Results for 'A. R. E.'

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  1.  4
    Insights From the Supplementary Motor Area Syndrome in Balancing Movement Initiation and Inhibition.A. R. E. Potgieser, B. M. de Jong, M. Wagemakers, E. W. Hoving & R. J. M. Groen - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  2.  80
    Moore's Defence of Common Sense: A Reappraisal After Fifty Years: R. E. Tully.R. E. Tully - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (197):289-306.
    G. E. Moore'sA Defence of Common Sensehas generated the kind of interest and contrariety which often accompany what is new, provocative, and even important (...)in philosophy. Moore himself reportedly agreed with Wittgenstein's estimate that this was his best article, while C. D. Broad has lamented its very great but largely unfortunate influence. Although the essay inspired Wittgenstein to explore the basis of Moore's claim to know many propositions of common sense to be true, A. J. Ayer judges its enduring value to lie in provoking a more sophisticated conception of the very type of metaphysics which disputes any such unqualified claim of certainty. (shrink)
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  3.  27
    Autonomy, Religion and Clinical Decisions: Findings From a National Physician Survey.R. E. Lawrence & F. A. Curlin - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):214-218.
    Background: Patient autonomy has been promoted as the most important principle to guide difficult clinical decisions. To examine whether practising physicians indeed value patient autonomy above other (...)
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  4.  28
    The Rise of Empirical Research in Medical Ethics: A MacIntyrean Critique and Proposal.R. E. Lawrence & F. A. Curlin - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (2):206-216.
    Hume's is/ought distinction has long limited the role of empirical research in ethics, saying that data about what something is cannot yield conclusions about the way (...) things ought to be. However, interest in empirical research in ethics has been growing despite this countervailing principle. We attribute some of this increased interest to a conceptual breakdown of the is/ought distinction. MacIntyre, in reviewing the history of the is/ought distinction, argues that is and ought are not strictly separate realms but exist in a close relationship that is clarified by adopting a teleological orientation. We propose that, instead of recovering a teleological orientation, society tends to generate its own goals via democratic methods like those described by Rousseau or adopt agnosticism about teleology such as described by Richard Rorty. In both latter scenarios, the distinction between is and ought is obscured, and the role for empirical research grows, but for controversial reasons. MacIntyre warns that the is/ought distinction should remain, but reminds ethicists to make careful arguments about when and why it is legitimate to move from is to ought. (shrink)
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  5.  3
    The Granite Area of the Schapenberg, Somerset West.A. R. E. Walker - 1917 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 6 (3):193-202.
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  6.  15
    A.R.E Webber: Between Ariel and Caliban.Paget Henry - 2010 - Clr James Journal 16 (1):243-250.
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  7. Protecting the Vulnerable: A Reanalysis of Our Social Responsibilities.R. E. GOODIN - 1985
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  8. Frontal Lobes and the Regulation of Arousal Processes.A. R. Luria & E. D. Homskaya - 1970 - In D. Mostofsky (ed.), Attention: Contemporary Theory and Analysis. Appleton-Century-Crofts. pp. 303--330.
     
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  9.  11
    Latent Inhibition and Schizophrenia.R. E. Lubow, I. Weiner, A. Schlossberg & I. Baruch - 1987 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (6):464-467.
  10. Toward the Development of a Multidimensional Scale for Improving Evaluations of Business Ethics.R. E. Reidenbach & D. P. Robin - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (8):639 - 653.
    This study represents an improvement in the ethics scales inventory published in a 1988 Journal of Business Ethics article. The article presents the distillation and validation process (...)
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  11.  48
    R. E. Bell: Place-Names in Classical Mythology: Greece. Pp. Xiii + 350. Santa Barbara, Cal. and Oxford: ABC-Clio, 1989. £34.75[REVIEW]A. R. Burn - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):529-530.
