Results for 'A. E. While'

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  1.  67
    Research Ethics Committees at Work: The Experience of One Multi-Location Study.A. E. While - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):352-355.
    OBJECTIVES: To report the outcome of applications to 43 research ethics committees. SETTING: Four regional health authorities in England. FINDINGS: The research ethics committees varied considerably in their practices. The time lapse until notification of the outcome of the approval ranged from just under one week to 23 weeks with a mean of 8.6 weeks. Four research ethics committees failed to notify the research team of an outcome of their request for approval. CONCLUSION: A national research ethics committee is needed (...)
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  2.  10
    The Perceptual Process.A. E. J. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):372-373.
    Garnett attempts to defend realism while accepting much of what sense-data theorist have had to say. He does this by tracing the origin of our belief in external objects to the finding of "centres of resistance" in the experience of effort and resistance, these centres being symbolized by sensory qualia. Since the centres are found in experience they are not unknowable Lockean substances, and since the resistance is something over and above sensations of pressure they are not phenomenalistic patterns (...)
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  3.  16
    The Perceptual Process. [REVIEW]E. J. A. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (2):372-373.
    Garnett attempts to defend realism while accepting much of what sense-data theorist have had to say. He does this by tracing the origin of our belief in external objects to the finding of "centres of resistance" in the experience of effort and resistance, these centres being symbolized by sensory qualia. Since the centres are found in experience they are not unknowable Lockean substances, and since the resistance is something over and above sensations of pressure they are not phenomenalistic patterns (...)
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  4.  14
    A Qualitative Study on Experiences and Perspectives of Members of a Dutch Medical Research Ethics Committee.Rien M. J. P. A. Janssens, Wieke E. Van der Borg, Maartje Ridder, Mariëlle Diepeveen, Benjamin Drukarch & Guy A. M. Widdershoven - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (1):63-75.
    The aim of this research was to gain insight into the experiences and perspectives of individual members of a Medical Research Ethics Committee regarding their individual roles and possible tensions within and between these roles. We conducted a qualitative interview study among members of a large MREC, supplemented by a focus group meeting. Respondents distinguish five roles: protector, facilitator, educator, advisor and assessor. Central to the role of protector is securing valid informed consent and a proper risk-benefit analysis. The role (...)
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  5.  2
    The Ethics of Practicing Defensive Medicine in Jordan: A Diagnostic Study.Hassan A. E. Al-Balas & Qosay A. E. Al-Balas - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundDefensive medicine practice refers to the ordering or prescription of unnecessary treatments or tests while avoiding risky procedures for critically ill patients with the aim to alleviate the physician’s legal responsibility and preserve reputation. Although DM practice is recognized, its dimensions are still uncertain. The subject has been highly investigated in developed countries, but unfortunately, many developing countries are unable to investigate it properly. DM has many serious ramifications, exemplified by the increase in treatment costs for patients and health (...)
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  6.  1
    The Codex Lipsiensis of Manilivs.A. E. Housman - 1921 - Classical Quarterly 15 (3-4):175-.
    Professor J. van Wageningen has sent me a review of my fourth volume of Manilius which he has published in Museum vol. 28 pp. 173–7. I never contradict the taradiddles usual in reviews, because, if the reader thinks it worth his while, he can find out for himself whether they are true or no, and if he chooses to believe them without enquiry, it serves him right. But when he is fed with false information about a MS which is (...)
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  7.  42
    The Profit Motive in Medicine.D. W. Brock & A. E. Buchanan - 1987 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (1):1-35.
    The ethical implications of the growth of for-profit health care institutions are complex. Two major moral criticisms of for-profit medicine are analyzed. The first claim is that for-profit health care institutions fail to fulfill their obligations to do their fair share in providing health care to the poor and so exacerbate the problem of access to health care. The second claim is that profit seeking in medicine will damage the physician-patient relationship, creating conflicts of interest that will diminish the quality (...)
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  8.  21
    What Ethical and Legal Principles Should Guide the Genotyping of Children as Part of a Personalised Screening Programme for Common Cancer?N. Hallowell, S. Chowdhury, A. E. Hall, P. Pharoah, H. Burton & N. Pashayan - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):163-167.
