Results for 'A. B. C. Research Group'

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  1.  17
    Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart.Gerd Gigerenzer, Peter M. Todd & A. B. C. Research Group - 1999 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press USA.
    Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart invites readers to embark on a new journey into a land of rationality that differs from the familiar territory of cognitive science and economics. Traditional views of rationality tend to see decision makers as possessing superhuman powers of reason, limitless knowledge, and all of eternity in which to ponder choices. To understand decisions in the real world, we need a different, more psychologically plausible notion of rationality, and this book provides it. It is about (...)
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  2.  27
    Historical Spectrum of Value Theories. [REVIEW]S. C. A. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):819-820.
    These volumes provide a large introduction to the works of modern value theory from their beginnings in J. Bentham, F. Nietzsche, and H. Lotze to the more recent Anglo-American studies. Volume I is concerned with "the German-Language Group." Extensive discussion is devoted to the views of F. Brentano, A. Meinong, C. von Ehrenfels, J. C. Kreibig, E. Heyde, H. Rickert, H. Münsterberg, M. Scheler, K. Wiederhold, W. Stern, F. Wilken, M. Beck, and V. Krafts. It provides a good conspectus (...)
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  3.  35
    Returning a Research Participant's Genomic Results to Relatives: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Rebecca Branum, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):440-463.
    Genomic research results and incidental findings with health implications for a research participant are of potential interest not only to the participant, but also to the participant's family. Yet investigators lack guidance on return of results to relatives, including after the participant's death. In this paper, a national working group offers consensus analysis and recommendations, including an ethical framework to guide investigators in managing this challenging issue, before and after the participant's death.
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  4.  21
    Increasing the Acceptability and Rates of Organ Donation Among Minority Ethnic Groups: A Programme of Observational and Evaluative Research on Donation, Transplantation and Ethnicity.M. Morgan, C. Kenten, S. Deedat, B. Farsides, T. Newton, G. Randhawa, J. Sims & M. Sque - unknown
    Background: Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups have a high need for organ transplantation but deceased donation is low. This restricts the availability of well-matched organs and results in relatively long waiting times for transplantation, with increased mortality risks. Objective: To identify barriers to organ donor registration and family consent among the BAME population, and to develop and evaluate a training intervention to enhance communication with ethnic minority families and identify impacts on family consent. Methods: Three-phase programme comprising community-based (...) involving two systematic reviews examining attitudes and barriers to organ donation and effective interventions followed by 22 focus groups with minority ethnic groups; hospital-based research examining staff practices and influences on family consent through ethics discussion groups with staff, a study on intensive care units and interviews with bereaved ethnic minority families; and development and evaluation of a training package to enhance cultural competence among ICU staff. Setting: Community focus group study in eight London boroughs with high prevalence of ethnic minority populations. Hospital studies at five NHS hospital trusts. Participants: Community studies: 228 focus group participants; hospital studies: 35 nurses, 28 clinicians, 19 hospital chaplains, 25 members of local Organ Donation Committees, 17 bereaved family members; and evaluation: 66 health professionals. Data sources: Focus groups with community residents, systematic reviews, qualitative interviews and observation in ICUs, EDGs with ICU staff, bereaved family interviews and questionnaires for trial evaluation. Review methods: Systematic review and narrative synthesis. Results: Community studies: Organ Donor Register – different ethnic/faith and age groups were at varying points on the ‘pathway’ to organ donor registration, with large numbers lacking knowledge and remaining at a pre-contemplation stage. Key attitudinal barriers were uncertainties regarding religious permissibility, bodily concerns, lack of trust in health professionals and little priority given to registration, with the varying significance of these factors varying by ethnicity/faith and age. National campaigns focusing on ethnic minorities have had limited impact, whereas characteristics of effective educational interventions are being conducted in a familiar environment; addressing the groups’ particular concerns; delivery by trained members of the lay community; and providing immediate access to registration. Interventions are also required to target those at specific stages of the donation pathway. Hospital studies: family consent to donation – many ICU staff, especially junior nurses, described a lack of confidence in communication and supporting ethnic minority families, often reflecting differences in emotional expression, faith and cultural beliefs, and language difficulties. The continuing high proportion of family donation discussions that take place without the collaboration of a specialist nurse for organ donation reflected consultants’ views of their own role in family consent to donation, a lack of trust in SNODs and uncertainties surrounding controlled donations after circulatory death. Hospital chaplains differed in their involvement in ICUs, reflecting their availability/employment status, personal interests and the practices of ICU staff. Evaluation: professional development package – a digital versatile disk-based training package was developed to promote confidence and skills in cross-cultural communication. Initial evaluation produced positive feedback and significant affirmative attitudinal change but no significant difference in consent rate over the short follow-up period with requirements for longer-term evaluation. Limitations: Participants in the focus group study were mainly first-generation migrants of manual socioeconomic groups. It was not permitted to identify non-consenting families for interview with data regarding the consent process were therefore limited to consenting families. Conclusions: The research presents guidance for the effective targeting of donation campaigns focusing on minority ethnic groups and provides the first training package in cultural competence in the NHS. Future work: Greater evaluation is required of community interventions in the UK to enhance knowledge of effective practice and analysis of the experiences of non-consenting ethnic minority families. Funding: The National Institute for Health Research Programme Grants for Applied Research programme. (shrink)
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  5.  84
    Scientific Research and the Public Trust.David B. Resnik - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):399-409.
