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Alvin P. Cohen [36]Alix Cohen [28]Andrew I. Cohen [25]Andrew Jason Cohen [20]
Avner Cohen [18]A. Cohen [16]Ariel Cohen [15]Adir Cohen [13]

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Andrew Jason Cohen
Georgia State University
Alix Cohen
University of Edinburgh
Andrew I. Cohen
Georgia State University
Abraham Cohen
Santa Barbara City College
Arnon Cohen
University of Haifa
Annabel Cohen
University of Prince Edward Island
  1. Acting Intentionally and the Side-Effect Effect: 'Theory of Mind' and Moral Judgment.Joshua Knobe, Adam Cohen & Alan Leslie - 2006 - Psychological Science 17:421-427.
    The concept of acting intentionally is an important nexus where ‘theory of mind’ and moral judgment meet. Preschool children’s judgments of intentional action show a valence-driven asymmetry. Children say that a foreseen but disavowed side-effect is brought about 'on purpose' when the side-effect itself is morally bad but not when it is morally good. This is the first demonstration in preschoolers that moral judgment influences judgments of ‘on-purpose’ (as opposed to purpose influencing moral judgment). Judgments of intentional action are usually (...)
     
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  2.  83
    A Dual-Networks Architecture of Top-Down Control.Nico U. F. Dosenbach, Damien A. Fair, Alexander L. Cohen, Bradley L. Schlaggar & Steven E. Petersen - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (3):99-105.
  3.  4
    Encoding of Others’ Beliefs Without Overt Instruction.Adam S. Cohen & Tamsin C. German - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):356-363.
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  4. Think Generic! The Meaning and Use of Generic Sentences.Ariel Cohen - 1999 - Stanford: CSLI.
     
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  5.  68
    Compensation for Historic Injustices: Completing the Boxill and Sher Argument.Andrew I. Cohen - 2009 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (1):81-102.
  6. What Toleration Is.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2004 - Ethics 115 (1):68-95.
    Attempting to settle various debates from recent literature regarding its precise nature, I offer a detailed conceptual analysis of toleration. I begin by isolating toleration from other notions; this provides us some guidance by introducing the eight definitional conditions of toleration that I then explicate and defend. Together, these eight conditions indicate that toleration is an agent’s intentional and principled refraining from interfering with an opposed other (or their behavior, etc.) in situations of diversity, where the agent believes she has (...)
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  7. Commentary on Szmukler: Mental Illness, Dangerousness, and Involuntary Civil Commitment.Ken Levy & Alex Cohen - 2016 - In Daniel D. Moseley Gary J. Gala (ed.), Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections, and New Perspectives. Routledge. pp. 147-160.
    Prof. Cohen and I answer six questions: (1) Why do we lock people up? (2) How can involuntary civil commitment be reconciled with people's constitutional right to liberty? (3) Why don't we treat homicide as a public health threat? (4) What is the difference between legal and medical approaches to mental illness? (5) Why is mental illness required for involuntary commitment? (6) Where are we in our efforts to understand the causes of mental illness?
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  8. Kant’s Answer to the Question ‘What is Man?’ and its Implications for Anthropology.Alix A. Cohen - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):506-514.
    This paper examines Kant’s anthropological project and its relationship to his conception of ‘man’ in order to show that Kant’s answer to the question ‘what is man?’ entails a decisive re-evaluation of traditional conceptions of human nature. I argue that Kant redirects the question ‘what is man?’ away from defining man in terms of what he is, and towards defining him in terms of what he does, in particular through the distinction between three levels of what I will call ‘man’s (...)
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  9.  60
    What Does God Know? Supernatural Agents' Access to Socially Strategic and Non-Strategic Information.Benjamin G. Purzycki, Daniel N. Finkel, John Shaver, Nathan Wales, Adam B. Cohen & Richard Sosis - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):846-869.
    Current evolutionary and cognitive theories of religion posit that supernatural agent concepts emerge from cognitive systems such as theory of mind and social cognition. Some argue that these concepts evolved to maintain social order by minimizing antisocial behavior. If these theories are correct, then people should process information about supernatural agents’ socially strategic knowledge more quickly than non-strategic knowledge. Furthermore, agents’ knowledge of immoral and uncooperative social behaviors should be especially accessible to people. To examine these hypotheses, we measured response-times (...)
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  10. Generics, Frequency Adverbs, and Probability.Ariel Cohen - 1999 - Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (3):221-253.
    Generics and frequency statements are puzzling phenomena: they are lawlike, yet contingent. They may be true even in the absence of any supporting instances, and extending the size of their domain does not change their truth conditions. Generics and frequency statements are parametric on time, but not on possible worlds; they cannot be applied to temporary generalizations, and yet are contingent. These constructions require a regular distribution of events along the time axis. Truth judgments of generics vary considerably across speakers, (...)
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  11.  29
    On the Generic Use of Indefinite Singulars.Ariel Cohen - 2001 - Journal of Semantics 18 (3):183-209.
    The distribution of indefinite singular generics is much more restricted than that of bare plural generics. The former, unlike the latter, seem to require that the property predicated of their subject be, in some sense, ‘definitional’. Moreover, the two constructions exhibit different scopal behaviour, and differ in their felicity in conjunctions, questions, and expressions describing the speaker's confidence. I propose that the reason is that the two expressions, in fact, have rather different meanings. Carlson (1995) makes a distinction between inductivist (...)
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  12.  85
    Generics and Mental Representations.Ariel Cohen - 2004 - Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (5):529-556.
    It is widely agreed that generics tolerate exceptions. It turns out, however, that exceptions are tolerated only so long as they do not violate homogeneity: when the exceptions are not concentrated in a salient “chunk” of the domain of the generic. The criterion for salience of a chunk is cognitive: it is dependent on the way in which the domain is mentally represented. Findings of psychological experiments about the ways in which different domains are represented, and the actors affecting such (...)
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  13.  63
    Existential Generics.Ariel Cohen - 2004 - Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (2):137-168.
    While opinions on the semantic analysis of generics vary widely, most scholars agree that generics have a quasi-universal flavor. However, there are cases where generics receive what appears to be an existentialinterpretation. For example, B's response is true, even though only theplatypus and the echidna lay eggs: (1) A: Birds lay eggs. B: Mammals lay eggs too. In this paper I propose a uniform account of the semantics of generics,which accounts for their quasi-existential readings as well as for their more (...)
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  14.  10
    Dissociations of Personally Significant and Task-Relevant Distractors Inside and Outside the Focus of Attention: A Combined Behavioral and Psychophysiological Study.Nurit Gronau, Asher Cohen & Gershon Ben-Shakhar - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (4):512.
  15.  42
    Contractarianism, Other-Regarding Attitudes, and the Moral Standing of Nonhuman Animals.Andrew I. Cohen - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):188–201.
  16.  26
    Relative Readings of Many, Often, and Generics.Ariel Cohen - 2001 - Natural Language Semantics 9 (1):41-67.
    In addition to the familiar cardinal and proportional readings of many and few, there is yet another interpretation, the relative proportional reading. This reading, unlike the ordinary absolute proportional reading, is not conservative. Under the relative reading, 'Many ψs are φs' is true just in case the proportion of φs among ψs is greater than the proportion of φs among members of contextually given alternatives to ψ. I provide a definition of proportional readings that reduces the differences between absolute and (...)
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  17.  7
    A Reaction Time Advantage for Calculating Beliefs Over Public Representations Signals Domain Specificity for ‘Theory of Mind’.Adam S. Cohen & Tamsin C. German - 2010 - Cognition 115 (3):417-425.
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  18.  22
    Corrective Vs. Distributive Justice: The Case of Apologies.Andrew I. Cohen - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper considers the relation of corrective to distributive justice. I discuss the shortfalls of one sort of account that holds these are independent domains of justice. To support a more modest claim that these are sometimes independent domains of justice, I focus instead on the case of apologies. Apologies are sometimes among the measures specified by corrective justice. I argue that the sorts of injustices that apologies can help to correct need not always be departures from ideals specified by (...)
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  19. Music as a Source of Emotion in Film.Annabel J. Cohen - 2011 - In Patrik N. Juslin & John Sloboda (eds.), Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications. Oxford University Press.
