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Amir Raz [27]Aviad Raz [9]Aviad E. Raz [4]A. Raz [1]
  1.  36
    Can Suggestion Obviate Reading? Supplementing Primary Stroop Evidence with Exploratory Negative Priming Analyses.Amir Raz & Natasha K. J. Campbell - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):312-320.
    Using the Stroop paradigm, we have previously shown that a specific suggestion can remove or reduce involuntary conflict and alter information processing in highly suggestible individuals . In the present study, we carefully matched less suggestible individuals to HSIs on a number of factors. We hypothesized that suggestion would influence HSIs more than LSIs and reduce the Stroop effect in the former group. As well, we conducted secondary post hoc analyses to examine negative priming – the apparent disruption of the (...)
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  2.  55
    Suggestion Overrides the Stroop Effect in Highly Hypnotizable Individuals.Amir Raz, Miguel Moreno-Íñiguez, Laura Martin & Hongtu Zhu - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):331-338.
    Cognitive scientists distinguish between automatic and controlled mental processes. Automatic processes are either innately involuntary or become automatized through extensive practice. For example, reading words is a purportedly automatic process for proficient readers and the Stroop effect is consequently considered the “gold standard” of automated performance. Although the question of whether it is possible to regain control over an automatic process is mostly unasked, we provide compelling data showing that posthypnotic suggestion reduced and even removed Stroop interference in highly hypnotizable (...)
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  3.  21
    “What the Patient Wants…”: Lay Attitudes Towards End-of-Life Decisions in Germany and Israel.Julia Inthorn, Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty & Aviad Raz - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):329-340.
    National legislation, as well as arguments of experts, in Germany and Israel represent opposite regulatory approaches and positions in bioethical debates concerning end-of-life care. This study analyzes how these positions are mirrored in the attitudes of laypeople and influenced by the religious views and personal experiences of those affected. We qualitatively analyzed eight focus groups in Germany and Israel in which laypeople were asked to discuss similar scenarios involving the withholding or withdrawing of treatment, physician-assisted suicide, and euthanasia. In both (...)
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  4.  27
    The Cultural Context of Patient’s Autonomy and Doctor’s Duty: Passive Euthanasia and Advance Directives in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):363-369.
    The moral discourse surrounding end-of-life (EoL) decisions is highly complex, and a comparison of Germany and Israel can highlight the impact of cultural factors. The comparison shows interesting differences in how patient’s autonomy and doctor’s duties are morally and legally related to each other with respect to the withholding and withdrawing of medical treatment in EoL situations. Taking the statements of two national expert ethics committees on EoL in Israel and Germany (and their legal outcome) as an example of this (...)
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  5.  7
    One For All, All For One? Collective Representation in Healthcare Policy.Karin Jongsma, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Silke Schicktanz - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):337-340.
    Healthcare collectives, such as patient organizations, advocacy groups, disability organizations, professional associations, industry advocates, social movements, and health consumer organizations have been increasingly involved in healthcare policymaking. Such collectives are based on the idea that individual interests can be aggregated into collective interests by participation, deliberation, and representation. The topic of collectivity in healthcare, more specifically collective representation, has only rarely been addressed in bioethics. This symposium, entitled: “Collective Representation in Healthcare Policy” of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry draws attention (...)
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  6.  39
    Exploring the Positions of German and Israeli Patient Organizations in the Bioethical Context of End-of-Life Policies.Aviad Raz, Isabella Jordan & Silke Schicktanz - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (2):143-159.
    Patient organizations are increasingly involved in national and international bioethical debates and health policy deliberations. In order to examine how and to what extent cultural factors and organizational contexts influence the positions of patient organizations, this study compares the positions of German and Israeli patient organizations (POs) on issues related to end-of-life medical care. We draw on a qualitative pilot study of thirteen POs, using as a unit of analysis pairs comprised of one German PO and one Israeli PO that (...)
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  7.  32
    Diversity and Uniformity in Genetic Responsibility: Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People in Germany and Israel. [REVIEW]Aviad E. Raz & Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):433-442.
