenous activity and consider the implications not only for understanding cognition but also for accounts of explanation offered by philosophers of science. Our recent characterization of dynamic mechanistic explanation emphasizes the coordination of accounts of mechanisms that identify parts and operations with computational models of their activity. These can, (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Connectionism and the Mind: Parallel Processing, Dynamics, and Evolution in Networks.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2002 - Wiley-Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  18.  26
    Diagrams as Tools for Scientific Reasoning.Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel - 2015 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (1):117-131.
    We contend that diagrams are tools not only for communication but also for supporting the reasoning of biologists. In the mechanistic research that is characteristic of biology, diagrams delineate the phenomenon to be explained, display explanatory relations, and show the organized parts and operations of the mechanism proposed as responsible for the phenomenon. Both phenomenon diagrams and explanatory relations diagrams, employing graphs or other formats, facilitate applying visual processing to the detection of relevant patterns. Mechanism diagrams guide reasoning about how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  75
    Bridging Boundaries Versus Breaking Boundaries: Psycholinguistics in Perspective.Adele A. Abrahamsen - 1987 - Synthese 72 (3):355 - 388.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  20. Mechanistic Explanation and the Nature-Nurture Controversy.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2005 - Bulletin d'Histoire Et d'pistmologie Des Sciences de La Vie 12:75-100.
    Both in biology and psychology there has been a tendency on the part of many investigators to focus solely on the mature organism and ignore development. There are many reasons for this, but an important one is that the explanatory framework often invoked in the life sciences for understanding a given phenomenon, according to which explanation consists in identifying the mechanism that produces that phenomenon, both makes it possible to side-step the development issue and to provide inadequate resources for actually (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  17
    Explaining Human Freedom and Dignity Mechanistically: From Receptive to Active Mechanisms.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:43-66.
    Mechanistic explanation is the dominant approach to explanation in the life sciences, but it has been challenged as incompatible with a conception of humans as agents whose capacity for self-direction endows them with freedom and dignity. We argue that the mechanical philosophy, properly construed, has sufficient resources to explain how such characteristics can arise in a material world. Biological mechanisms must be regarded as active, not only reactive, and as organized so as to maintain themselves far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Notions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  13
    Diagrams as Vehicles for Scientific Reasoning.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - unknown
    We argue that diagrams are not just a communicative tool but play important roles in the reasoning of biologists: in characterizing the phenomenon to be explained, identifying explanatory relations, and developing an account of the responsible mechanism. In the first two tasks diagrams facilitate applying visual processing to the detection of patterns that constitute phenomena or explanatory relations. Diagrams of a mechanism serve to guide reasoning about what parts and operations are needed and how potential parts of the mechanism are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  48
    Connectionism and the Future of Folk Psychology.William P. Bechtel & Adele A. Abrahamsen - 1992 - In Robert G. Burton (ed.), Minds: Natural and Artificial. SUNY Press.
  24.  24
    Explaining Human Freedom and Dignity Mechanistically.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:43-66.
    Mechanistic explanation is the dominant approach to explanation in the life sciences, but it has been challenged as incompatible with a conception of humans as agents whose capacity for self-direction endows them with freedom and dignity. We argue that the mechanical philosophy, properly construed, has sufficient resources to explain how such characteristics can arise in a material world. Biological mechanisms must be regarded as active, not only reactive, and as organized so as to maintain themselves far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Notions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  7
    History and Core Themes.Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel - 2012 - In Keith Frankish & William Ramsey (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press. pp. 9.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    Explaining Human Freedom and Dignity Mechanistically: From Receptive to Active Mechanisms.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:43-66.
    Mechanistic explanation is the dominant approach to explanation in the life sciences, but it has been challenged as incompatible with a conception of humans as agents whose capacity for self-direction endows them with freedom and dignity. We argue that the mechanical philosophy, properly construed, has sufficient resources to explain how such characteristics can arise in a material world. Biological mechanisms must be regarded as active, not only reactive, and as organized so as to maintain themselves far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Notions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  15
    Cognizers' Innards and Connectionist Nets: A Holy Alliance?Adele A. Abrahamsen - 1993 - Mind and Language 8 (4):520-530.
  28.  5
    Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056.Thomas Baldwin, William Bechtel, Adele Abrahamsen, Richard Boothby, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Mario Bunge, Steven M. Cahn, Peter Markie & David Cockburn - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):107.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  3
    Cleeremans, A. 282 Cotman, CW 229 Creary, LG 59 F.(N. 16), 70 (N. 26) Crick, F. 227 Crow, TJ 233.A. A. Abrahamsen, D. M. Armstrong, V. H. Auerbach, R. Avenarius, F. J. Ayala, Ke Von Baer, D. A. Bantz, H. Barlow, E. Buchner & T. Burge - 1992 - In Ansgar Beckermann, H. Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Essays on the Prospects of Nonreductive Physicalism. W. De Gruyter.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    Citation Index.R. P. Abelson, A. A. Abrahamsen, A. Adelstein, P. Ammon, J. Anderson, R. A. Anderson, E. Aronson, J. L. Aronson, J. Astington & R. C. Atkinson - 1997 - In David Martel Johnson & Christina E. Erneling (eds.), The Future of the Cognitive Revolution. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Learning, Reward, and Cognitive Differences.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):448.
  32. Citation Index.Abelson Rp, A. A. Abrahamsen, A. Adelstein, P. Atnmon, J. Anderson, R. A. Anderson, H. Arendt, E. Aronson, J. L. Aronson & S. Asch - 1997 - In David Martel Johnson & Christina E. Erneling (eds.), The Future of the Cognitive Revolution. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography