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  1.  13
    Koes.A. D. Ure - 1951 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 71:194-197.
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  2.  17
    Attic Black-Figured Lekythoi.C. H. Emilie Haspels & A. D. Ure - 1938 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 58 (2):256-259.
  3.  9
    Boeotian Haloa.A. D. Ure - 1949 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 69:18-24.
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  4.  10
    Sixth- and Fifth-Century Pottery From Excavations Made at Rhitsona.H. G. G. P., R. M. Burrows, P. N. Ure & A. D. Ure - 1927 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 47:306.
  5.  1
    A Boeotian Krater in Trinity College, Cambridge.A. D. Ure - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (2):314-315.
  6.  8
    A Corinthian Cup and a Euboean Lekythos.A. D. Ure - 1968 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 88:140-141.
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  7.  13
    Demeter and Dionysos on Acrocorinth.A. D. Ure - 1969 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 89:120-121.
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  8.  18
    Excavations at Olynthus. Part XIII. Vases Found in 1934 and 1938. [REVIEW]A. D. Ure & David M. Robinson - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:185-186.
  9. Euboean Lekanai.A. D. Ure - 1960 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 80:160.
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  10.  2
    Four Lekythoi in Chalcis.A. D. Ure - 1962 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 82:138-140.
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  11.  3
    Krokotos and White Heron.A. D. Ure - 1955 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:90-103.
  12.  9
    The God with the Winnowing-Fan.A. D. Ure - 1952 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 72:121-121.
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  13.  7
    Threshing-Floor or Vineyard.A. D. Ure - 1955 - Classical Quarterly 5 (3-4):225-.
    The word is generally regarded as having two distinct and separate meanings: threshing-floor, and garden, orchard, or vineyard. Like the classical the word must originally have denoted a threshing-floor. How the second, and apparently incongruous, meaning became attached to it has never been explained. Both are found in Homer. In the Iliad the horses of Achilles trample down the dead like oxen treading the barley on the well-built threshing-floor; the arrow rebounds from the breastplate of Menelaos like beans or chickpeas (...)
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