  12.  10
    A Double-Layer Mechanism for the Complex-Ion Embrittlement of Silver Chloride.A. R. C. Westwood, D. L. Goldheim & E. N. Pugh - 1967 - Philosophical Magazine 15 (133):105-120.
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  13. A Critical Theory of Education: Habermas and Our Children's Future.R. E. Young - 1990 - Teachers College Press.
  14.  12
    The Phenomenon of Life: Toward a Philosophical Biology[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (1):154-154.
    Eleven previously published essays presenting a moderately unified argument in favor of the general conception of what Jonas calls the "Philosophy of Life," as well as detailed (...)
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  15.  45
    Exploring Employee Engagement with Social Responsibility: A Social Exchange Perspective on Organisational Participation.R. E. Slack, S. Corlett & R. Morris - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):537-548.
    Corporate social responsibility is a recognised and common part of business activity. Some of the regularly cited motives behind CSR are employee morale, recruitment and retention, with (...)
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  16.  93
    Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. I. The Warren Papyri. Ed. by M. David, B. A. van Groningen, and J. C. van Oven. Pp. xii + 76, 7 pll. 1941. Gld. 15. E. J. Brill, Leyden.II. Einige Wiener Papyri. Ed. by E. Boswinkel. Pp. viii + 76, 6 pll. 1942. Gld. 15. E. J. Brill, Leyden. III. Some Oxford Papyri. Ed. by E.P. Wegener. A. Text, pp. xxi + 96. 1942. B. Plates . 1948. Gld. 25. E. J. Brill, Leyden. IV. De Herodoti reliquiis in papyris et membranie Aegyptiis servatis. Ed. by A. H. R. E. Paap. Pp. viii + 104. 1948. Gld. 17.50. E. J. Brill, Leyden. V. Recherches sur le Recensement dans l'Égypte romaine . Ed. by M. Humbert and Cl. Préaux. Pp. x + 186, 1 pl. 1952. Gld. 50. E. J. Brill, Leyden.VI. A Family-Archive from Tebtunis. Ed. by B. A. van Groningen. 1950. Pp. xvi + 190. Gld. 40. E. J. Brill, Leyden[REVIEW]E. G. Turner, M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven, E. Boswinkel, E. P. Wegener, A. H. R. E. Paap, M. Hombert & Cl Preaux - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:163-164.
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  17.  52
    Completely Mitotic R.E. Degrees.R. G. Downey & T. A. Slaman - 1989 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 41 (2):119-152.
  18. Free Will as Involving Determination and Inconceivable Without It.R. E. Hobart - 1934 - Mind 43 (169):1-27.
    The thesis of this article is that there has never been any ground for the controversy between the doctrine of free will and determinism, that it is (...)
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  19.  7
    The Embodied Mind[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):603-603.
    Embodiment, Vesey maintains, is the term applied to our experience of an unmediated movement of our body and an unmediated awareness within perceptual experience. Vesey argues for (...)
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  20.  31
    The Logical Structure of the World and Pseudoproblems in Philosophy.E. A. R. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (1):153-153.
    This is a translation of Carnap's early classic, Der Logische Aufbau der Welt and his less technical but also important article from the same period, Scheinprobleme (...)in der Philosophie. It is no secret that Carnap abandoned the phenomenalism of the Aufbau for the physicalism of Logische Syntax der Sprache, but there is no doubt that the real message of the Aufbauwhich is punctuated with the Messianic spirit of early logical positivismis the program of "rational reconstruction" which becomes, on an inverted reading and with the addition of a bias in favor of the universal descriptive and explanatory power of scientific discourse, the program of scientific reductionism. In this light, the continuities between the Aufbau and Carnap's later work completely dwarf in importance the discrepancies between these two periods of his creative output. The Aufbau remains an important book in its own right, and is not simply a detailed manifesto of a now defunct program; it is a pleasure to have it in English.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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  21.  16
    Locke and Berkeley: A Collection of Critical Essays[REVIEW]E. A. R. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):160-160.
