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  1.  40
    A Theory of Justice: Revised Edition.A. J. Walsh - 2001 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):447.
    Book Information A Theory of Justice: Revised Edition. By John Rawls. Oxford University Press. Oxford. 1999. Pp. xxii + 538. Hardback, £25.00. Paperback, £12.99.
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  2.  67
    The Good Mercenary?Tony Lynch & A. J. Walsh - 2000 - Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (2):133–153.
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  3. Review of 'How Propaganda Works' by Jason Stanley: Princeton University Press , $56.95 Hb, 373 Pp, 9780691164427.A. J. Walsh - 2016 - Australian Book Review 380:52-53.
    Jason Stanley argues in his new book that propaganda is more prevalent within liberal democracies - and is of far greater concern - than is typically assumed. Indeed, Stanley suggests that the very idea that propaganda only proliferates within authoritarian regimes, which have ministries set aside for its production, is a central tenet of the propaganda of the West. Stanley's aim in this book is to outline the distinctive features of propaganda within a liberal democracy. On his account, the 'flawed (...)
     
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  4. Attitudes: Review 'Consciousness and Moral Responsibility' by Neil Levy. Oxford University Press, $117 Hb, 176 Pp, 978019870638. [REVIEW]A. J. Walsh - unknown
    Consider the following dilemma. If it is possible to identify the cause of a person's action and beliefs - causes that are outside the agent's own conscious reasoning - in what sense can we say that the person chooses what she does or she thinks? If the person did not consciously choose, then it is reasonable to ask whether she should be held morally responsible for any of the subsequent consequences of her actions. This is the general territory of the (...)
     
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  5. Review of 'Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea' by Mark Blyth: Oxford University Press, $29.95 Hb, 288 Pp, 9780199828302. [REVIEW]A. J. Walsh - unknown
    Mark Blyth's 'Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea' is at heart a morality tale, or, more accurately, an account of two competing and diametrically opposed morality tales jostling to explain both the recent Global Financial Crisis that engulfed much of Europe in 2008 and the austerity policies that were implemented by most governments in that region in its aftermath. According to proponents of austerity, economic growth can only be achieved through reductions in state spending. Blyth argues with great passion (...)
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  6. Noxious Markets, Inequality and Social Meanings: Review of 'Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets', by Debra Satz, New York: Oxford University Press, 2010, Xi + 252 Pp., US$35.00 , ISBN 978-0-19-531159-4. [REVIEW]A. J. Walsh - unknown
    Noxious markets, inequality and social meanings In this thoughtful and timely book, Debra Satz provides a convincing justificatory framework for our ongoing discomfort at the intrusion of markets into many areas of our lives that hitherto had been free from commercial influence. Her central problem is the commodification of everyday life. We inhabit social worlds which are highly commodified and in which the market is often prescribed as a universal panacea for any social problem we confront. Yet despite such overt (...)
     
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  7. Sport, Commerce and the Market.A. J. Walsh - unknown
    Over the past 50 years, we have witnessed a revolution in the organisation and social understanding of elite sport. Elite sport has been commercialised. Top-level athletes have become professionals who often receive remarkable levels of income and sporting events, such as the World Cup, are multi-billion dollar exercises that attract enormous levels of sponsorship. Many sports, such as cricket, have been substantially revamped in order to make them more appealing to mass audiences and, accordingly, more beneficial to sponsors and many (...)
     
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  8.  22
    Intuition, Theory and Anti‐Theory in Ethics Sophie Grace Chappell , 2015 Oxford, Oxford University Press Ix + 230 Pp, £40.00. [REVIEW]A. J. Walsh - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (4):467-469.
    Since the publication of Jonathan Dancy's 'Moral Reasons' in 1991, many English speaking ethicists have been especially interested in the role of abstract theory in moral life and the extent to which principles analogous to those employed in the hard sciences like physics are central to the development of ethical knowledge. Unlike earlier generations of philosophers who had, on the whole, accepted that principles had an integral role in the life of a morally serious person, contemporary ethicists are largely divided (...)
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  9. Review of 'Hard Times: The Divisive Toll of the Economic Slump' by Tom Clark and Anthony Heath: Yale University Press , $30 Hb, 310 Pp, 9780300203776. [REVIEW]A. J. Walsh - unknown
    It is now more than six years since the Global Financial Crisis threatened to topple the banking systems of the Western world. Although a complete breakdown in the financial system was ultimately avoided, one consequence of the events of 2008 has been the biggest slump in economic activity since the Great Depression. Australia was, in the main, spared the economic damage that ravaged large parts of Europe, and there has been little discussion in these parts of the causes and social (...)
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  10. Against Virtue Parsimony: Markets, Good Intentions, and Political Life.A. J. Walsh - unknown
    We inhabit a world in which the market is a dominant institutional form of social organization. This influence is not without its critics, and there is considerable debate amongst political philosophers and policy-makers about whether the range of the market should expand or contract and, further, about the extent to which the market should be subject to constraints and government regulation. The expansion of the market into realms hitherto unknown is the theme of a number of recent books, including Michael (...)
     
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  11. Review of Nine, Cara, 'Global Justice and Territory', Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, Pp. X + 192, £54.00. [REVIEW]A. J. Walsh - unknown
    Does the pursuit of ideals of global justice mean we must relinquish exclusive territorial rights and, in particular, exclusive resource rights? Cosmopolitans have assumed that it does. In this rich and thoughtful book, Cara Nine runs against the tide of much thinking on global justice and pursues the provocative suggestion that if we take territorial rights to be fundamental elements in a theory of global justice, then there will be circumstances where resource inequality can be justified. Nine does not so (...)
     
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  12. Review of 'Worldly Philosopher: The Odyssey of Albert O. Hirschman' by Jeremy Adelman, Princeton University Press , $74 Hb, 754 Pp, 9780691155678, And: 'The Essential Hirschman' Edited by Jeremy Adelman, Princeton University Press , $47.95 Hb, 401 Pp, 9780691159904.A. J. Walsh - 2014 - Australian Book Review 364:29-30.
    Albert O. Hirschman was a development economist and political theorist whose work is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding how economic life figures in the political worlds we inhabit and the ways in which we give meaning to our lives in market-based societies. Perhaps best known for the distinction between 'exit' and 'voice', Hirschman was a prolific theorist who wrote about the role individual moral virtue and individual self-interest should play in economic activity, how economic growth in the developing (...)
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  13. The Mandevillean Conceit and the Profit-Motive.A. J. Walsh & A. J. Lynch - unknown
    Invisible Hand accounts of the operations of the competitive market are often thought to have two implications for morality as it confronts economic life. First, explanations of agents economic activities eschew constitutive appeal to moral notions; and second, such moralism is pernicious insofar as it tends to undermine the operations of a socially valuable social process. This is the Mandevillean Conceit. The Conceit rests on an avarice-only reading of the profit-motive that is mistaken. The avarice-only reading is not the only (...)
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  14.  17
    Consumer Sovereignty, Rationality and the Mandatory Labelling of Genetically Modified Food.J. A. Burgess & A. J. Walsh - 1999 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 18 (3):7-26.