    This essay analyzes the concept of public trust in science and offers some guidance for ethicists, scientists, and policymakers who use this idea defend ethical rules or policies pertaining to the conduct of research. While the notion that public trusts science makes sense in the abstract, it may not be sufficiently focused to support the various rules and policies that authors have tried to derive from it, because the public is not a uniform body with a common set of (...)
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  6.  7
    Weakly Minimal Groups with a New Predicate.Gabriel Conant & Michael C. Laskowski - 2020 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 20 (2):2050011.
    Fix a weakly minimal (i.e. superstable U-rank 1) structure M. Let M∗ be an expansion by constants for an elementary substructure, and let A be an arbitrary subset of the universe M. We show that all formulas in the expansion (M∗,A) are equivalent to bounded formulas, and so (M,A) is stable (or NIP) if and only if the M-induced structure AM on A is stable (or NIP). We then restrict to the case that M is a pure abelian group (...)
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  7.  30
    A Cultural-Psychological Theory of Contemporary Islamic Martyrdom.C. Dominik Güss, Ma Teresa Tuason & Vanessa B. Teixeira - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):415–445.
    What political, economic, religious, and emotional factors are involved in a person's decision to kill civilians and military personnel through the sacrifice of his or her own life? Data for this research were secondary analyses of interviews with Islamic martyrs, as well as their leaders’ speeches. This investigation into the cultural-psychological explanations for Islamic martyrdom leads to a model explaining a person's decision to carry out the mission as resulting from a combination of four factors: the historical-cultural context, (...) processes, immediate and anticipated rewards, and mechanisms to eradicate possible doubts and guilt regarding this decision. Compared to existing models, this model is more integrative and focused on the psychological processes involved. (shrink)
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  8.  33
    A Review of Research in Mathematical Education: Part A, Research on Learning and TeachingA Review of Research in Mathematical Education: Part B, Research on the Social Context of Mathematics EducationA Review of Research in Mathematical Education: Part C, Curriculum Development and Curriculum Research[REVIEW]John K. Backhouse, Susan E. B. Pirie, A. W. Bell, J. Costello, D. E. Kuchemann, A. J. Bishop, Marilyn Nickson & A. G. Howson - 1984 - British Journal of Educational Studies 32 (3):280.
  9.  24
    Marginalized Populations and Drug Addiction Research: Realism, Mistrust, and Misconception.C. B. Fisher, M. Oransky, M. Mahadevan, M. Singer, G. Mirhej & D. Hodge - 2007 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 30 (3):1-9.
    This study explored drug users’ attitudes toward and understanding of randomized controlled trials testing addiction therapies. A video portraying a fictional consent conference for a randomized controlled trial with placebo arm was shown to poor male and female drug users of diverse ethnic status and sexual orientation. The video stimulated focus group discussion in which participants’ comments often reflected “experimental realism”—a realistic view of the trial—and adequate understanding of the uncertain efficacy of the treatment being tested, as well as (...)
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  10.  27
    Pragmatic Tools for Sharing Genomic Research Results with the Relatives of Living and Deceased Research Participants.Susan M. Wolf, Emily Scholtes, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):87-109.
    Returning genomic research results to family members raises complex questions. Genomic research on life-limiting conditions such as cancer, and research involving storage and reanalysis of data and specimens long into the future, makes these questions pressing. This author group, funded by an NIH grant, published consensus recommendations presenting a framework. This follow-up paper offers concrete guidance and tools for implementation. The group collected and analyzed relevant documents and guidance, including tools from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory (...)