    Increased knowledge of the gene–disease associations contributing to common cancer development raises the prospect of population stratification by genotype and other risk factors. Individual risk assessments could be used to target interventions such as screening, treatment and health education. Genotyping neonates, infants or young children as part of a systematic programme would improve coverage and uptake, and facilitate a screening package that maximises potential benefits and minimises harms including overdiagnosis. This paper explores the potential justifications and risks of genotyping children (...)
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  9.  39
    Women's Views About Participating in Research While Pregnant.A. D. Lyerly, E. E. Namey, B. Gray, G. Swamy & R. R. Faden - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (4):1-8.
    Pregnant women and their interests have been underrepresented in health research. Little is known about issues relevant to women considering research participation during pregnancy. We performed in-depth interviews with 22 women enrolled in either one of two trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the H1N1 vaccine during pregnancy. Three themes characterized women’s decisions to participate in research: they valued early access to the vaccine, they perceived a safety advantage when participating in (...)
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  10.  41
    The Cosmological Arguments: A Spectrum of Opinion.E. A. R. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (2):383-383.
    This volume can be considered a supplement to A. Plantinga's similar book on the Ontological argument, and includes classic texts and contemporary commentary on both the Cosmological and the Teleological arguments, though there is no extended consideration of the problem of evil as it bears particularly on the Teleological argument. Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hume and Kant give the classic arguments for and against the Cosmological argument. Geach, Edwards, Plantinga, and Penelhum provide the contemporary commentary. Paley, Hume, Mill, and Kant state (...)
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  11.  77
    Imperfect Duties and Corporate Philanthropy: A Kantian Approach.David E. Ohreen & Roger A. Petry - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):367-381.
    Nonprofit organizations play a crucial role in society. Unfortunately, many such organizations are chronically underfunded and struggle to meet their objectives. These facts have significant implications for corporate philanthropy and Kant’s notion of imperfect duties. Under the concept of imperfect duties, businesses would have wide discretion regarding which charities receive donations, how much money to give, and when such donations take place. A perceived problem with imperfect duties is that they can lead to moral laxity; that is, a failure on (...)
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  12.  5
    The Cosmological Arguments: A Spectrum of Opinion. [REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (2):383-383.
    This volume can be considered a supplement to A. Plantinga's similar book on the Ontological argument, and includes classic texts and contemporary commentary on both the Cosmological and the Teleological arguments, though there is no extended consideration of the problem of evil as it bears particularly on the Teleological argument. Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hume and Kant give the classic arguments for and against the Cosmological argument. Geach, Edwards, Plantinga, and Penelhum provide the contemporary commentary. Paley, Hume, Mill, and Kant state (...)
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  13.  11
    Universals: A New Look at an Old Problem. [REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (2):383-383.
    After setting up the classic Platonic doctrine of universals, Zabeeh reviews the Aristotelian and British empiricist attacks on this doctrine, and the doctrine of general ideas. Zabeeh's own "new" look consists in a reworking of many currently familiar ideas to come up with the position that universals are the meanings of general terms and the meanings of general terms are the way in which they are used. While this may do as the start of a semantical theory of universals, (...)
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  14.  8
    Leibniz: A Guide to His Philosophy. [REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):348-349.
    This is a competent and sympathetic introduction to the life and thought of Leibniz. It reads, on the surface, like an encyclopedia article or a chapter in a critical history of philosophy. But there is a meta-critical strain governing the exposition. Within a limited space, Van Peursen has molded a presentation which manages to balance considerations of what was central to Leibniz' philosophy from Leibniz' point of view with issues which have special relevance for contemporary philosophy. For example, Van Peursen (...)
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  15.  57
    Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock. A Critical Introduction to the Philosophy of Gottlob Frege. Aldershot, Hampshire, and Burlington, Vermont: Ashgate Publishing, 2006. Isbn 978-0-7546-5471-1. Pp. X+157. [REVIEW]P. A. Ebert - 2011 - Philosophia Mathematica 19 (3):363-367.
    Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock's critical introduction to the philosophy of Gottlob Frege is based on twenty-five years of teaching Frege's philosophy at the University of Puerto Rico. It developed from an earlier publication by Rosado Haddock on Frege's philosophy which was, however, available only in Spanish. This introduction to Frege is meant to steer a path between the two main approaches to Frege studies: on the one hand, we have interpretations of Frege which portray him as a neo-Kantian and thus (...)
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  16.  10
    Body, Soul, Spirit: A Survey of the Mind-Body Problem. [REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):550-550.