    The professional and institutional responsibility for handling genetic knowledge is well discussed; less attention has been paid to how lay people and particularly people who are affected by genetic diseases perceive and frame such responsibilities. In this exploratory study we qualitatively examine the attitudes of lay people, patients and relatives of patients in Germany and Israel towards genetic testing. These attitudes are further examined in the national context of Germany and Israel, which represent opposite regulatory approaches and bioethical debates concerning (...)
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  8.  78
    The Cultural Context of End-of-Life Ethics: A Comparison of Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Carmel Shalev - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):381-394.
    End-of-life decisions concerning euthanasia, stopping life-support machines, or handling advance directives are very complex and highly disputed in industrialized, democratic countries. A main controversy is how to balance the patient’s autonomy and right to self-determination with the doctor’s duty to save life and the value of life as such. These EoL dilemmas are closely linked to legal, medical, religious, and bioethical discourses. In this paper, we examine and deconstruct these linkages in Germany and Israel, moving beyond one-dimensional constructions of ethical (...)
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  9.  31
    Posthypnotic Suggestion and the Modulation of Stroop Interference Under Cycloplegia.A. Raz, S. K., R. H., R. Z., T. Shapiro, J. Fan & I. M. - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):332-346.
    Recent data indicate that under a specific posthypnotic suggestion to circumvent reading, highly suggestible subjects successfully eliminated the Stroop interference effect. The present study examined whether an optical explanation could account for this finding. Using cyclopentolate hydrochloride eye drops to pharmacologically prevent visual accommodation in all subjects, behavioral Stroop data were collected from six highly hypnotizables and six less suggestibles using an optical setup that guaranteed either sharply focused or blurred vision. The highly suggestibles performed the Stroop task when naturally (...)
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  10.  10
    Patient Representation and Advocacy for Alzheimer Disease in Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Karin Jongsma - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):369-380.
    This paper analyses self-declared aims and representation of dementia patient organizations and advocacy groups in relation to two recent upheavals: the critique of social stigmatization and biomedical research focusing on prediction. Based on twenty-six semi-structured interviews conducted in 2016–2017 with members, service recipients, and board representatives of POs in Germany and Israel, a comparative analysis was conducted, based on a grounded theory approach, to detect emerging topics within and across the POs and across national contexts. We identified a heterogeneous landscape, (...)
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  11.  16
    Influencing Choice Without Awareness.Jay A. Olson, Alym A. Amlani, Amir Raz & Ronald A. Rensink - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 37:225-236.
  12.  42
    Hypnosis as Neurophenomenology.Michael Lifshitz, Emma P. Cusumano & Amir Raz - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  13.  7
    Beyond Cultural Stereotyping: Views on End-of-Life Decision Making Among Religious and Secular Persons in the USA, Germany, and Israel.Mark Schweda, Silke Schicktanz, Aviad Raz & Anita Silvers - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):13.
    End-of-life decision making constitutes a major challenge for bioethical deliberation and political governance in modern democracies: On the one hand, it touches upon fundamental convictions about life, death, and the human condition. On the other, it is deeply rooted in religious traditions and historical experiences and thus shows great socio-cultural diversity. The bioethical discussion of such cultural issues oscillates between liberal individualism and cultural stereotyping. Our paper confronts the bioethical expert discourse with public moral attitudes. The paper is based on (...)
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  14.  18
    Simulated Thought Insertion: Influencing the Sense of Agency Using Deception and Magic.Jay A. Olson, Mathieu Landry, Krystèle Appourchaux & Amir Raz - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 43:11-26.
  15.  35
    Harnessing Psychoanalytical Methods for a Phenomenological Neuroscience.Emma P. Cusumano & Amir Raz - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  16.  34
    Can Expectation Enhance Response to Suggestion? De-Automatization Illuminates a Conundrum.Michael Lifshitz, Catherine Howells & Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1001-1008.
