92 found
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  1. The Philosophy of Language.A. P. Martinich - 1987 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 49 (2):353-353.
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  2. Hobbes. [REVIEW]A. P. Martinich - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 64 (3):636-637.
  3. The Philosophy of Language.A. P. Martinich & David Sosa - 2012 - Oxford University Press USA.
    What is meaning? How is linguistic communication possible? What is the nature of language? What is the relationship between language and the world? How do metaphors work? The Philosophy of Language, Sixth Edition, is an excellent introduction to such fundamental questions. Incorporating insights from new coeditor David Sosa, the sixth edition collects forty-eight of the most important articles in the field, making it the most up-to-date and comprehensive volume on the subject. Revised to address changing trends and contemporary developments, the (...)
     
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  4.  12
    Surfaces.A. P. Martinich - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (2):476-478.
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  5.  60
    The Sovereign in the Political Thought of Hanfeizi and Thomas Hobbes.A. P. Martinich - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):64-72.
  6. Philosophy of Language.A. P. Martinich (ed.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    What do ‘meaning’ and ‘truth’ mean? And how are they situated in the concrete practices of linguistic communication? What is the relationship between words and the world? How—with words—can people do such varied things as marry, inaugurate a president, and declare a country’s independence? How is language able to express knowledge, belief, and other mental states? What are metaphors and how do they work? Is a mathematically rigorous account of language possible? Does language make women invisible and encode a male (...)
     
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  7.  43
    Conversational Maxims and Some Philosophical Problems.A. P. Martinich - 1980 - Philosophical Quarterly 30 (120):215-228.
  8. Hobbes a Biography.A. P. Martinich - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes is recognized as one of the fathers of modern philosophy and political theory. In his own time he was as famous for his work in physics, geometry, and religion. He associated with some of the greatest writers, scientists, and politicians of his age. Martinich has written a complete and accessible biography of Hobbes. The book takes full account of the historical and cultural context in which Hobbes lived, drawing on both published and unpublished sources. It will be a (...)
     
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  9. Hobbes: A Biography.A. P. Martinich - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes is recognized as one of the fathers of modern philosophy and political theory. In his own time he was as famous for his work in physics, geometry, and religion. He associated with some of the greatest writers, scientists, and politicians of his age. Martinich has written a complete and accessible biography of Hobbes. The book takes full account of the historical and cultural context in which Hobbes lived, drawing on both published and unpublished sources. It will be a (...)
     
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  10.  63
    Egoism, Reason, and the Social Contract.A. P. Martinich - 2012 - Hobbes Studies 25 (2):209-222.
    Bernard Gert’s distinctive interpretation of the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes in his recent book may be questioned in at least three areas: (1) Even if Hobbes is not a psychological egoist, he seems to be a desire egoist, which has the consequence, as he understands it, that a person acts at least for his own good in every action. (2) Although there are several senses of reason, it seems that Hobbes uses the idea that reason is calculation of means to (...)
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  11.  16
    Hobbes.A. P. Martinich - 2005 - Routledge.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) was the first great English philosopher and one of the most important theorists of human nature and politics in the history of Western thought.
  12.  43
    The Attributive Use of Proper Names.A. P. Martinich - 1977 - Analysis 37 (4):159 - 163.
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  13.  41
    A Pragmatic Solution to the Liar Paradox.A. P. Martinich - 1983 - Philosophical Studies 43 (1):63 - 67.
  14.  4
    On Thomas Hobbes’s English Calvinism: Necessity, Omnipotence, and Goodness.A. P. Martinich - 2012 - Philosophical Readings 4 (1):18-30.
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  15.  7
    Thomas Hobbes.Brian Richardson & A. P. Martinich - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (4):671.
  16.  46
    Taming the Leviathan: The Reception of the Political and Religious Ideas of Thomas Hobbes in England 1640–1700. [REVIEW]A. P. Martinich - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):142-143.
    Parkin’s book covers the same period and much of the same material as John Bowle’s Hobbes and his Critics and Samuel Mintz’s The Hunting of Leviathan, but his scholarship is more extensive and significantly better than that of the earlier books. The scholarship is similar to that of Jeffrey Collins in Hobbes’s Allegiance and belongs to the same school of Cambridge contextualism. Parkin’s book contains good summaries of the books and pamphlets that were published about Hobbes’ political and religious philosophy (...)
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  17.  12
    Philosophy and the History of Philosophy.A. P. Martinich - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3).
    Two recent articles described two ways of writing the history of philosophy, one analytic, the other historical, as if the history of philosophy cannot be both analytically sharp and contextually informed at the same time. I recommend the practice of "philosophical history of philosophy," which combines the advantages of the analytic and historical methods.
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  18. The Interpretation of Covenants in Leviathan.A. P. Martinich - 2004 - In Tom Sorell & Luc Foisneau (eds.), Leviathan After 350 Years. Oxford University Press.
  19.  25
    God, Emperor and Relative Identity.A. P. Martinich - 1979 - Franciscan Studies 39 (1):180-191.
    This article defends my claim, first presented in "identity and trinity," "journal of religion" (1978), that the doctrine of the trinity is consistent. drawing upon tertullian's defense of the doctrine in "adversus praxean", i argue that the logic of the trinity is similar to the logic of emperorship. at various times, two persons, for example, diocletian and maximian, were the same emperor of the roman empire, just as three persons are the same god.
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  20. The attributive use of proper names.A. P. Martinich - 1977 - Analysis 37 (4):159.
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  21. Hobbes.A. P. Martinich - 2005 - Routledge.
    Thomas Hobbes was the first great English philosopher and one of the most important theorists of human nature and politics in the history of Western thought. This superlative introduction presents Hobbes' main doctrines and arguments, covering all of Hobbes' philosophy. A.P. Martinich begins with a helpful overview of Hobbes' life and work, setting his ideas against the political and scientific background of seventeenth-century England. He then introduces and assesses, in clear chapters, Hobbes' contributions to fundamental areas of philosophy: epistemology and (...)
     