    Volume VI in Doubleday's Modern Studies in Philosophy series. Martin is responsible for the ten Locke essays, Armstrong for the twelve on Berkeley. The essays on (...)Locke are by Ryle, Yolton, Jackson, Barnes, Bennett, Flew, Monson, Macpherson, and Ryan. The last three cover Locke's political philosophy while the others inevitably concern themselves with Locke's psychology and epistemology. The Berkeley essays are by Broad, Luce, Grave, Marc-Wogau, Cummins, Mabbott, Bennett, Furlong, Beardsley, Thomson, and Popper. Popper's essay is on "Berkeley as Precursor of Mach and Einstein." As with Locke, the other topics are predictable, though a total of three essays are devoted to the role of "God" in Berkeley's philosophy. An index and a short bibliography are appended.--E. A. R. (shrink)
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  22.  18
    Diffusion Kinetics in Dilute Binary Alloys with the H.C.P. Crystal Structure.A. R. Allnatt, I. V. Belova & G. E. Murch - 2014 - Philosophical Magazine 94 (22):2487-2504.
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  23.  16
    The Problem of Embodiment: Some Contributions to a Phenomenology of the Body[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):604-605.
    Zaner's "contributions" are expository, critical, and original, in that order of extension. The major part of the text is taken up with an exposition and criticism (...)of the theories of embodiment of Marcel, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty, with a strong emphasis on the unacknowledged borrowings of the latter two from Marcel-and, to a less obvious, but equally as important extent, of all three from Bergson. "Embodiment" is taken as a technical term referring to the on-going process by which consciousness relates itself to the world in and through its body. Zaner is sharply critical of what he regards as the ontological bias of each of the three men whose theory of embodiment he examines; for while he is willing to admit the central importance of this problem to philosophy as a whole, he regards an ontological handling of it as a subversion of the ontological neutrality of the phenomenological methods developed by Husserl. The original section of the book outlines a program for a "descriptive-explicative analysis" of the phenomenon of embodiment along basically Husserlian lines, and is extremely suggestive, though highly condensed. An extensive appendix includes the original texts of the major passages cited throughout the book.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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  24.  4
    A Study of Copper Distribution in Lamellar AlCuAl2eutectics Using an Energy Analysing Electron Microscope.D. R. Spalding, R. E. Villacrana & G. A. Chadwick - 1969 - Philosophical Magazine 20 (165):471-488.
  25.  9
    Action and Purpose.E. A. R. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (1):161-162.
    In a detailed and careful manner, Taylor sets about an analysis of the notions of causation, human action, purpose, and a whole host of other conceptions such (...)
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  26.  4
    Greek Architecture.R. E. Wycherley & A. W. Lawrence - 1959 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 79:199-200.
  27.  5
    Phase Transformation of Mixed Cr1xAlxN Nitride Precipitates in Ferrite.A. R. Clauss, E. Bischoff, R. E. Schacherl & E. J. Mittemeijer - 2009 - Philosophical Magazine 89 (6):565-582.
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  28.  9
    Adsorption, Embrittlement and Stress-Corrosion Cracking.A. R. C. Westwood, E. N. Pugh & D. L. Goldheim - 1964 - Philosophical Magazine 10 (104):345-347.
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  29.  26
    Studies in Plato's Metaphysics[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):611-611.
    Twenty essays by fifteen British and American writers representing some of the best anglo-american Platonic scholarship dating, chiefly, from the fifties but with essays by Cherniss, (...)Ryle, Vlastos, and Hackforth dating from the thirties. The later dialogues are the focus with nine of the essays treating the Theory of Forms explicitly. Included are essays by Ryle and Runciman on the Parmenides, and also the Vlastos-Geach exchange on the Third Man Argument. The Timaeus is covered by Cherniss' "On the Relation of the Timaeus to Plato's Later Dialogues," and also by Vlastos' "The Disorderly Motion in the Timaeus" and Morrow's "Necessity and Persuasion in Plato's Timaeus." In all, a welcome collection.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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  30.  13
    Note Onspodumenefrom Namaqualand.G. O. Scully & A. R. E. Walker - 1914 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 4 (1):65-67.