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  11.  23
    Informed Consent in Ghana: What Do Participants Really Understand?Z. Hill, C. Tawiah-Agyemang, S. Odei-Danso & B. Kirkwood - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):48-53.
    Objectives: To explore how subjects in a placebo-controlled vitamin A supplementation trial among Ghanaian women aged 15–45 years perceive the trial and whether they know that not all trial capsules are the same, and to identify factors associated with this knowledge.Methods: 60 semistructured interviews and 12 focus groups were conducted to explore subjects’ perceptions of the trial. Steps were taken to address areas of low comprehension, including retraining fieldworkers. 1971 trial subjects were randomly selected for a survey measuring their knowledge (...)
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  12.  27
    Measuring Consumers' Ethical Position in Austria, Britain, Brunei, Hong Kong and USA.C. C. Cui, V. Mitchell, B. Schlegelmilch & T. B. Cornwell - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (1):57-71.
    Previous studies have found Forsyth’s Ethical Position Questionnaire (EPQ) to vary between countries, but none has made a systematic evaluation of its psychometric properties across consumers from many countries. Using confirmatory factor analysis and multi-group LISREL analysis, this paper explores the factor structure of the EPQ and the measurement equivalence in five societies: Austria, Britain, Brunei, Hong Kong and USA. The results suggest that the modified scale, measuring idealism and relativism, was applicable in all five societies. Equivalence was found (...)
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  13.  32
    Proceedings From the IV Brazilian Meeting on Research Integrity, Science and Publication Ethics : Goi'nia, Brasil. 17-18 November 2016. [REVIEW]A. S. C. Abreu, H. S. Selistre-de-Araujo, D. Guilhem, M. R. C. G. Novaes, N. R. A. Silva, M. Palácios, P. G. Camacho, M. Russo, A. Abreu, S. Cruz-Riascos, L. V. R. Rezende, A. C. Quintela, J. Leta, E. Damasio, H. H. Caiaffa Filho, R. M. Catarino, A. A. B. Almodóvar, A. P. Vicentini, B. C. Machado, M. M. Sorenson, J. R. Lapa E. Silva, A. Palma, R. M. V. R. Almeida, E. H. Watanabe, D. Foguel, S. M. R. Vasconcelos, C. A. Guimarães, A. Schtscherbyna, J. C. Amaral, H. G. Falcão, F. R. Mota, S. C. Bourguignon, R. Kant de Lima, S. Liskauskas, M. C. Cassimiro, J. Araújo, A. S. Carvalho, M. Patrão Neves, F. M. Litto, M. D. P. Silva, L. S. Gracioso, A. C. Furnival, P. M. Lourenço, V. Ronchi, M. M. M. Machado, R. Amaral, M. D. Ribeiro, R. Neves, V. C. Garbocci, M. Fontes-Domingues, P. Biancovilli, R. T. Souza, P. V. S. Souza, D. C. Machado, C. C. Santos, A. M. Gollner, H. S. Pinheiro, G. A. Fófano, A. A. P. Santa Rosa, C. H. Debenedito Silva, A. M. M. Soares, M. M. P. Diós-Borges, E. Duarte & Gar - 2017 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 2 (Suppl 1).
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  14.  45
    Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research Integrity: Brazil, Rio de Janeiro. 31 May - 3 June 2015.Lex Bouter, Melissa S. Anderson, Ana Marusic, Sabine Kleinert, Susan Zimmerman, Paulo S. L. Beirão, Laura Beranzoli, Giuseppe Di Capua, Silvia Peppoloni, Maria Betânia de Freitas Marques, Adriana Sousa, Claudia Rech, Torunn Ellefsen, Adele Flakke Johannessen, Jacob Holen, Raymond Tait, Jillon Van der Wall, John Chibnall, James M. DuBois, Farida Lada, Jigisha Patel, Stephanie Harriman, Leila Posenato Garcia, Adriana Nascimento Sousa, Cláudia Maria Correia Borges Rech, Oliveira Patrocínio, Raphaela Dias Fernandes, Laressa Lima Amâncio, Anja Gillis, David Gallacher, David Malwitz, Tom Lavrijssen, Mariusz Lubomirski, Malini Dasgupta, Katie Speanburg, Elizabeth C. Moylan, Maria K. Kowalczuk, Nikolas Offenhauser, Markus Feufel, Niklas Keller, Volker Bähr, Diego Oliveira Guedes, Douglas Leonardo Gomes Filho, Vincent Larivière, Rodrigo Costas, Daniele Fanelli, Mark William Neff, Aline Carolina de Oliveira Machado Prata, Limbanazo Matandika, Sonia Maria Ramos de Vasconcelos & Karina de A. Rocha - 2016 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 1 (Suppl 1).
