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  1.  45
    Two Challenges to the Double Effect Doctrine: Euthanasia and Abortion.A. B. Shaw - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):102-104.
    The validity of the double effect doctrine is examined in euthanasia and abortion. In these two situations killing is a method of treatment. It is argued that the doctrine cannot apply to the care of the dying. Firstly, doctors are obliged to harm patients in order to do good to them. Secondly, patients should make their own value judgments about being mutilated or killed. Thirdly, there is little intuitive moral difference between direct and indirect killing. Nor can the doctrine apply (...)
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  2.  10
    Non-Therapeutic (Elective) Ventilation of Potential Organ Donors: The Ethical Basis for Changing the Law.A. B. Shaw - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (2):72-77.
    Non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors would increase the supply of kidneys for transplantation. There are no major ethical objections to it. The means of permitting it are forbidden by laws with an ethical basis. A law permitting it would need an ethical basis. Introducing a third legal method of diagnosing death would be unethical. Expanding the power of the advance directive to permit procedures involving minimal harm would be ethical but not helpful. Extending the power of proxies to permit (...)
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  3.  34
    Depressive Illness Delayed Hamlet's Revenge.A. B. Shaw - 2002 - Medical Humanities 28 (2):92-96.
    If Hamlet had not delayed his revenge there would have been no play. Many explanations of the delay have been offered in the last four centuries. None is convincing. The interpretation which best fits the evidence best is that Hamlet was suffering from an acute depressive illness, with some obsessional features. He could not make a firm resolve to act. In Shakespeare’s time there was no concept of acute depressive illness, although melancholy was well known. Melancholy, however, would have been (...)
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  4.  5
    In Defence of Ageism.A. B. Shaw - 1994 - Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):188-194.
    Health care should be preferentially allocated to younger patients. This is just and is seen as just. Age is an objective factor in rationing decisions. The arguments against 'ageism' are answered. The effects of age on current methods of rationing are illustrated, and the practical applications of an age-related criterion are discussed. Ageist policies are in current use and open discussion of them is advocated.
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  5.  19
    Intuitions, Principles and Consequences.A. B. Shaw - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):16-19.
    Some approaches to the assessment of moral intuitions are discussed. The controlled ethical trial isolates a moral issue from confounding factors and thereby clarifies what a person's intuition actually is. Casuistic reasoning from situations, where intuitions are clear, suggests or modifies principles, which can then help to make decisions in situations where intuitions are unclear. When intuitions are defended by a supporting principle, that principle can be tested by finding extreme cases, in which it is counterintuitive to follow the principle. (...)
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  6.  14
    Why Causing Death is Not Necessarily Morally Equivalent to Allowing to Die - a Response to Ferguson.A. B. Shaw - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):282-282.
  7.  15
    In Defence of Ageism.A. B. Shaw - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):117-118.
    Health care should be preferentially allocated to younger patients. This is just and is seen as just. Age is an objective factor in rationing decisions. The arguments against 'ageism' are answered. The effects of age on current methods of rationing are illustrated, and the practical applications of an age-related criterion are discussed. Ageist policies are in current use and open discussion of them is advocated.
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