     
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  20.  34
    Superlative Quantifiers as Modifiers of Meta-Speech Acts.Ariel Cohen & Manfred Krifka - 2010 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 6 (1):11.
    The superlative quantifiers, at least and at most, are commonly assumed to have the same truth-conditions as the comparative quantifiers more than and fewer than. However, as Geurts & Nouwen have demonstrated, this is wrong, and several theories have been proposed to account for them. In this paper we propose that superlative quantifiers are illocutionary operators; specifically, they modify meta-speech acts.Meta speech-acts are operators that do not express a speech act, but a willingness to make or refrain from making a (...)
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  21.  1
    Decision-Tree Models of Categorization Response Times, Choice Proportions, and Typicality Judgments.Daniel Lafond, Yves Lacouture & Andrew L. Cohen - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (4):833-855.
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  22.  43
    Topic, Focus, and the Interpretation of Bare Plurals.Ariel Cohen & Nomi Erteschik-Shir - 2002 - Natural Language Semantics 10 (2):125-165.
    In this paper we show that focus structure determines the interpretation of bare plurals in English: topic bare plurals are interpreted generically, focused bare plurals are interpreted existentially. When bare plurals are topics they must be specific, i.e. they refer to kinds. After type-shifting they introduce variables which can be bound by the generic quantifier, yielding characterizing generics. Existentially interpreted bare plurals are not variables, but denote properties that are incorporated into the predicate.The type of predicate determines the interpretation of (...)
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  23. What the Liberal State Should Tolerate Within Its Borders. [REVIEW]Andrew Jason Cohen - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):479-513.
    Two normative principles of toleration are offered, one individual-regarding, the other group-regarding. The first is John Stuart Mill’s harm principle; the other is “Principle T,” meant to be the harm principle writ large. It is argued that the state should tolerate autonomous sacrifices of autonomy, including instances where an individual rationally chooses to be enslaved, lobotomized, or killed. Consistent with that, it is argued that the state should tolerate internal restrictions within minority groups even where these prevent autonomy promotion of (...)
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  24. Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics.Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) - 2005 - Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  25.  7
    Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History.Alix Cohen - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Kant famously identified 'What is man?' as the fundamental question that encompasses the whole of philosophy. Yet surprisingly, there has been no concerted effort amongst Kant scholars to examine Kant's actual philosophy of man. This book, which is inspired by, and part of, the recent movement that focuses on the empirical dimension of Kant's works, is the first sustained attempt to extract from his writings on biology, anthropology and history an account of the human sciences, their underlying unity, their presuppositions (...)
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  26.  3
    Kant on Moral Feelings, Moral Desires and the Cultivation of Virtue.Alix Cohen - 2018 - In Sally Sedgwick & Dina Emundts (eds.), Begehren / Desire. De Gruyter. pp. 3-18.
    This paper argues that contrary to what is often thought, virtue for Kant is not just a matter of strength of will; it has an essential affective dimension. To support this claim, I show that certain affective dispositions, namely moral feelings and desires, are virtuous in the sense that they are constitutive of virtue at the affective level. There is thus an intrinsic connection between an agent’s practice of virtue and the cultivation of her affective dispositions.
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  27.  4
    Kant on Science and Normativity.Alix Cohen - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 1.
    The aim of this paper is to explore Kant’s account of normativity through the prism of the distinction between the natural and the human sciences. Although the pragmatic orientation of the human sciences is often defined in contrast with the theoretical orientation of the natural sciences, I show that they are in fact regulated by one and the same norm, namely reason’s demand for autonomy.
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  28.  25
    Contractarianism and Interspecies Welfare Conflicts.Andrew I. Cohen - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):227-257.
    In this essay I describe how contractarianism might approach interspecies welfare conflicts. I start by discussing a contractarian account of the moral status of nonhuman animals. I argue that contractors can agree to norms that would acknowledge the of some animals. I then discuss how the norms emerging from contractarian agreement might constrain any comparison of welfare between humans and animals. Contractarian agreement is likely to express some partiality to humans in a way that discounts the welfare of some or (...)