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  31.  10
    The Benthos of Some Southern African Lakes Part I: Distribution of Aquatic Macrophytes and Fish in Lake Sibayi.R. E. Boltt, B. J. Hill & A. T. Forbes - 1969 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 38 (3):241-248.
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  32.  15
    The Annealing of Vacancies in Dilute Alloys.R. E. Howard & A. B. Lidiard - 1965 - Philosophical Magazine 11 (114):1179-1187.
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  33.  57
    A Late and Shifting Foundation: a Commentary on Djulbegovic, B., Guyatt, G. H. & Ashcroft, R. E. (2009) Cancer Control, 16, 158168[REVIEW]Mark R. Tonelli - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):907-909.
  34.  34
    On a New Idiom in the Study of Entailment.R. E. Jennings, Y. Chen & J. Sahasrabudhe - 2011 - Logica Universalis 5 (1):101-113.
    This paper is an experiment in Leibnizian analysis. The reader will recall that Leibniz considered all true sentences to be analytically so. The difference, on his account, (...)
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  35.  13
    Inventing the Barbarian: Greek Self-Definition Through Tragedy[REVIEW]R. G. A. Buxton & E. Hall - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:217-218.
  36.  37
    The Population History of England, 1541-1871. A Reconstruction.Katherine A. Lynch, E. A. Wrigley, R. S. Schofield, Ronald Lee & Jim Oeppen - 1983 - History and Theory 22 (1):93.
  37.  10
    Summa Theologiae, Vol. LX[REVIEW]E. A. R. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):534-535.
    Like its predecessors in this new sixty volume edition of the Summa, this book has been meticulously prepared. A working text has been taken from the Parma (...)
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  38.  43
    Bounding Non- GLand R.E.A.Klaus Ambos-Spies, Decheng Ding, Wei Wang & Liang Yu - 2009 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 74 (3):989-1000.
    We prove that every Turing degree a bounding some non-GLdegree is recursively enumerable in and above (r.e.a.) some 1-generic degree.
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  39.  15
    Translational Ethics: an Analytical Framework of Translational Movements Between Theory and Practice and a Sketch of a Comprehensive Approach.Kristine Bærøe - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):71.
    Translational research in medicine requires researchers to identify the steps to transfer basic scientific discoveries from laboratory benches to bedside decision-making, and eventually into clinical practice. (...)On a parallel track, philosophical work in ethics has not been obliged to identify the steps to translate theoretical conclusions into adequate practice. The medical ethicist A. Cribb suggested some years ago that it is now time to debatethe business of translationalin medical ethics. Despite the very interesting and useful perspective on the field of medical ethics launched by Cribb, the debate is still missing. In this paper, I take up Cribbs invitation and discuss further analytic distinctions needed to base an ethics aiming to translate between theory and practice. (shrink)
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  40.  62
    Ghazali and Aquinas on Causation.R. E. A. Shanab - 1974 - The Monist 58 (1):140-150.
