35 found
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  1.  58
    Rethinking the Structure of Evolutionary Theory for an Extended Synthesis.A. C. Love - 2010 - In M. Pigliucci & G. Müller (eds.), Evolution—The Extended Synthesis. MIT Press. pp. 403–441.
    This chapter describes the theoretical implications of Extended Synthesis and addresses the methodological options available for determining aspects of theoretical structure. It uses a “bottom-up” approach focused on evolutionary theory in particular, as opposed to a “top-down” strategy that attempts to characterize the structure of all scientific theories. The chapter shows that there are multiple stable components contained within a broad representation of evolutionary theory. It suggests that the philosophical analysis offered in the chapter regarding the structure of evolutionary theory (...)
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  2.  9
    Evolutionary Morphology and Evo-Devo: Hierarchy and Novelty.A. C. Love - 2006 - Theory in Biosciences 124:317–333.
    Although the role of morphology in evolutionary theory remains a subject of debate, assessing the contributions of morphological investigation to evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-devo) is a more circumscribed issue of direct relevance to ongoing research. Historical studies of morphologically oriented researchers and the formation of the Modern Synthesis in the Anglo-American context identify a recurring theme: the synthetic theory of evolution did not capture multiple levels of biological organization. When this feature is incorporated into a philosophical framework for explaining the (...)
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  3.  2
    Conceptual Change and Evolutionary Developmental Biology.A. C. Love - 2015 - In Conceptual Change in Biology: Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Evolution and Development. Springer. pp. 1-54.
    The 1981 Dahlem conference was a catalyst for contemporary evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-devo). This introductory chapter rehearses some of the details of the history surrounding the original conference and its associated edited volume, explicates the philosophical problem of conceptual change that provided the rationale for a workshop devoted to evaluating the epistemic revisions and transformations that occurred in the interim, explores conceptual change with respect to the concept of evolutionary novelty, and highlights some of the themes and patterns in the (...)
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  4.  8
    Morphological and Paleontological Perspectives for a History of Evo-Devo.A. C. Love - 2007 - In M. Laubichler & J. Maienschein (eds.), From Embryology to Evo-Devo: A History of Developmental Evolution. MIT Press. pp. 267–307.
    Exploring history pertinent to evolutionary developmental biology (hereafter, Evo-devo) is an exciting prospect given its current status as a cutting-edge field of research. The first and obvious question concerns where to begin searching for materials and sources. Since this new discipline adopts a moniker that intentionally juxtaposes ‘evolution’ and development’, individuals, disciplines, and institutional contexts relevant to the history of evolutionary studies and investigations of ontogeny prompt themselves. Each of these topics has received attention from historians and thus there is (...)
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  5.  8
    From Philosophy to Science (to Natural Philosophy): Evolutionary Developmental Perspectives.A. C. Love - 2008 - The Quarterly Review of Biology 83:65–76.
    This paper focuses on abstraction as a mode of reasoning that facilitates a productive relationship between philosophy and science. Using examples from evolutionary developmental biology, I argue that there are two areas where abstraction can be relevant to science: reasoning explication and problem clarification. The value of abstraction is characterized in terms of methodology (modeling or data gathering) and epistemology (explanatory evaluation or data interpretation).
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  6.  5
    The Erotetic Organization of Developmental Biology.A. C. Love - 2014 - In A. Minelli & T. Pradeu (eds.), Towards a Theory of Development. Oxford University Press. pp. 33–55.
    Developmental biology is the science of explaining how a variety of interacting processes generate the heterogeneous shapes, size, and structural features of an organism as it develops rom embryo to adult, or more generally throughout its life cycle (Love, 2008b; Minelli, 2011a). Although it is commonplace in philosophy to associate sciences with theories such that the individuation of a science is dependent on a constitutive theory or group of models, it is uncommon to find presentations of developmental biology making reference (...)
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  7.  7
    Developmental Biology.A. C. Love - 2015 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Developmental biology is the science of explaining how a variety of interacting processes generate an organism’s heterogeneous shapes, size, and structural features that arise on the trajectory from embryo to adult, or more generally throughout a life cycle. It represents an exemplary area of contemporary experimental biology that focuses on phenomena that have puzzled natural philosophers and scientists for more than two millennia.
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  8.  27
    Larval Ectoderm, Organizational Homology, and the Origins of Evolutionary Novelty.A. C. Love & R. A. Raff - 2006 - Journal of Experimental Zoology (Mol Dev Evol) 306:18–34.