    A dialectically rather than chronologically ordered survey: it moves first through the outright dualism of Descartes, to the primacy-of-soul position of Plato, and then to the extremes of Feuerbachian materialism and Berkeleyean immaterialism. Then, returning to pre-philosophical foundations in an attempt to recapture the lived phenomenon of body-soul unity that each of the above philosophers acknowledged, but lost in a welter of reductive abstractions, Van Peursen considers the non-dualistic and non-reductivist conceptions of primitive man, Homeric man, and Biblical man. Coming (...)
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  17.  83
    The Perception-Cognition Border: A Case for Architectural Division.E. J. Green - 2020 - Philosophical Review 129 (3):323-393.
    A venerable view holds that a border between perception and cognition is built into our cognitive architecture and that this imposes limits on the way information can flow between them. While the deliverances of perception are freely available for use in reasoning and inference, there are strict constraints on information flow in the opposite direction. Despite its plausibility, this approach to the perception-cognition border has faced criticism in recent years. This article develops an updated version of the architectural approach, (...)
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  18.  23
    Taking Credit for Success: The Phenomenology of Control in a Goal-Directed Task.John A. Dewey, Adriane E. Seiffert & Thomas H. Carr - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):48-62.
    We studied how people determine when they are in control of objects. In a computer task, participants moved a virtual boat towards a goal using a joystick to investigate how subjective control is shaped by (1) correspondence between motor actions and the visual consequences of those actions, and (2) attainment of higher-level goals. In Experiment 1, random discrepancies from joystick input (noise) decreased judgments of control (JoCs), but discrepancies that brought the boat closer to the goal and increased success (the (...)
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  19.  83
    Moore's Defence of Common Sense: A Reappraisal After Fifty Years: R. E. Tully.R. E. Tully - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (197):289-306.
    G. E. Moore's ‘A Defence of Common Sense’ has generated the kind of interest and contrariety which often accompany what is new, provocative, and even important in philosophy. Moore himself reportedly agreed with Wittgenstein's estimate that this was his best article, while C. D. Broad has lamented its very great but largely unfortunate influence. Although the essay inspired Wittgenstein to explore the basis of Moore's claim to know many propositions of common sense to be true, A. J. Ayer judges (...)
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  20.  17
    Locke and Berkeley: A Collection of Critical Essays. [REVIEW]E. A. R. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):160-160.
    Volume VI in Doubleday's Modern Studies in Philosophy series. Martin is responsible for the ten Locke essays, Armstrong for the twelve on Berkeley. The essays on Locke are by Ryle, Yolton, Jackson, Barnes, Bennett, Flew, Monson, Macpherson, and Ryan. The last three cover Locke's political philosophy while the others inevitably concern themselves with Locke's psychology and epistemology. The Berkeley essays are by Broad, Luce, Grave, Marc-Wogau, Cummins, Mabbott, Bennett, Furlong, Beardsley, Thomson, and Popper. Popper's essay is on "Berkeley as (...)
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  21.  6
    A Qualitative Study on Experiences and Perspectives of Members of a Dutch Medical Research Ethics Committee.Rien M. J. P. A. Janssens, Wieke E. van der Borg, Maartje Ridder, Mariëlle Diepeveen, Benjamin Drukarch & Guy A. M. Widdershoven - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (1):63-75.
    The aim of this research was to gain insight into the experiences and perspectives of individual members of a Medical Research Ethics Committee regarding their individual roles and possible tensions within and between these roles. We conducted a qualitative interview study among members of a large MREC, supplemented by a focus group meeting. Respondents distinguish five roles: protector, facilitator, educator, advisor and assessor. Central to the role of protector is securing valid informed consent and a proper risk-benefit analysis. The role (...)
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  22. A Dispositional Theory of Possibility.Andrea Borghini & Neil E. Williams - 2008 - Dialectica 62 (1):21–41.
    – The paper defends a naturalistic version of modal actualism according to which what is metaphysically possible is determined by dispositions found in the actual world. We argue that there is just one world—this one—and that all genuine possibilities are anchored by the dispositions exemplified in this world. This is the case regardless of whether or not those dispositions are manifested. As long as the possibility is one that would obtain were the relevant disposition manifested, it is a genuine possibility. (...)