    Disparate theoretical viewpoints construe hypnotic suggestibility either as a stable trait, largely determined by underlying cognitive aptitude, or as a flexible skill amenable to attitudinal factors including beliefs and expectations. Circumscribed findings support both views. The present study attempted to consolidate these orthogonal perspectives through the lens of expectancy modification. We surreptitiously controlled light and sound stimuli to convince participants that they were responding strongly to hypnotic suggestions for visual and auditory hallucinations. Extending our previous findings, we indexed hypnotic suggestibility (...)
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  17.  21
    Posthypnotic Suggestion and the Modulation of Stroop Interference Under Cycloplegia.Amir Raz, Kim S. Landzberg, Heather R. Schweizer, Zohar R. Zephrani, Theodore Shapiro, Jin Fan & Michael I. Posner - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):332-346.
    Recent data indicate that under a specific posthypnotic suggestion to circumvent reading, highly suggestible subjects successfully eliminated the Stroop interference effect. The present study examined whether an optical explanation could account for this finding. Using cyclopentolate hydrochloride eye drops to pharmacologically prevent visual accommodation in all subjects, behavioral Stroop data were collected from six highly hypnotizables and six less suggestibles using an optical setup that guaranteed either sharply focused or blurred vision. The highly suggestibles performed the Stroop task when naturally (...)
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  18.  59
    Varieties of Attention in Hypnosis and Meditation.Michael Lifshitz, Natasha Kj Campbell & Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1582-1585.
  19.  22
    Suggestion Overrides Automatic Audiovisual Integration.Catherine Déry, Natasha K. J. Campbell, Michael Lifshitz & Amir Raz - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24:33-37.
    Cognitive scientists routinely distinguish between controlled and automatic mental processes. Through learning, practice, and exposure, controlled processes can become automatic; however, whether automatic processes can become deautomatized – recuperated under the purview of control – remains unclear. Here we show that a suggestion derails a deeply ingrained process involving involuntary audiovisual integration. We compared the performance of highly versus less hypnotically suggestible individuals in a classic McGurk paradigm – a perceptual illusion task demonstrating the influence of visual facial movements on (...)
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  20.  67
    Hypnosis: A Twilight Zone of the Top-Down Variety: Few Have Never Heard of Hypnosis but Most Know Little About the Potential of This Mind–Body Regulation Technique for Advancing Science.Amir Raz - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):555-557.
  21.  42
    Hypnosis as a Lens to the Development of Attention.Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1595-1598.
  22.  28
    America' Meets `Japan.Jacob Raz & Aviad E. Raz - 1996 - Theory, Culture and Society 13 (3):153-178.
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  23.  18
    Converging Evidence for de-Automatization as a Function of Suggestion.Natasha Kj Campbell, Ilia M. Blinderman, Michael Lifshitz & Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1579-1581.
  24.  25
    Hypnosis: A Twilight Zone of the Top-Down Variety.Amir Raz - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):555-557.
  25.  12
    Deliberate Use of Placebos in Clinical Practice: What We Really Know.Cory S. Harris & Amir Raz - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (7):406-407.
    Next SectionIncreasingly a focus of research as well as media reports and online forums, the use of placebos in clinical medicine extends beyond sugar pills and saline injections. Physician surveys conducted in various countries invariably report that placebos are routinely used clinically, impure placebos more frequently than the pure ones, and that physicians consider them to be of legitimate therapeutic value. Inconsistent study methodologies and physician conceptualisations of placebos may complicate the interpretation of survey data, but hardly negate the valuable (...)
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  26.  20
    Is There a Place for (Deceptive) Placebos Within Clinical Practice?Amir Raz, Cory S. Harris, Veronica de Jong & Hillel Braude - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):52-54.
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  27.  41
    Subsidiary Analysis of Different Stroop-Embedded Negative Priming Trials.Natasha Kj Campbell & Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1586-1590.
  28.  31
    Where in the Brain Does the Forward Model Lurk?Opher Donchin & Amir Raz - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):402-403.
    The general applicability of forward models in brain function has previously been recognized. Grush's contribution centers largely on broadening the extent and scope of forward models. However, in his effort to expand and generalize, important distinctions may have been overlooked. A better grounding in the underlying physiology would have helped to illuminate such valuable differences and similarities.