    Table of contentsI1 Proceedings of the 4th World Conference on Research IntegrityConcurrent Sessions:1. Countries' systems and policies to foster research integrityCS01.1 Second time around: Implementing and embedding a review of responsible conduct of research policy and practice in an Australian research-intensive universitySusan Patricia O'BrienCS01.2 Measures to promote research integrity in a university: the case of an Asian universityDanny Chan, Frederick Leung2. Examples of research integrity education programmes in different countriesCS02.1 Development of a state-run “cyber (...)
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  15.  23
    The Ethics of Online Research with Unsuspecting Users: From A/B Testing to C/D Experimentation.Raquel Benbunan-Fich - 2017 - Research Ethics 13 (3-4):200-218.
    This article analyzes recent cases of company-sponsored online experiments with unsuspecting users and discusses the ethical aspects of such experimentation. These cases illustrate a new type of online research where companies modify their algorithms to intentionally misinform or mislead users. Unlike typical forms of A/B testing, where two versions of the same website are presented to different users to evaluate interface changes, algorithm modification is a deeper form of testing where changes in program code induce user deception. Thus, we (...)
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  16.  1
    Playing in the Gender Transgression Zone: Race, Class, and Hegemonic Masculinity in Middle Childhood.B. Lindsay Rich & C. Shawn Mcguffey - 1999 - Gender and Society 13 (5):608-627.
    This research focuses on how children negotiate gender boundaries in middle childhood play. Over a nine-week period, children were observed creating, defining, and altering gender codes in a summer day camp. When girls and boys disregarded pre-described boundaries, they entered an area we refer to as the gender transgression zone. This area of activity, where boys and girls conduct heterosocial relations in hopes of either maintaining or expanding gender boundaries in child culture, is where gender transgression takes place. The (...)
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  17.  13
    Epidemiology and Moral Philosophy.C. G. Westrin, T. Nilstun, B. Smedby & B. Haglund - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (4):193-196.
    To an increasing extent ethical controversies affect and sometimes obstruct public health work and epidemiological research. In order to improve communication between the concerned parties a model for identification and analysis of ethical conflicts in individual-based research has been worked out in co-operation between epidemiologists and moral philosophers. The model has two dimensions. One dimension specifies relevant ethical principles (as beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice). The other dimension specifies the groups of persons involved in the conflict under consideration (...)
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  18.  7
    Benefits Analysis of Smart Grid Projects.C. Marnay, L. Liu, J. Yu, D. Zhang, J. Mauzy, B. Shaffer, X. Dong, W. Agate & S. Vitiello - unknown
    Smart grids are rolling out internationally, with the United States nearing completion of a significant USD4-plus-billion federal program funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The emergence of smart grids is widespread across developed countries. Multiple approaches to analyzing the benefits of smart grids have emerged. The goals of this white paper are to review these approaches and analyze examples of each to highlight their differences, advantages, and disadvantages. This work was conducted under the auspices of a joint U.S.-China (...)
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  19.  73
    Exploring the Ethics of Long-Term Research Engagement With Communities in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.A. A. Hyder, C. B. Krubiner, G. Bloom & A. Bhuiya - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):252-262.
    Over the past few decades, there has been increasing attention focused on the ethics of health research, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the increasing focus on the literature addressing human protection, community engagement, appropriate consent procedures and ways to mitigate concerns around exploitation, there has been little discussion about how the duration of the research engagement may affect the ethical design and implementation of studies. In other words, what are the unique ethical challenges when researchers engage (...)
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  20.  20
    Key Factors in Children’s Competence to Consent to Clinical Research.Irma M. Hein, Pieter W. Troost, Robert Lindeboom, Marc A. Benninga, C. Michel Zwaan, Johannes B. van Goudoever & Ramón J. L. Lindauer - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):74.
    Although law is established on a strong presumption that persons younger than a certain age are not competent to consent, statutory age limits for asking children’s consent to clinical research differ widely internationally. From a clinical perspective, competence is assumed to involve many factors including the developmental stage, the influence of parents and peers, and life experience. We examined potential determining factors for children’s competence to consent to clinical research and to what extent they explain the variation in (...)