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  23. Um Problema a Respeito de Subst'ncia E Relativo Em Aristóteles.Christopher Shields & Paulo Ferreira - 2003 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 13 (2).
    If form qualifies as substance, as it is claimed in Metaphysics, then we seem to have a problem: a form appears to be a relative, while evidently no relative is a substance. At any rate, Aristotle had held in the Categories that no primary substance could be a relative; so, if it turns out that form in the Metaphysics is primary substance, then either Aristotle has contradicted himself or else he has revised his categorial ontology to the point where (...)
     
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  24.  55
    Substance and Selfhood: E. J. Lowe.E. J. Lowe - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (255):81-99.
    How could the self be a substance? There are various ways in which it could be, some familiar from the history of philosophy. I shall be rejecting these more familiar substantivalist approaches, but also the non-substantival theories traditionally opposed to them. I believe that the self is indeed a substance—in fact, that it is a simple or noncomposite substance—and, perhaps more remarkably still, that selves are, in a sense, self-creating substances. Of course, if one thinks of the notion of substance (...)
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  25.  31
    Event-Related Potential Indicators of the Dynamic Unconscious.Howard Shevrin, W. J. Williams, R. E. Marshall & Linda A. Brakel - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (3):340-66.
    The present study applies a new method for investigating dynamic unconscious processes. The method consists of selection of words from patient interview and test protocols that in the clinicians' judgments capture the patients' conscious symptom experience and the hypothetical unconscious conflict related to the symptom, subliminal and supraliminal presentation of these words, signal analysis of event-related potentials obtained to the word presentations. Eight phobics and three patients suffering from pathological grief reactions served as subjects. A time-frequency ERP analysis revealed that (...)
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  26.  16
    The Problem of Embodiment: Some Contributions to a Phenomenology of the Body. [REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):604-605.
    Zaner's "contributions" are expository, critical, and original, in that order of extension. The major part of the text is taken up with an exposition and criticism of the theories of embodiment of Marcel, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty, with a strong emphasis on the unacknowledged borrowings of the latter two from Marcel-and, to a less obvious, but equally as important extent, of all three from Bergson. "Embodiment" is taken as a technical term referring to the on-going process by which consciousness relates itself (...)
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  27.  64
    A Consumer‐Based Teleosemantics for Animal Signals.Ulrich E. Stegmann - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):864-875.
    Ethological theory standardly attributes representational content to animal signals. In this article I first assess whether Ruth Millikan’s teleosemantic theory accounts for the content of animal signals. I conclude that it does not, because many signals do not exhibit the required sort of cooperation between signal‐producing and signal‐consuming devices. It is then argued that Kim Sterelny’s proposal, while not requiring cooperation, sometimes yields the wrong content. Finally, I outline an alternative view, according to which consumers alone are responsible for (...)
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  28.  29
    Placebo Acupuncture as a Form of Ritual Touch Healing: A Neurophenomenological Model.Catherine E. Kerr, Jessica R. Shaw, Lisa A. Conboy, John M. Kelley, Eric Jacobson & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):784-791.
    Evidence that placebo acupuncture is an effective treatment for chronic pain presents a puzzle: how do placebo needles appearing to patients to penetrate the body, but instead sitting on the skin’s surface in the manner of a tactile stimulus, evoke a healing response? Previous accounts of ritual touch healing in which patients often described enhanced touch sensations suggest an embodied healing mechanism. In this qualitative study, we asked a subset of patients in a singleblind randomized trial in irritable bowel syndrome (...)
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  29.  2
    Postpartum and Post-Abortion Contraceptive Use Among Unmarried Young Women in Ghana.D. Yaw Atiglo & Adriana A. E. Biney - 2021 - Journal of Biosocial Science 53 (3):459-470.
    Pregnancy outcomes impact subsequent contraceptive behaviour. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between previous pregnancy outcomes and subsequent contraceptive behaviours among unmarried young women intending to delay childbearing. Using data from the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey, among 1118 sexually experienced, fecund and non-pregnant unmarried women aged 15–24 years, the study assessed how childbirth and abortion are related to sexual abstinence and use of modern contraception. While about 70% of unmarried young women were nulligravid, (...)
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  30.  64
    Beyond Consent: Building Trusting Relationships With Diverse Populations in Precision Medicine Research.Stephanie A. Kraft, Mildred K. Cho, Katherine Gillespie, Meghan Halley, Nina Varsava, Kelly E. Ormond, Harold S. Luft, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (4):3-20.