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  22.  6
    Interpreting the Religion of Thomas Hobbes: An Exchange: Hobbes’s Erastianism and Interpretation.A. P. Martinich - 2009 - Journal of the History of Ideas 70 (1):143-163.
  23.  10
    Obligation, Ability Andprima Facie Promising.A. P. Martinich - 1987 - Philosophia 17 (3):323-330.
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  24.  33
    A Solution to a Paradox of Promising.A. P. Martinich - 1985 - Philosophia 15 (1-2):117-122.
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  25. Leviathan.A. P. Martinich (ed.) - 2002 - Broadview Press.
    Hobbes' classic work has set the tone for the course of political philosophy through to our own day. This new Broadview edition includes the full text of the 1651 edition, together with a wide variety of background documents that help set the work in context. Also included are an introduction, explanatory notes, and a chronology.
     
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  26. A Companion to Analytic Philosophy.A. P. Martinich & E. David Sosa (eds.) - 2001 - Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  27.  11
    A Companion to Analytic Philosophy.A. P. Martinich & E. David Sosa (eds.) - 2001 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  28.  30
    Mozi’s Ideal Political Philosophy.A. P. Martinich & Siwing Tsoi - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (3):253-274.
    The main purpose of this article is to show that the essence of Mozi’s political theory, namely that a civil state is in its best or ideal condition when each citizen exercises universal care, is more defensible than it is usually thought to be. Doing this will require an exposition of the main features of his theory and occasionally reference arguments and considerations outside of Mozi’s text. We interpret the disagreement between Mozi and his alleged Confucian opponents as a disagreement (...)
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  29.  22
    Religion, Fanaticism, and Liberalism.A. P. Martinich - 2000 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):409–425.
  30. Philosophical Writing: An Introduction.A. P. Martinich - 1996 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Substantially updated and revised, the third edition of _Philosophical Writing_ is designed to help those with little or no experience in philosophy to think and write successfully. Traces the evolution of a good philosophical essay from draft stage to completion Now includes new examples of the structures of a philosophical essay, new examples of rough drafts, tips on how to study for a test and a new section on how to utilize the internet effectively Written with clarity and wit by (...)
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  31.  2
    Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Thomas Hobbes by Timothy Raylor.A. P. Martinich - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (4):754-755.
    Timothy Raylor's book constitutes a major advance in understanding Thomas Hobbes's thought in several dimensions: of course, in philosophy and rhetoric, as his title indicates, but also in Hobbes's views of history, science, and civic humanism. Raylor's scholarship is of the highest order; and his judgment about texts, Hobbes's and others', is acute. His book should be as important to historians of philosophy as to rhetoricians and intellectual historians. Placing "Philosophy" and "Rhetoric" before Hobbes's name in the title is appropriate (...)
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  32.  30
    A estrutura de um ensaio filosófico.A. P. Martinich - 2003 - Critica.
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  33.  39
    Thomas Hobbes and the Natural Law Tradition.A. P. Martinich - 1995 - International Studies in Philosophy 27 (4):107-108.
  34.  22
    Infallibility: A. P. MARTINICH.A. P. Martinich - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (1):15-27.
    It has often been charged that the doctrine of papal infallibility is either false or incoherent. These charges stem, I believe, from a misunderstanding of the logical character of infallible papal utterances, a misunderstanding shared alike by friends and foes of the doctrine. In this paper, I shall argue that the doctrine is both coherent and correct. I devote section I to uncovering some of the sources of this misunderstanding and thereby defending what might be called my negative thesis, namely, (...)
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  35.  43
    Morality in the Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes: Cases in the Law of Nature (Review).A. P. Martinich - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (1):125-126.