    The Islamic Medieval Philosopher al-Ghazᾱlî, known to the Latins as Algazel, was influential in the shaping of the intellectual philosophic movements in the thirteenth century. Though (...)Ghazalis predecessor Ibn Sînᾱ and successor Ibn Rushd received the philosophic credit due to them, Ghazalis own philosophic ideas have not been significantly assessed; and hence Ghazalisfamelies, we are told, in being responsible for the decline of Medieval Philosophy, especially Islamic Philosophy, a claim that is extremely difficult to prove. But be that as it may, the intellectual movement in Europe during the thirteenth century pursued the intellectual Islamic heritage, not just of Avicenna and Averroës, but also that of Ghazali. Granted that Ghazalis philosophic ideas did not assume a definite pattern in the philosophic literatureas was the case with Avicenna and Averroësstill a careful study of Ghazalis works will reveal how profound and widespread his influence was on Western Medieval scholars. A case in point is the influence of Ghazali on Saint Thomas Aquinaswho studied the works of the Islamic philosophers, especially Ghazalis, at The University of Naples. Thus in the course of the subsequent analysis, similarities between Ghazali and Aquinas will reveal themselves. The aim of this paper, however, does not consist in delineating their refutations of the arguments of the philosophers that one finds in Ghazalis and Aquinass works. Rather I shall primarily deal with their discussion of the principle of causality and then indicate how the works of Ghazali have played an important role in the shaping of the philosophic ideas of Aquinas. (shrink)
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  41.  28
    Studies in Phenomenology and Psychology[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):551-551.
    Eighteen of Gurwitsch's papers, all previously published between 1929 and 1961; nine of the papers appear in English for the first time. With the exception of (...)the mainly expository "The Last Work of Edmund Husserl," in which Gurwitsch limns the structure of Husserl's Krisis, all of the papers are serious forays into "constitutive" as distinguished from "existential" phenomenology. At times Gurwitsch goes about his business historically, engaging Descartes, Kant, a good deal of Hume, James, and, of course, Husserl in dialogue. In almost half of the papers Gestalt psychology, the psychological and biological work of Gelb and Goldstein, and the distinctively psychological work of James are the focus. The dominant theme of all the studies is consciousness and an exploration of the logical rather than existential problematic of intentionality. Gurwitsch wishes his work to be assessed as part of the Husserlian program of radically founding in the constituting consciousness all the systematized noematic fruits, i.e., sciences, of this same consciousness.. He is, however, a self-confessed heretic from the strict Husserlian point of view, having abandoned the doctrines of hyletic data, and, more interestingly, the egological root of consciousness.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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  42. R. E. Aquila, Representational Mind: A Study of Kant's Theory of Knowledge.R. Meerbote - 1985 - Kant-Studien 76 (4):464.
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  43.  26
    Everyday Life in Ancient Greece.R. G. A. & C. E. Robinson - 1934 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 54:222.
  44.  19
    The Brain and the Unity of Conscious Experience[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (2):366-366.
    In the Arthur Stanley Eddington Memorial Lecture for 1965 Eccles uses his considerable knowledge to argue that neurophysiology can give clues to the physical requirements of the (...)
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  45.  63
    The Genealogy of Disjunction.R. E. Jennings - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a comprehensive study of the English word 'or', and the logical operators variously proposed to present its meaning. Although there are indisputably disjunctive uses of (...)
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  46.  13
    Selected Papers[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1968 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):560-560.
    This volume makes available most of the major papers of the "man who may well have been America's outstanding teaching metaphysician during the second quarter of (...)this century." Phelan did indeed have a long list of impressive students to his credit, most of them coming out of the University of Toronto and the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies in Toronto. Included are Phelan's Aquinas Lecture of 1941, "St. Thomas and Analogy," "Being, Order and Knowledge," "The Concept of Beauty in St. Thomas Aquinas," "Justice and Friendship," "Verum Sequitur Esse Rerum," and eight others. The editor has added a bibliography of everything Phelan ever wrote, from books to book reviews to obituaries. Phelan's interests were clearly metaphysical; but his metaphysics was historical and interpretive, not creative.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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  47.  14
    A Nonlow2 R. E. Degree with the Extension of Embeddings Properties of a Low2 Degree.Y. Yang & R. A. Shore - 2002 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 48 (1):131-146.
    We construct a nonlow2 r.e. degree d such that every positive extension of embeddings property that holds below every low2 degree holds below d. Indeed, we (...)can also guarantee the converse so that there is a low r.e. degree c such that that the extension of embeddings properties true below c are exactly the ones true belowd.Moreover, we can also guarantee that no bd is the base of a nonsplitting pair. (shrink)
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  48.  12
    Plato's Progress[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (2):376-377.
