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  1.  15
    Aristophanes And The Demon Poverty.A. H. Sommerstein - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (02):314-.
    Aristophanes' last two surviving plays, Assemblywomen and Wealth, have long been regarded as something of an enigma. The changes in structure – the diminution in the role of the chorus, the disappearance of the parabasis, etc. –, as well as the shift of interest away from the immediacies of current politics towards broader social themes, can reasonably be interpreted as an early stage of the process that ultimately transformed Old Comedy into New, even if it is unlikely ever to be (...)
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  2.  8
    Eumenides.A. F. Garvie, Aeschylus & A. H. Sommerstein - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:219-220.
  3.  14
    Notes on Aristophanes' Knights.A. H. Sommerstein - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (01):46-.
    I do not think it is possible to show beyond reasonable doubt that the two slaves who open the play either must have been, or cannot have been, visually identifiable by portrait-masks or otherwise as Demosthenes and Nikias. I wish however to point out a piece of evidence that appears to have gone unnoticed.
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  4.  7
    Notes on Aristophes' Wasps.A. H. Sommerstein - 1977 - Classical Quarterly 27 (02):261-.
    An ambiguity in this passage apperas to have gone unnoticed. The ambiguity in line 27 is well known; and when Xanthias at once continues ‘But you tell me about yours’, many a listener might well not immediately realize that the noun to be supplied was from 25 rather than from 27, and might therefore momentarily suppose that Xanthias was saying ‘Tell me about your penis’; a supposition that would be temporarily confirmed when Sosias replied ‘It's a big one’. The reaction (...)
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  5.  8
    Thesmophoriazusae. [REVIEW]Nan V. Dunbar, Aristophanes & A. H. Sommerstein - 1996 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 116:196-197.
  6.  34
    A New Edition of Aristophanes Giuseppe Mastromarco: Commedie di Aristofane, I. (Classici Greci U.T.E.T., 8 (I).) Pp. 665; 6 Plates. Turin: Unione Tipografico–Editrice Torinese, 1983. L. 52,000. [REVIEW]A. H. Sommerstein - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (02):177-178.
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  7.  7
    Again Klytaimestra's Weapon.A. H. Sommerstein - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (02):296-.
    Malcolm Davies, CQ 37 , 65–75, has argued strongly for the view, almost universally discarded since Fraenkel's Agamemnon appeared, that Aeschylus envisaged Klytaimestra as killing her husband with an axe. He succeeds in establishing a strong probability that, among the various pre-Aeschylean versions of the story of Agamemnon's death, those which had him killed in his bath with the help of an entangling robe always made Klytaimestra use an axe, not a sword, to strike the fatal blows; and Sophocles and (...)
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  8.  15
    Lysistrata. The Acharnians. The Clouds. [REVIEW]Paul MacKendrick, Aristophanes & A. H. Sommerstein - 1974 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 94:185-186.
  9.  11
    A New Edition of Aristophanes.A. H. Sommerstein - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (02):177-.
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  10.  12
    Notes on the Text of Aristophanes' Peace.A. H. Sommerstein - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (02):353-.
    Cobet, in his second discussion of γορεύω and its compounds, maintained that these verbs in Attic formed all tenses except present and imperfect from ρ, επον, ερηκα, ερηµα, ρρήθην, save that forms with -αγορευ- were optionally used to distinguish certain alternative meanings. Thus πηγόρευσα etc. could be used in the sense ‘forbid’, but not in that of ‘weary’ or ‘give up’; προηγορευµένα could be used in the sense ‘proclaimed’, but not in that of ‘foretold’ ‘or’ ‘said previously’; προσαγορεσαι etc. could (...)
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  11.  5
    Review Article I: AristophanesCommedia E Partecipazione: La Pace di AristofaneAristophanes: Poet and DramatistAristophanes: LysistrataThe Mask of Comedy: Aristophanes and the Intertextual Parabasis. [REVIEW]A. M. Bowie, A. C. Cassio, R. M. Harriott, J. Henderson, T. K. Hubbard & A. H. Sommerstein - 1993 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 113:166-169.