    With the growth of precision medicine research on health data and biospecimens, research institutions will need to build and maintain long-term, trusting relationships with patient-participants. While trust is important for all research relationships, the longitudinal nature of precision medicine research raises particular challenges for facilitating trust when the specifics of future studies are unknown. Based on focus groups with racially and ethnically diverse patients, we describe several factors that influence patient trust and potential institutional approaches to building trustworthiness. Drawing (...)
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  31.  56
    Gender and Ethical Orientation: A Test of Gender and Occupational Socialization Theories. [REVIEW]E. Sharon Mason & Peter E. Mudrack - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (6):599 - 604.
    Ethics and associated values influence not only managerial behavior but also managerial success (England and Lee, 1973). Gender socialization theory hypothesizes gender differences in ethics variables whether or not individuals are full time employees; occupational socialization hypothesizes gender similarity in employees. The conflicting hypotheses were investigated using questionnaire responses from a sample of 308 individuals. Analysis of variance and hierarchical regression yielded unexpected results. Although no significant gender differences emerged in individuals lacking full time employment, significant differences existed between employed (...)
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  32.  2
    A Cross-Cultural Investigation Into the Influence of Eye Gaze on Working Memory for Happy and Angry Faces.Samantha E. A. Gregory, Stephen R. H. Langton, Sakiko Yoshikawa & Margaret C. Jackson - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (8):1561-1572.
    Previous long-term memory research found that angry faces were more poorly recognised when encoded with averted vs. direct gaze, while memory for happy faces was unaffected by gaze. Contrasti...
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  33.  36
    The Search for a Quantum KAM Theorem.L. E. Reichl & W. A. Lin - 1987 - Foundations of Physics 17 (7):689-697.
    The complex mechanisms by which nonlinear classical conservative systems undergo a transition from quasiperiodic to chaotic behavior are now fairly well understood. This transition is associated with a breakdown of quasi-constants of motion (KAM surfaces). There is growing evidence that similar mechanisms may govern the behavior of quantum systems. While K-type mixing behavior has not yet been found, there does appear to be a transition associated with the destruction of a quantum quasi-constant of motion (quantum KAM states) which changes (...)
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  34.  43
    A New E-ID Card and Online Authentication in Spain.Alexander Heichlinger & Patricia Gallego - 2010 - Identity in the Information Society 3 (1):43-64.
    This paper describes the introduction of a new electronic identity card including an electronic identity (EID) for local physical and online authentication in 2006. The most significant difference to any European country is the decentralized issuing at 256 police stations employing an automatic printing machine. This is the most visible element in a high degree continuation, as the previous paper based ID cards were also personalized and issued at the police stations. Similarly the attributes defining the identity and the legal (...)
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  35.  38
    An Empirical Study on the Preferred Size of the Participant Information Sheet in Research.E. E. Antoniou, H. Draper, K. Reed, A. Burls, T. R. Southwood & M. P. Zeegers - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):557-562.
    Background Informed consent is a requirement for all research. It is not, however, clear how much information is sufficient to make an informed decision about participation in research. Information on an online questionnaire about childhood development was provided through an unfolding electronic participant sheet in three levels of information. Methods 552 participants, who completed the web-based survey, accessed and spent time reading the participant information sheet (PIS) between July 2008 and November 2009. The information behaviour of the participants was investigated. (...)
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  36.  10
    The Efficacy of Regulation as a Function of Psychological Fit: Reexamining the Hard Law/Soft Law Continuum.Cynthia A. Williams & Deborah E. Rupp - 2011 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 12 (2):581-602.
    Much of the legal literature discusses regulation and regulatory forms with a seemingly implicit assumption that "those to be influenced" are inherently self-interested and thus motivated to comply with legal structures only when there are sufficient external incentives to do so. This view of the person is inconsistent with recent perspectives in the field of psychology. A law and morality perspective, coupled with insights from the field of psychology, asserts that influence, compliance, and motivation are far more complex than this (...)
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  37. How to Avoid Solipsism While Remaining an Idealist: Lessons From Berkeley and Dharmakirti.Jeremy E. Henkel - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):58-73.