    In terms of the details of Plato's life, the composition and order of the Dialogues and Epistles, and the political and scholastic climate of Plato's Athens (...) and the broader Hellenic culture, this is a daringly imaginative book; critics may find it too imaginative. Ryle argues against the authenticity of all the Epistles, basing his conclusion on a bit of close detective work involving the date of Dionysius I's death and the date of Plato's invitation to Syracuse: Epistle VII is all a bit of baseless Dionist propaganda. Ryle's conjecture that the majority of the Dialogues were designed for public dramatization and open competition, on the model of the Greek tragedies, at local and Olympic games is a distinct possibility. But will we be convinced by the many "straws" that support the hypothesis that the Apology-Crito-Phaedo sequence of Dialogues was written by Plato, not to justify Socrates, but to defend himself against a contemporary charge of defamation? that the Academy was founded in 371, not 387? that the Phaedrus was composed in 361-360, after the Laws? that the Republic was never published in Plato's lifetime? While Ryle vigorously supports all these contentions, inconsistencies or more plausible hypothesis remain. The book is unfortunately completely silent about any of the substantive issues in Plato's philosophy; but perhaps enough has been gained if Plato scholars are sent scurrying back to the ancillary Greek philosophies and histories, not to mention the stylometrists.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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  49.  9
    The Tacit Dimension[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):547-547.
    These Terry Lectures for 1962 develop Polanyi's notion of tacit knowing through three stages: its epistemological analysis and justification, its ontological generalization to a doctrine of (...)emergence, and its social dimension and implications. and may be briefly characterized as follows: Tacit knowledge refers to the set of particulars implicitly grasped in the explicit grasping of a comprehensive entity, the latter being the meaning of the former. Mutually supporting doctrines of epistemological isomorphism and critical realism underlie the argument, but the crucial, unjustified assumption is that tacit "knowing" is a knowing. Why not assimilate it to patterned-governed behavior explicable on an S-R model? Ontologically, the tacit component shows up as the set of particulars with their attendant structural laws which underlie but do not exhaustively define the comprehensive entities of which, due to the mechanism of emergence, they are components. Non-reducibility is evidenced by the dynamic or operational laws which govern the emergent entities, but which do not show up in the lower level account. The qualitative irreducibility of sentience is mentioned but not developed as an argument. In justifying his notion of a mechanism of emergence, Polanyi at first makes some rather obscure references to vitalism, an organismic principle, and élan vital, but then comes out with a more properly metaphysical analysis in terms of the eliciting function of a principle of potentiality. There is a definite Whiteheadian ring to the analysis, but Whitehead is nowhere mentioned. Polanyi's work deserves serious attention, and this compact presentation of some of the essentials of his thought will serve to send more readers on to, or back to, Personal Knowledge.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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  50.  6
    Phenomenology: The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl and Its Interpretation[REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (2):387-387.
    This book is a splendid piece of editing. Its format is tripartite: a consideration of specifically Husserlian themes, such as intersubjectivity, reduction, the life-world, intentionality, and (...)constitution by distinguished Husserlian scholars and, in two instances, Husserl himself; the translation and adaptation of phenomenology into existential phenomenology, the illustration of which is centered around selections from Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty with commentary support from Kockelmans, Schrag, Edie, Kwant, Natanson, and Spiegelberg; the exemplary deployment of phenomenology into the area of the human sciences, particularly psychology. In this last part the uniformly solid though sometimes non-harmonious interpretations of the relation between phenomenology and psychology are proffered by Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Kockelmans, Strasser, and Schuetz. This book would provide excellent supplementary reading for any course in phenomenology or existential phenomenology, and, in addition, for any course in the philosophy of the social sciences.—E. A. R. (shrink)
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