    Comprehending the origin of marine invertebrate larvae remains a key domain of research for evolutionary biologists, including the repeated origin of direct developmental modes in echinoids. In order to address the latter question, we surveyed existing evidence on relationships of homology between the ectoderm territories of two closely related sea urchin species in the genus Heliocidaris that differ in their developmental mode. Additionally, we explored a recently articulated idea about homology called ‘organizational homology’ (Muller 2003. In: Muller GB, Newman SA, (...)
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  9.  3
    Explaining the Origins of Multicellularity: Between Evolutionary Dynamics and Developmental Mechanisms.A. C. Love - 2016 - In K. J. Niklas & S. A. Newman (eds.), Multicellularity: Origins and Evolution. MIT press. pp. 279–295.
    Overview The evolution of multicellularity raises questions regarding genomic and developmental commonalities and discordances, selective advantages and disadvantages, physical determinants of development, and the origins of morphological novelties. It also represents a change in the definition of individuality, because a new organism emerges from interactions among single cells. This volume considers these and other questions, with contributions that explore the origins and consequences of the evolution of multicellularity, addressing a range of topics, organisms, and experimental protocols. Each section focuses on (...)
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  10.  6
    Teaching Evolutionary Developmental Biology: Concepts, Problems, and Controversy.A. C. Love - 2013 - In K. Kampourakis (ed.), Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer. pp. 323-341.
    Although sciences are often conceptualized in terms of theory confirmation and hypothesis testing, an equally important dimension of scientific reasoning is the structure of problems that guide inquiry. This problem structure is evident in several concepts central to evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-devo)—constraints, modularity, evolvability, and novelty. Because problems play an important role in biological practice, they should be included in biological pedagogy, especially when treating the issue of scientific controversy. A key feature of resolving controversy is synthesizing methodologies from different (...)
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  11.  3
    Darwin’s Functional Reasoning and Homology.A. C. Love - 2011 - In M. Wheeler (ed.), 150 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s Impact on Contemporary Thought & Culture. SDSU Press. pp. 49–67.
    Scientists exhibit different styles in their reasoning about the natural world (e.g., experimental, historical, or statistical). These styles have been characterized, categorized, and combined in many ways throughout the history of science.
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  12.  7
    The Hedgehog, the Fox, and Reductionism in Biology. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2007 - Evolution 61:2736–2738.
  13.  10
    Exceeding Our Grasp: Science, History, and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives by P. Kyle Stanford. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):155-157.
  14.  4
    Darwin’s ‘Imaginary Illustrations’: Creatively Teaching Evolutionary Concepts and the Nature of Science.A. C. Love - 2010 - The American Biology Teacher 72:82–89.
    An overlooked feature of Darwin’s work is his use of “imaginary illustrations” to show that natural selection is competent to produce adaptive, evolutionary change. When set in the context of Darwin’s methodology, these thought.
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  15. Review: Massimo Pigliucci and Jonathan Kaplan: Making Sense of Evolution: The Conceptual Foundations of Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2008 - Mind 117 (465):201-205.
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  16.  18
    Reduction.A. Hütterman & A. C. Love - 2016 - In P. Humphries (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 460-484.
    Reduction and reductionism have been central philosophical topics in analytic philosophy of science for more than six decades. Together they encompass a diversity of issues from metaphysics and epistemology. This article provides an introduction to the topic that illuminates how contemporary epistemological discussions took their shape historically and limns the contours of concrete cases of reduction in specific natural sciences. The unity of science and the impulse to accomplish compositional reduction in accord with a layer-cake vision of the sciences, the (...)
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  17.  3
    Fostering Inquiry in Nonlaboratory Settings.E. L. Ingram, E. Lehman, A. C. Love & K. M. Polacek - 2004 - Journal of College Science Teaching 34:39-43.
    Inquiry is an important learning strategy, even for students who cannot or do not perform actual experiments. The authors describe two activities, other than experimentation, that they used in introductory biology learning groups to emphasize inquiry abilities. They also provide recommendations for creating additional inquiry activities.
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  18.  1
    A Kaleidoscopic View of Scientific Naturalism. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2014 - Choice 52 (3):1395.
  19.  5
    Co-Option and Dissociation in Larval Origins and Evolution: The Sea Urchin Larval Gut.A. C. Love, A. E. Lee, M. E. Andrews & R. A. Raff - 2008 - Evolution & Development 10:74–88.