    This essay examines the strategies that Berkeley and Dharmakīrti utilize to deny that idealism entails solipsism. Beginning from similar arguments for the non-existence of matter, the two philosophers employ markedly different strategies for establishing the existence of other minds. This difference stems from their responses to the problem of intersubjective agreement. While Berkeley’s reliance on his Cartesian inheritance does allow him to account for intersubjective agreement without descending into solipsism, it nevertheless prevents him from establishing the existence of other (...)
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  38. Can There Be A Feminist Science?Helen E. Longino - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (3):51 - 64.
    This paper explores a number of recent proposals regarding "feminist science" and rejects a content-based approach in favor of a process-based approach to characterizing feminist science. Philosophy of science can yield models of scientific reasoning that illuminate the interaction between cultural values and ideology and scientific inquiry. While we can use these models to expose masculine and other forms of bias, we can also use them to defend the introduction of assumptions grounded in feminist political values.
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  39.  20
    Ethical Reasoning Concerning the Feeding of Severely Demented Patients: An International Perspective.A. Norberg, M. Hirschfeld, B. Davidson, A. Davis, S. Lauri, J. Y. Lin, L. Phillips, E. Pittman, R. Vander Laan & L. Ziv - 1994 - Nursing Ethics 1 (1):3-13.
    Structured interviews were held with 149 registered nurses in seven countries in America, Asia, Australia and Europe concerning the feeding of severely demented patients who do not accept food. The most common reasons for nurses being willing to change their decision to feed or not to feed were an order from the medical head, a request from the patient's husband and/or the staff meeting. There was a connection between the willingness to feed and the ranking of ethical principles. Nurses who (...)
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  40.  27
    Understanding Preferences for Disclosure of Individual Biomarker Results Among Participants in a Longitudinal Birth Cohort.S. E. Wilson, E. R. Baker, A. C. Leonard, M. H. Eckman & B. P. Lanphear - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):736-740.
    Background To describe the preferences for disclosure of individual biomarker results among mothers participating in a longitudinal birth cohort. Methods We surveyed 343 mothers that participated in the Health Outcomes and Measures of the Environment Study about their biomarker disclosure preferences. Participants were told that the study was measuring pesticide metabolites in their biological specimens, and that the health effects of these low levels of exposure are unknown. Participants were asked whether they wanted to receive their results and their child's (...)
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  41.  19
    How Does the Mind Render Streaming Experience as Events?Dare A. Baldwin & Jessica E. Kosie - 2021 - Topics in Cognitive Science 13 (1):79-105.
    Events—the experiences we think we are having and recall having had—are constructed; they are not what actually occurs. What occurs is ongoing dynamic, multidimensional, sensory flow, which is somehow transformed via psychological processes into structured, describable, memorable units of experience. But what is the nature of the redescription processes that fluently render dynamic sensory streams as event representations? How do such processes cope with the ubiquitous novelty and variability that characterize sensory experience? How are event‐rendering skills acquired and how do (...)
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  42.  24
    Contratualismo e disposições morais: uma crítica à tese da inseparabilidade do direito e da moral e à tese sobre a existência de leis naturais.Marcelo de Araújo - 2009 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 54 (1):161-184.
    Discuto aqui duas diferentes interpretações acerca do que seria uma teoria do direito natural . A primeira interpretação se caracteriza pela tese da “inseparabilidade” do direito e da moral, ao passo que a segunda secaracteriza pela tese segundo a qual existiriam “leis naturais”, i.e. leis cuja existência independeria da existência de instituições humanas. Tentomostrar que as duas teses são falsas. Procuro mostrar inicialmente que a confusão entre as duas teses se deve a uma má compreensão da distinção entre frases do (...)
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  43.  3
    A Condição Humana E a Condição Docente: Das Ilusões de Onipotência Ao Reconhecimento Do Desamparo.Diogo Bogéa - 2021 - Educação E Filosofia 34 (71):679-704.
    A condição humana e a condição docente: das ilusões de onipotência ao reconhecimento do desamparo Resumo: Partindo do princípio de que todo processo educacional é aberta ou veladamente guiado por uma determinada maneira de se compreender o ser humano, procuramos nesse artigo colocar em questão os ideais de “humano”, e consequentemente, de humano-professor, que a tradição ocidental nos legou. Em seguida, tentamos indicar alguns caminhos para repensarmos contemporaneamente o que significa ser humano e, por conseguinte, o que significa ser professor. (...)