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  21.  3
    Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Following Lung Transplantation: Challenges and Solutions.B. C. Bemiss & C. A. Witt - 2014 - Transplant Research and Risk Management 2014.
    Bradford C Bemiss, Chad A WittDepartment of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA: Chronic rejection is a major cause of death after the first year following lung transplantation. Bronchiolitis obliterans is the most common pathologic finding on biopsy, characterized by fibrous granulation tissue, which obliterates the lumen of the bronchiole. Clinically, in the absence of tissue for pathology, BO syndrome refers to a progressive irreversible drop in the forced (...)
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  22.  45
    A Partial Application Procedure for Ross’s Ethical Theory.B. C. Postow - 2006 - Journal of Philosophical Research 31:239-248.
    W. D. Ross’s ethical theory requires us somehow to compare the metaphorical “weights” of different prima facie duties, but it leaves mysterious how this might be done. The formulation of a procedure to achieve such a comparison would be desirable on practical, theoretical, and pedagogical grounds. I formulate a procedure that is congenial to Ross’s theory. Central to my procedure are instructions to characterize the weight of each prima facie duty with respect to (a) the general stringency of this kind (...)
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  23.  4
    Making Ocean Literacy Inclusive and Accessible.B. Worm, C. Elliff, J. G. Fonseca, F. R. Gell, C. Serra-Gonçalves, N. K. Helder, K. Murray, H. Peckham, L. Prelovec & K. Sink - 2021 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 21:1-9.
    Engagement in marine science has historically been the privilege of a small number of people with access to higher education, specialised equipment and research funding. Such constraints have often limited public engagement and may have slowed the uptake of ocean science into environmental policy. Recognition of this disconnect has spurred a growing movement to promote ocean literacy, defined as one’s individual understanding of how the ocean affects people and how people affect the ocean. Over the last 2 decades, this (...)
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  24.  28
    Pere Alberch: Originator of EvoDevo.John O. Reiss, Ann C. Burke, Charles Archer, Miquel de Renzi, Hernán Dopazo, Arantza Etxeberría, Emily A. Gale, J. Richard Hinchliffe, Laura Nuño de la Rosa, Chris S. Rose, Diego Rasskin-Gutman & Gerd B. Müller - 2008 - Biological Theory 3 (4):351-356.
    In September 2008, 10 years after the untimely death of Pere Alberch (1954–1998), the 20th Altenberg Workshop in Theoretical Biology gathered a group of Pere’s students, col- laborators, and colleagues (Figure 1) to celebrate his contribu- tions to the origins of EvoDevo. Hosted by the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI) outside Vienna, the group met for two days of discussion. The meeting was organized in tandem with a congress held in May 2008 at (...)
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  25.  39
    Human Male Pair Bonding and Testosterone.Peter B. Gray, Judith Flynn Chapman, Terence C. Burnham, Matthew H. McIntyre, Susan F. Lipson & Peter T. Ellison - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (2):119-131.
    Previous research in North America has supported the view that male involvement in committed, romantic relationships is associated with lower testosterone (T) levels. Here, we test the prediction that undergraduate men involved in committed, romantic relationships (paired) will have lower T levels than men not involved in such relationships (unpaired). Further, we also test whether these differences are more apparent in samples collected later, rather than earlier, in the day. For this study, 107 undergraduate men filled out a questionnaire (...)
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  26.  9
    Company–Community Agreements, Gender and Development.J. C. Keenan, D. L. Kemp & R. B. Ramsay - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):607-615.
    Company–community agreements are widely considered to be a practical mechanism for recognising the rights, needs and priorities of peoples impacted by mining, for managing impacts and ensuring that mining-derived benefits are shared. The use and application of company–community agreements is increasing globally. Notwithstanding the utility of these agreements, the gender dimensions of agreement processes in mining have rarely been studied. Prior research on women and mining demonstrates that women are often more adversely impacted by mining than men, and face (...)
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  27.  40
    Mind the Gaps in Ethical Regulations of Nursing Research.B. M. Schrems - 2013 - Nursing Ethics (3):0969733012462051.
    The introduction of and the commitment to evidence-based nursing in all care settings have led to a rapid increase of intervention and outcome-based research programs. Yet, the topics of nursing research are not only affected by interventions and outcomes but also affected by the concept of caring derived from humanistic philosophy. Considering this twofold orientation of nursing science, nuanced ethical regulations for nursing research programs are called for. In addition to the different research approaches, further arguments (...)