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  29.  6
    Being Clean and Acting Dirty: The Paradoxical Effect of Self-Cleansing.Thalma E. Lobel, Allon Cohen, Lior Kalay Shahin, Shimon Malov, Yaniv Golan & Shani Busnach - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (4):307-313.
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  30.  99
    Reviews : Clifford Geertz, Works and Lives: The Anthropologist as Author, Oxford: Polity Press, 1988, £19.50, Vi + 157 Pp. [REVIEW]Anthony P. Cohen - 1989 - History of the Human Sciences 2 (3):395-397.
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  31. The Association of Religiosity and Political Conservatism: The Role of Political Engagement.Ariel Malka, Yphtach Lelkes, Sanjay Srivastava, Adam B. Cohen & Dale T. Miller - 2012 - Political Psychology 33 (2):275-299.
     
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  32.  27
    Notions of Sameness by Default and Their Application to Anaphora, Vagueness, and Uncertain Reasoning.Ariel Cohen, Michael Kaminski & Johann A. Makowsky - 2008 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (3):285-306.
    We motivate and formalize the idea of sameness by default: two objects are considered the same if they cannot be proved to be different. This idea turns out to be useful for a number of widely different applications, including natural language processing, reasoning with incomplete information, and even philosophical paradoxes. We consider two formalizations of this notion, both of which are based on Reiter’s Default Logic. The first formalization is a new relation of indistinguishability that is introduced by default. We (...)
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  33.  29
    Must Rights Impose Enforceable Positive Duties?Andrew I. Cohen - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):264–276.
  34. In Defence of Hume's Historical Method.Alix Cohen - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):489 – 502.
    A tradition among certain Hume scholars, best known as the ‘New Humeans’, proposes a novel reading of Hume’s work, and in particular of his conception of causality.2 The purpose of this paper is to conduct a similar move regarding Hume’s historical method. It is similar for two reasons: firstly, it is intended to reintegrate Hume’s theory into present-day debates on the nature of history; and secondly, the reading I propose is directed against the standard interpretation of Hume’s history. This interpretation (...)
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  35.  10
    Overliving.Andrew B. Cohen - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (5):5-5.
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  36.  15
    Superlative Quantifiers and Meta-Speech Acts.Ariel Cohen & Manfred Krifka - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (1):41-90.
    Recent research has shown that the superlative quantifiers at least and at most do not have the same type of truth conditions as the comparative quantifiers more than and fewer than. We propose that superlative quantifiers are interpreted at the level of speech acts. We relate them to denegations of speech acts, as in I don’t promise to come, which we analyze as excluding the speech act of a promise to come. Calling such conversational acts that affect future permissible speech (...)
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  37.  36
    No Alternative to Alternatives.A. Cohen - 2009 - Journal of Semantics 26 (1):1-48.
    Rooth's theory of focus requires, in addition to the ordinary semantic value of an expression, the focus semantic value, which is a set of alternatives generated by focus. Rooth claims that the union of the focus semantic value is accommodated into the restrictor of an adverbial quantifier. More recently, however, some researchers have argued convincingly that what is accommodated is, in fact, the existential presupposition induced by focus. It would appear, then, that there is no need for assuming the focus (...)
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  38.  3
    Feminist Interpretations of Ayn Rand.Andrew Cohen - 1999
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  39.  5
    Contractarianism and Interspecies Welfare Conflicts: Andrew I. Cohen.Andrew I. Cohen - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):227-257.
    In this essay I describe how contractarianism might approach interspecies welfare conflicts. I start by discussing a contractarian account of the moral status of nonhuman animals. I argue that contractors can agree to norms that would acknowledge the “moral standing” of some animals. I then discuss how the norms emerging from contractarian agreement might constrain any comparison of welfare between humans and animals. Contractarian agreement is likely to express some partiality to humans in a way that discounts the welfare of (...)
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  40.  1
    Feelings Don't Come Easy: Studies on the Effortful Nature of Feelings.Assaf Kron, Yaacov Schul, Asher Cohen & Ran R. Hassin - 2010 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139 (3):520-534.
  41.  34
    A Defense of Strong Voluntarism.Andrew Jason Cohen - 1998 - American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (3):251-265.