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  29. Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis.Tobias Egner & Amir Raz - 2007 - In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. pp. 29-50.
  30.  10
    The Authorized Self: How Middle Age Defines Old Age in the Postmodern.Haim Hazan & Aviad E. Raz - 1997 - Semiotica 113 (3-4):257-276.
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  31.  18
    The Marginalization of Phenomenological Consciousness.Ethan B. Macdonald & Amir Raz - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  32.  6
    Explanations of a Magic Trick Across the Life Span.Jay A. Olson, Irina Demacheva & Amir Raz - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  33.  19
    A Social Psychologist Illuminates Cognition.Amir Raz & Kim L. Norman - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):673-674.
    Sprinkled with humor, social psychology illuminates cognition in Wegner's beautifully written and cleverly crafted book. However, scantily exploiting such themes as psychopathology, development, and neural correlates of consciousness, Wegner's account does not fully project into cognitive neuroscience. Broaching the topic of self-regulation, we outline neurocognitive data supplementing the notion that voluntariness is perhaps more post hoc ascriptions than bona fide introspection.
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  34.  29
    A Zetetic's Perspective on Gesture, Speech, and the Evolution of Right-Handedness.Amir Raz & Opher Donchin - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):237-238.
    Charmed by Corballis's presentation, we challenge the use of mirror neurons as a supporting platform for the gestural theory of language, the link between vocalization and cerebral specialization, and the relationship between gesture and language as two separate albeit coupled systems of communication. We revive an alternative explanation of lateralization of language and handedness.
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  35.  1
    Comparing Germany and Israel regarding debates on policy-making at the beginning of life: PGD, NIPT and their paths of routinization.Aviad E. Raz, Tamar Nov-Klaiman, Yael Hashiloni-Dolev, Hannes Foth, Christina Schües & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter - forthcoming - Ethik in der Medizin:1-16.
    DefinitionThe routinization of prenatal diagnosis is the source of bioethical and policy debates regarding choice, autonomy, access, and protection. To understand these debates in the context of cultural diversity and moral pluralism, we compare Israel and Germany, focusing on two recent repro-genetic “hot spots” of such policy-making at the beginning of life: pre-implantation genetic diagnosis and non-invasive prenatal genetic testing, two cutting-edge repro-genetic technologies that are regulated and viewed very differently in Germany and Israel, reflecting different medicolegal policies as well (...)
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  36.  14
    From Repression and Attention to Culture and Automaticity.Amir Raz & Horacio Fabrega - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):530-530.
    Erdelyi grants emotional and cognitive qualities that can modulate consciousness and probably overlap with what is typically attributed to Such a broad appellation of repression explains virtually all behavior and lacks specificity. Repression and attention elucidate behavior in different clinical, cognitive, and cultural contexts. Refining these influences, we identify a few lacunae in Erdelyi's account.
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  37.  2
    Saving or Subordinating Life? Popular Views in Israel and Germany of Donor Siblings Created Through PGD.Aviad Raz, Christina Schües, Nadja Wilhelm & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (2):191-207.
    To explore how cultural beliefs are reflected in different popular views of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for human leukocyte antigen match, we compare the reception and interpretations, in Germany and Israel, of the novel/film My Sister’s Keeper. Qualitative analysis of reviews, commentaries and posts is used to classify and compare normative assessments of PGD for HLA and how they reproduce, negotiate or oppose the national policy and its underlying cultural and ethical premises. Four major themes emanated from the comparison: loss of (...)
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  38.  12
    Translational Attention: From Experiments in the Lab to Helping the Symptoms of Individuals with Tourette’s Syndrome.Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1591-1594.
  39.  25
    Responsibility Revisited.Silke Schicktanz & Aviad Raz - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):129-130.
    Recent developments in medicine open up new possibilities for planning and shaping life. At the same time, this scope of new options and interventions also involves new forms and spheres of responsibilities. Elderly persons can be viewed as having a responsibility toward their families and partners to plan, via advance health care directives, the final stages of their life; individuals can be seen as responsible for late onset diseases when ignoring public incitements for a healthy life style; and medical professionals (...)
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