    The origin of marine invertebrate larvae has been an area of controversy in developmental evolution for over a century. Here, we address the question of whether a pelagic “larval” or benthic “adult” morphology originated first in metazoan lineages by testing the hypothesis that particular gene co-option patterns will be associated with the origin of feeding, indirect developing larval forms. Empirical evidence bearing on this hypothesis is derivable from gene expression studies of the sea urchin larval gut of two closely related (...)
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  20.  1
    Cooperation Analyzed Interdisciplinarily. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2013 - Choice 51 (3):1470.
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  21. Christianity for Darwinians? [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2002 - Metascience 11:115-118.
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  22.  7
    Caution on the Plurality of Causation. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2014 - Choice 51 (9):4988.
  23.  4
    Developing a Rhetorical Account of Explanation. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2015 - Choice 52 (8):4168.
    Book review of "The Nature of Scientific Thinking: on Interpretation, Explanation and Understanding" by J. Faye. The nature of scientific explanation is a central topic of interest to philosophers but the literature has metamorphosed from a coherent body of key papers and examples into narrow and specialized discussions in different scientific disciplines.
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  24.  2
    Developmental Evolution of Novel Structures – Animals.A. C. Love & D. Urban - 2016 - In R. Kliman (ed.), Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Volume 3. Academic Press. pp. 136–145.
    The origination of novel structures has long been an intriguing topic for biologists. Over the past few decades it has served as a central theme in evolutionary developmental biology. Yet, definitions of evolutionary innovation and novelty are frequently debated and there remains disagreement about what kinds of causal factors best explain the origin of qualitatively new variation in the history of life. Here we examine aspects of these debates, survey three empirical case studies, and reflect on directions for future inquiry (...)
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  25.  11
    From Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum to Arabia and Antioch. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2013 - Evolution & Development 15:158-159.
    From Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum to Arabia and Antioch: a review of cells to civilizations: the principles of change that shape life -/- Cells to Civilizations: The Principles of Change That Shape Life, Coen, E. 2012. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. 312 pp. ISBN 978-0-691-14967-7.
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  26.  7
    Gene Expression Patterns in a Novel Animal Appendage: The Sea Urchin Pluteus Arm.A. C. Love, M. E. Lee & R. A. Raff - 2007 - Evolution & Development 9:51–68.
    The larval arms of echinoid plutei are used for locomotion and feeding. They are composed of internal calcite skeletal rods covered by an ectoderm layer bearing a ciliary band. Skeletogenesis includes an autonomous molecular differentiation program in primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs), initiated when PMCs leave the vegetal plate for the blastocoel, and a patterning of the differentiated skeletal units that requires molecular cues from the overlaying ectoderm. The arms represent a larval feature that arose in the echinoid lineage during the (...)
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  27.  7
    . Ignorance and Science: From Strange Juxtaposition to Essential Connection. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2012 - Science in Focus.
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  28.  28
    Looking Beyond Gene Concepts. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (2):247–250.
    Book Review: What Genes Can’t Do By Lenny Moss .
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  29.  3
    Methodological Pluralism About Causation in the Sciences. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2015 - Social Choice and Welfare 53 (11):1247.
    Book review of "Causality: Philosophical Theory Meets Scientific Practice" by P. Illari and F. Russo,.
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  30.  3
    Philosophy and Paleontology: Getting to Know Each Other. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2011 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  31. Evolvability, Plausibility, and Possibility. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2006 - BioScience 56:772–774.
    Judgments of plausibility involve appearance of the truth or reasonableness, which is always a function of background knowledge. What anyone will countenance is conditioned by what they already know (or think they know). Marc Kirschner (professor of systems biology at Harvard) and John Gerhart (professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California—Berkeley) aim to show that molecular, cellular, and developmental processes relevant to the generation of phenotypic variation in anatomy, physiology, and behavior demonstrate how evolutionary processes, especially (...)
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  32. Philosophy of Biology Exemplified. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2014 - Choice 51 (12):6737.
  33.  36
    Putting the Pieces Together. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2007 - Science 317:1502–1503.
  34.  1
    Revolutionary Evo-Devo? [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40:594*597.
    Essay review of David Arnold, "The Tropics and the Traveling Gaze: India, Landscape, and Science, 1800-1856" (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2006), xiv + 298 pp., illus.
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  35.  1
    Scientism Under Scrutiny. [REVIEW]A. C. Love - 2015 - Choice 53 (10):747.