    Critics of liberalism in the past two decades have argued that the fact that we are necessarily "situated" or "embedded" means that we can not always choose our own ends (for example, our conceptions of the good or our loyalties to others). Some suggest that we simply discover ourselves with these "connections." If correct, this would argue against (Rawlsian) hypothetical contract models and liberalism more broadly, make true impartiality impossible, and give support to traditionalist views like those of Alasdair MacIntyre, (...)
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  42.  39
    Kant on Anthropology and Alienology: The Opacity of Human Motivation and its Anthropological Implications.Alix Cohen - 2008 - Kantian Review 13 (2):85-106.
    According to Kant, the opacity of human motivation takes two distinct forms – a psychological form: man ‘can never, even by the most strenuous self-examination, get entirely behind [his] covert incentives’ – and a social form: ‘everyone in our race finds it advisable to be on his guard, and not to reveal himself completely’. In other words, first, men's ‘interior’ cannot be entirely revealed to themselves and, second, they tend not to reveal their ‘interior’ to others. A number of Kant (...)
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  43.  31
    The Notion of Moral Progress in Hume’s Philosophy: Does Hume Have a Theory of Moral Progress.Alix Cohen - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):109-127.
    This paper aims to show that the notion of moral progress makes sense in Hume’s philosophy. And even though Hume suggests that this question is not central, in showing why it is not the case, I will conclude that, in concentrating on the question of the progress of civilisation, Hume was expressing a view on moral progress. To support this claim, I will begin by defending the claim that the notion of moral progress itself is consistent within Hume’s philosophical principles. (...)
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  44.  14
    On the Possibility of Corporate Apologies.Andrew I. Cohen & Jennifer A. Samp - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):741-762.
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  45. Kant's Biological Conception of History.Alix Cohen - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these features entailing important methodological (...)
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  46.  46
    How Are Alternatives Computed?A. Cohen - 1999 - Journal of Semantics 16 (1):43-65.
    It is widely assumed that focusing a phrase indicates that alternatives to the phrase are considered. The question is, how are alternatives to a given phrase determined? There are a number of proposed answers to this question (Rooth 1985, 1992; von Stechow 1989; Jacobs 1983, among others). These accounts, however, typically deal only with logically simple phrases; when more complex phrases are considered, they turn out to be inadequate. Current theories fail to provide a principled relation between the alternatives induced (...)
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  47. Compensation for Historic Injustices: Completing the Boxill and Sher Argument.Andrew I. Cohen - 2009 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (1):81-102.
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  48. Kant's Antinomy of Reflective Judgment: A Re-Evaluation.Alix Cohen - 2004 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):183.
    The aim of this paper is to show that there is a genuine difficulty in Kant’s argument regarding the connection between mechanism and teleology. But this difficulty is not the one that is usually underlined. Far from consisting in a contradiction between the first and the third Critique, I argue that the genuine difficulty is intrinsic to the antinomy of reflective judgement: rather than having any hope of resolving anything, it consists in an inescapable conflict. In order to support this (...)
     
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  49.  38
    Defending Liberalism Against the Anomie Challenge.Andrew J. Cohen - 2004 - Social Theory and Practice 30 (3):391-427.
    Some claim that liberalism’s neutrality toward the Good encourages anomie, thereby disallowing social confirmation of beliefs, leaving the individual with an uncertainty about judgments that is opposed to confidence and self-respect. This is the “anomie challenge.” I begin by discussing toleration and neutrality and motivating the problem. I then look at responses to the challenge by liberal pluralists and liberalism’s critics. After dismissing both, I argue that the right to choose is the good to be advocated and that it allows (...)
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  50.  96
    Communitarianism 'Social Constitution,' and Autonomy.Andrew Jason Cohen - 1999 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (2):121–135.
    Communitarians like Alasdair MacIntyre, Charles Taylor, and Michael Sandel, defend what we may call the ‘social constitution thesis.’ This is the view that participation in society makes us what we are. This claim, however, is ambiguous. In an attempt to shed some light on it and to better understand the impact its truth would have on our beliefs regarding autonomy, I offer four possible ways it could be understood and four corresponding senses of individual independence and autonomy. I also indicate (...)
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