    Sharon Lloyd's new book on Hobbes is one of the most significant in the last twenty-five years. She presents an original thesis about the foundation of Hobbes's moral philosophy, namely, that his basic moral principle is what she calls the "reciprocity theorem": "From our common definition of man as rational, Hobbes argues that we won't count a person as rational unless he can formulate and is willing to offer, at least post hoc, what he regards as justifying reasons for his (...)
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  36.  15
    Discussion – Infallibility*: A. P. MARTINICH.A. P. Martinich - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (1):81-86.
    Patrick McGrath has argued that my defence of papal infallibility does not succeed. His basic strategy is to establish that, contrary to my arguments, infallible papal utterances are statements and not merely declarations. He wants this result in order to go on to show that the Pope, in possession of no priviliged epistemic access to the world, is not infallible. I agree that the Pope has no priviliged epistemic access; so that is not in dispute. What is in dispute is (...)
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  37.  4
    Epicureism and Calvinism in Hobbes’s Philosophy: Consequences of Interpretation.A. P. Martinich - 2012 - Philosophical Readings 4 (3):3-15.
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  38.  27
    Meaning and Intention: Black Versus Grice.A. P. Martinich - 1990 - Dialectica 44 (1‐2):79-98.
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  39.  31
    The Achilles of Rationalist Arguments.A. P. Martinich - 1976 - International Studies in Philosophy 8:236-238.
  40.  27
    Toward a New Sensibility.A. P. Martinich - 1987 - International Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):66-67.
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  41.  27
    Morality and Sovereignty in the Philosophy of Hobbes.A. P. Martinich - 1995 - International Studies in Philosophy 27 (2):136-137.
  42.  26
    Philosophy in Question.A. P. Martinich - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):116-117.
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  43.  1
    Leviathan: Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, 2 Vols, G. A. J. Rogers and Karl Schuhmann (Eds), Bristol: Thoemmes Continuum, 2003. [REVIEW]A. P. Martinich - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):349-359.
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  44.  17
    Hobbes's Reply to Republicanism.A. P. Martinich - 2004 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 1.
    A. P. Martinich aims at explaining Hobbes’s criticism of Republicanism. Trying to adopt a middle position between subjection and liberty, Hobbes develops a theory of natural liberty which is compatible with both fear and necessity and civil liberty. He thus defines civil liberty as the extent to which a subject is free from laws and obligations, the degree of freedom not being determined by the kind of government a citizen is obliged to. As far as the liberty of states is (...)
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  45.  30
    Referring.A. P. Martinich - 1979 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (2):157-172.
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  46.  9
    The Distribution of Terms.Berndard D. Katz & A. P. Martinich - 1976 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 17 (2):279-283.
  47.  14
    Interpretation and Hobbes's Political Philosophy.A. P. Martinich - 2001 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 82 (3-4):309-331.
  48.  29
    Historia ecclesiastica (review).A. P. Martinich - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 470-471.
    This book in effect consists of two parts. The first part contains seven chapters on Historia Ecclesiastica Carmine and related topics, written by Patricia Springborg over many years. While valuable, they will not be discussed here because these have been previously published. The second part is a critical text and translation, on facing pages, of Historia Ecclesiastica by Springborg, Patricia Stablein, and Paul Wilson, accompanied by extensive explanatory and interpretive notes by the same scholars. The work shows prodigious effort and (...)
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  49.  11
    Scotus and Anselm on the Existence of God.A. P. Martinich - 1977 - Franciscan Studies 37 (1):139-152.
  50.  19
    Duns Scotus on the Possibility of an Infinite Being.A. P. Martinich - 1982 - Philosophical Topics 13 (Supplement):23-29.
    THE MAJOR PREMISE OF DUNS SCOTUS'S IMPRESSIVE PROOF FOR THE EXISTENCE OF GOD HAS BEEN NEGLECTED. THAT PREMISE, "THE MOST PERFECT BEING IS INFINITE," IS ESTABLISHED IN TWO WAYS. THE KEY PREMISE IN EACH WAY IS THE PROPOSITION, "POSSIBLY, SOME BEING IS INFINITE." THIS PROPOSITION CANNOT BE PROVEN TO BE TRUE, NOT BECAUSE IT IS IN ANY WAY DUBIOUS OR LACKING IN EVIDENCE, BUT BECAUSE ITS TERMS ARE SIMPLE AND NOT SUBJECT TO PROOF OR FURTHER ANALYSIS. BEING IS THE SIMPLEST (...)
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