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  44.  58
    A Kantian Perspective on the Characteristics of Ethics Programs.Norman E. Bowie - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):275-292.
    The literature contains many recommendations, both explicit and implicit, that suggest how an ethics program ought to be designed.While we recognize the contributions of these works, we also note that these recommendations are typically based on either social scientific theory or data and as a result they tend to discount the moral aspects of ethics programs. To contrast and complement these approaches, we refer to a theory of the right to identify the characteristics of an effective ethics program. We (...)
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  45.  45
    A Model Sophist: Nietzsche on Protagoras and Thucydides.Joel E. Mann & Getty L. Lustila - 2011 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 42 (1):51-72.
    Abstract: While many commentators have remarked on Nietzsche’s admiration for the Greek historian Thucydides, most reduce the affinity between the two thinkers to their common commitments to “political realism” or “scientific naturalism.” At the same time, some of these same commentators have sought to minimize or dismiss Nietzsche’s enthusiasm for the Greek sophists. We do not deny the importance of realism or naturalism, but we suggest that, for Nietzsche, realism and naturalism are rooted in a rejection of moral absolutism (...)
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  46.  2
    Journeys, Not Destinations: Theorizing a Process View of Supply Chain Integrity.Matthew A. Douglas, Diane A. Mollenkopf, Vincent E. Castillo, John E. Bell & Emily C. Dickey - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-26.
    Integrity is considered an important corporate value. Yet recent global events have highlighted the challenges firms face at living up to their stated values, especially when extended supply chain partners are involved. The concept of Supply Chain Integrity can help firms shift focus beyond internal corporate integrity, toward supply chain integrity. Researchers and managers will benefit from an understanding of the SCI concept toward implementing SCI to better align supply chain partners with stated corporate values. This research fully develops and (...)
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  47. Humility in Seminary Student Formation: A Mixed Method Community Action Study.Dottie A. Oleson, Steven J. Sandage, James Tomlinson & Laura E. Captari - 2021 - Journal of Spiritual Formation and Soul Care 14 (2):211-234.
    This cross-sectional mixed method community action study exploring the virtue of humility was conducted as part of a collaborative practical theology project at a pluralistic, ecumenical Mainline Protestant seminary. Students in a spiritual formation graduate class completed quantitative measures of humility, spiritual well-being, differentiation of self, mentalization, and mindfulness, while open-ended qualitative data captured their perspectives about the role of humility in formation. Qualitative results revealed important nuances about emerging religious leaders’ views on humility, including experiencing this virtue as (...)
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  48.  16
    Preferences Regarding Return of Genomic Results to Relatives of Research Participants, Including After Participant Death: Empirical Results From a Cancer Biobank.Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf, Kari G. Chaffee, Marguerite E. Robinson, Deborah R. Gordon, Noralane M. Lindor & Barbara A. Koenig - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):464-475.
    Data are lacking with regard to participants' perspectives on return of genetic research results to relatives, including after the participant's death. This paper reports descriptive results from 3,630 survey respondents: 464 participants in a pancreatic cancer biobank, 1,439 family registry participants, and 1,727 healthy individuals. Our findings indicate that most participants would feel obligated to share their results with blood relatives while alive and would want results to be shared with relatives after their death.
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  49.  24
    On Desiring the Desirable: E. J. Bond.E. J. Bond - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (218):489-496.
    In a famous passage in her book, Intention , Professor G. E. M. Anscombe argues that we can only render intelligible the idea of someone wanting a thing if we know under what aspect the person sees the thing as desirable. The wanted thing must be characterized by the wanter as desirable in some respect. ‘[What] is required for our concept of “wanting”’, she says, ‘is that a man should see what he wants under the aspect of some good’ . (...)
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  50.  19
    Mentalization and Embodied Selfhood in Borderline Personality Disorder.E. S. Neustadter, A. Fotopoulou, S. K. Fineberg & M. Steinfeld - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (3-4):126-157.
    Aberrations of self-experience are considered a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). While prominent aetiological accounts of BPD, such as the mentalization-based approach, appeal to the developmental constitution of self in early infant–caregiver environments, they often rely on a conception of self that is not explicitly articulated. Moreover, self-experience in BPD is often theorized at the level of narrative identity, thus minimizing the role of embodied experience. In this article, we present the hypothesis that disordered self and interpersonal (...)
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