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  28.  34
    On the Heavens.384-322 B. C. Aristotle - 1939 - Heinemann Harvard University Press.
    Aristotle, great Greek philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 BCE, was the son of Nicomachus, a physician, and Phaestis. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367?347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias's relations. After some time at Mitylene, in 343?2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be tutor of his teen-aged son (...)
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  29.  7
    A Partial Application Procedure for Ross’s Ethical Theory.B. C. Postow - 2006 - Journal of Philosophical Research 31:239-248.
    W. D. Ross’s ethical theory requires us somehow to compare the metaphorical “weights” of different prima facie duties, but it leaves mysterious how this might be done. The formulation of a procedure to achieve such a comparison would be desirable on practical, theoretical, and pedagogical grounds. I formulate a procedure that is congenial to Ross’s theory. Central to my procedure are instructions to characterize the weight of each prima facie duty with respect to the general stringency of this kind of (...)
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  30.  14
    Biological Aspects of a High Socio-Economic Group II. IQ Components and Social Mobility.John B. Gibson & C. G. Nicholas Mascie-Taylor - 1973 - Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (1):17-30.
  31.  4
    Updating Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy: The Development of STARD 2015.Patrick M. M. Bossuyt, Lotty Hooft, Douglas G. Altman, Henrica C. W. de Vet, David Moher, Les Irwig, Paul P. Glasziou, Constantine A. Gatsonis, David E. Bruns, Johannes B. Reitsma, Jérémie F. Cohen & Daniël A. Korevaar - 2016 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 1 (1).
    BackgroundAlthough the number of reporting guidelines has grown rapidly, few have gone through an updating process. The STARD statement, published in 2003 to help improve the transparency and completeness of reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies, was recently updated in a systematic way. Here, we describe the steps taken and a justification for the changes made.ResultsA 4-member Project Team coordinated the updating process; a 14-member Steering Committee was regularly solicited by the Project Team when making critical decisions. First, a review of (...)
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  32.  1
    Characteristics of ‘Mega’ Peer-Reviewers.David Moher, Andrea C. Tricco, Justin Presseau, Ba’ Pham & Danielle B. Rice - 2022 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 7 (1).
    BackgroundThe demand for peer reviewers is often perceived as disproportionate to the supply and availability of reviewers. Considering characteristics associated with peer review behaviour can allow for the development of solutions to manage the growing demand for peer reviewers. The objective of this research was to compare characteristics among two groups of reviewers registered in Publons.MethodsA descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to compare characteristics between individuals completing at least 100 peer reviews from January 2018 to December 2018 as (...)
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  33.  25
    R. G. Collingwood: A Bibliographic Checklist.C. J. B. & Christopher Dreisbach - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (180):417.
    This out of print work offered researchers a comprehensive and easy to use bibliography of primary and secondary works by or about Collingwood. More than 1,200 citations were listed alphabetically by standard bibliographical categories in this volume, which contained a periodical index as well as author and subject indexes. In addition, each book entry included a "review alert" listing the names of reviewers. Author notes clarified the significance of a listed work when this was not apparent from the title, and (...)
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  34. The Red Book: Reflections on C.G. Jung's Liber Novus.Thomas Kirsch & George B. Hogenson (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    In 2009, WW Norton published ‘The Red Book’, a book written by Jung in 1913-1914 but not previously published. Snippets of information about the likely contents of the Red Book had been in circulation for years, and there was much debate and eager anticipation of its publication within the Jungian field and the larger reading public. In 2010, a conference was held at the San Francisco Jungian Institute which brought together an international group of distinguished scholars in analytical psychology (...)
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  35.  20
    Patterns of Participation in Farmers' Research Groups: Lessons From the Highlands of Southwestern Uganda. [REVIEW]Pascal C. Sanginga, Jackson Tumwine & Nina K. Lilja - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):501-512.
    There is increasing interest in farmers’ organizations as an effective approach to farmer participatory research (FPR). Using data from an empirical study of farmers’ research groups (FRGs) in Uganda, this paper examines the patterns of participation in groups and answers questions such as: Who participates? What types of participation? How does participation occur? What are the factors determining participation? Results show that there is no single type of participation, but rather that FPR is a dynamic process with types (...)
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  36.  12
    L. A. Harrington, M. D. Morley, A. S̆c̆edrov, and S. G. Simpson. Introduction. Harvey Friedman's Research on the Foundations of Mathematics, Edited by L. A. Harrington, M. D. Morley, A. Ščedrov, and S. G. Simpson, Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, Vol. 117, North-Holland, Amsterdam, New York, and Oxford, 1985, Pp. Vii–Xii. [REVIEW]H. B. Enderton - 1990 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):867-868.
  37.  16
    History of Science Teaching in England. By D. M. Turner M.A., B.Sc. (Lond.), Head of Science Department, Wycombe Abbey School; Research Assistant, University College, London. (London: Chapman & Hall, Ltd. 1927. Pp. X + 208. Price 7s. 6d.). [REVIEW]Joshua C. Gregory - 1928 - Philosophy 3 (10):256-.
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  38. Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Agricultural Research, Vol. 1, International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos.C. G. Mclaren, V. I. Bartolome, M. C. Carrasco, L. C. Quintana, M. I. B. Ferino, J. Z. Mojica, A. B. Olea, L. C. Paunlagui, C. G. Ramos & M. A. Ynalvez - forthcoming - Laguna.
     
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  39. A Taxonomy of Multinational Ethical and Methodological Standards for Clinical Trials of Therapeutic Interventions.C. M. Ashton, N. P. Wray, A. F. Jarman, J. M. Kolman, D. M. Wenner & B. A. Brody - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):368-373.
    Background If trials of therapeutic interventions are to serve society's interests, they must be of high methodological quality and must satisfy moral commitments to human subjects. The authors set out to develop a clinical - trials compendium in which standards for the ethical treatment of human subjects are integrated with standards for research methods. Methods The authors rank-ordered the world's nations and chose the 31 with >700 active trials as of 24 July 2008. Governmental and other authoritative entities of (...)
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  40.  63
    Ethical Relativism and the Ideal Observer.B. C. Postow - 1978 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (1):120-121.
    I show that roderick firth's ideal observer theory contains a loophole which allows conflicting ethical statements to be true. To remedy this, I recommend that we add to the list of defining characteristics of an ideal observer, The requirement that he be unable to have obligation-Determining reactions toward acts which he knows to be incompatible.
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  41.  12
    Dicta Scipionis of 131 B.C.A. E. Astin - 1960 - Classical Quarterly 10 (1-2):135-.
    For the historian who aspires to the study of Scipio Aemilianus one of the happier features of his material is the considerable number of Scipio's dicta which have been preserved: sayings which are distinct from the extracts from formal speeches yet which in most cases were uttered in public. This paper is concerned with a small group of such dicta which belong to the last period of Scipio's life, between his return from Numantia in 132 and his death in (...)
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  42.  22
    Managing Socio-Ethical Challenges in the Development of Smart Farming: From a Fragmented to a Comprehensive Approach for Responsible Research and Innovation.C. Eastwood, L. Klerkx, M. Ayre & B. Dela Rue - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5):741-768.
    Smart farming has largely been driven by productivity and efficiency aims, but there is an increasing awareness of potential socio-ethical challenges. The responsible research and innovation approach aims to address such challenges but has had limited application in smart farming contexts. Using smart dairying research and development in New Zealand as a case study, we examine the extent to which principles of RRI have been applied in NZ smart dairying development and assess the broader lessons for RRI application (...)
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  43.  2
    Gender, Race and Parenthood Impact Academic Productivity During the COVID-19 Pandemic: From Survey to Action.Fernanda Staniscuaski, Livia Kmetzsch, Rossana C. Soletti, Fernanda Reichert, Eugenia Zandonà, Zelia M. C. Ludwig, Eliade F. Lima, Adriana Neumann, Ida V. D. Schwartz, Pamela B. Mello-Carpes, Alessandra S. K. Tamajusuku, Fernanda P. Werneck, Felipe K. Ricachenevsky, Camila Infanger, Adriana Seixas, Charley C. Staats & Leticia de Oliveira - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is altering dynamics in academia, and people juggling remote work and domestic demands – including childcare – have felt impacts on their productivity. Female authors have faced a decrease in paper submission rates since the beginning of the pandemic period. The reasons for this decline in women’s productivity need to be further investigated. Here, we analyzed the influence of gender, parenthood and race on academic productivity during the pandemic period based on a survey answered by (...)
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  44.  3
    Managing Socio-Ethical Challenges in the Development of Smart Farming: From a Fragmented to a Comprehensive Approach for Responsible Research and Innovation.C. Eastwood, L. Klerkx, M. Ayre & B. Dela Rue - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5):741-768.
    Smart farming has largely been driven by productivity and efficiency aims, but there is an increasing awareness of potential socio-ethical challenges. The responsible research and innovation approach aims to address such challenges but has had limited application in smart farming contexts. Using smart dairying research and development in New Zealand as a case study, we examine the extent to which principles of RRI have been applied in NZ smart dairying development and assess the broader lessons for RRI application (...)
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  45.  8
    Research in Progress: The Formation of Professional and Consumer Solutions: Ethics in the General Practice Setting.C. A. Berglund, C. D. Pond, M. F. Harris, P. M. McNeill, D. Gietzelt, E. Comino, V. Traynor, E. Meldrum & C. Boland - 1997 - Health Care Analysis 5 (2):164-167.
    A general practice research project on ethics is underway at the University of New South Wales, funded by GPEP. Ethical issues, as defined and explored by general practitioners and consumers, are being examined across four areas of Sydney.So far, telephone interviews have been conducted with a random sample of general practitioners. Face-to-face interviews have been conducted with 107 consumers, randomly sampled using ABS collection district information. Focus groups have been formed to discuss acceptable solutions to GP and consumer identified (...)
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  46.  22
    Research Ethics: Who Should Consent for Research in Adult Intensive Care? Preferences of Patients and Their Relatives: A Pilot Study.C. Chenaud, P. Merlani, M. Verdon & B. Ricou - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (11):709-712.
    Introduction: Research in intensive care is necessary for the continuing advancement of patient care. In research, informed consent is considered essential for patient protection. In intensive care, the modalities of informed consent are currently being debated by both lawyers and the medical community. The preferences of patients and their relatives regarding informed consent for research in intensive care have never been assessed. The aim of this study was to investigate these preferences. Methods: A pilot study conducted via (...)
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  47.  4
    Research in Progress: The Formation of Professional and Consumer Solutions: Ethics in the General Practice Setting.C. A. Berglund, C. D. Pond, M. F. Harris, P. M. McNeill, D. Gietzelt, E. Comino, V. Traynor, E. Meldrum & C. Boland - 1997 - Health Care Analysis 5 (2):164-167.
    A general practice research project on ethics is underway at the University of New South Wales, funded by GPEP. Ethical issues, as defined and explored by general practitioners and consumers, are being examined across four areas of Sydney.So far, telephone interviews have been conducted with a random sample of general practitioners. Face-to-face interviews have been conducted with 107 consumers, randomly sampled using ABS collection district information. Focus groups have been formed to discuss acceptable solutions to GP and consumer identified (...)
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  48.  32
    The Picture Talk Project: Starting a Conversation with Community Leaders on Research with Remote Aboriginal Communities of Australia.E. F. M. Fitzpatrick, G. Macdonald, A. L. C. Martiniuk, H. D’Antoine, J. Oscar, M. Carter, T. Lawford & E. J. Elliott - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):34.
    Researchers are required to seek consent from Indigenous communities prior to conducting research but there is inadequate information about how Indigenous people understand and become fully engaged with this consent process. Few studies evaluate the preference or understanding of the consent process for research with Indigenous populations. Lack of informed consent can impact on research findings. The Picture Talk Project was initiated with senior Aboriginal leaders of the Fitzroy Valley community situated in the far north of Western (...)
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  49. Improving Understanding in the Research Informed Consent Process: A Systematic Review of 54 Interventions Tested in Randomized Control Trials. [REVIEW]Adam Nishimura, Jantey Carey, Patricia J. Erwin, Jon C. Tilburt, M. Hassan Murad & Jennifer B. McCormick - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):28.
    Obtaining informed consent is a cornerstone of biomedical research, yet participants comprehension of presented information is often low. The most effective interventions to improve understanding rates have not been identified.
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  50.  95
    Informed Consent Instead of Assent is Appropriate in Children From the Age of Twelve: Policy Implications of New Findings on Children’s Competence to Consent to Clinical Research.Irma M. Hein, Martine C. De Vries, Pieter W. Troost, Gerben Meynen, Johannes B. Van Goudoever & Ramón J. L. Lindauer - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundFor many decades, the debate on children’s competence to give informed consent in medical settings concentrated on ethical and legal aspects, with little empirical underpinnings. Recently, data from empirical research became available to advance the discussion. It was shown that children’s competence to consent to clinical research could be accurately assessed by the modified MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research. Age limits for children to be deemed competent to decide on research participation have been studied: (...)
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