6 found
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  1.  25
    Should a For-Profit Corporation Own and Operate a University?A. Scott Carson - 2007 - Philosophy of Management 6 (1):17-34.
    For-profit universities are degree-granting institutions that are owned and operated by business corporations. This paper addresses two related public policy questions about for-profit universities. First, should governments and appropriate regulatory bodies permit for-profit universities to grant degrees in their jurisdiction? Second, should higher education policy be developed to create for-profit universities? In this paper, a property rights argument is presented to demonstrate that a corporation should have the right to offer degrees if certain regulatory tests can be met. In limited (...)
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  2.  26
    For-Profit Degree Granting Institutions in Three Countries.A. Scott Carson - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:377-382.
    For-profit degree granting institutions are a growing and under-researched market segment that represents an extreme level of business involvement in academe. Permitting such institutions to grant degrees is a concern because the profit motive gives an incentive to operators to misrepresent the quality and benefits of such degrees. This paper addresses the issue of how adequately government quality assurance processes are able to protect the public interest. The degree program approval processes in three countries are evaluated using the UNESCO guidelines (...)
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  3.  22
    A Framework for Business Ethics Education.A. Scott Carson - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 10:185-210.
    Business schools are frequently blamed for corporate ethical scandals by failing to develop integrity and critical ethical thinking skills in managers. What should business schools teach to address this? The paper proposes a framework for the development and evaluation of a business ethics curriculum, which is grounded on the AACSB learning goals of ethical understanding, reasoning abilities, managerial knowledge and ethical capacities. The framework is two building blocks in the form of tests, which together provide quality measures for business ethics (...)
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  4.  16
    Codes of Ethics.A. Scott Carson - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:43-54.
    This paper presents a philosophical critique of intuitionism and other current theories of rationality that underlie and, in some cases, question the cogency of codes of ethics. A classical theory of rationality is defended and a concept of ‘reasonableness’ is developed as an ideal-type in setting out the principles for an effective ethical education that can form the basis for implementing a code of conduct.
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  5.  4
    Environmental Legislation and Harms to Remote Resource‐Based Communities: The Case of Atikokan, Ontario.A. Scott Carson - 2010 - Business and Society Review 115 (4):437-466.
    ABSTRACTEnvironmental ethics research pays much attention to the rights of individuals, future generations, and nonhuman stakeholders to have a clean environment. Moral condemnation is directed at polluters for violation of stakeholder rights. However, little consideration is given in the research literature to those who are harmed by well‐intended progressive environmental legislation. This article addresses the moral entitlements of small, remote resource‐based communities not to be harmed by environmental legislation that results in the elimination of the major employer that economically sustains (...)
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  6.  25
    Vulture Investors, Predators of the 90s: An Ethical Examination.A. Scott Carson - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (5):543-555.
    Investment in financially distressed companies has taken place since the end of the depression. But a new breed of predatory activist investors called "vultures" has emerged in recent years. They take sizable debt positions in insolvent companies with the intention of significantly increasing the value of their investment through aggressive negotiation either in bankruptcy or in pre-bankruptcy restructurings. Predators thrive on adversarial conflict. Vulture investment is legal, but is it morally acceptable? This paper argues that the strategies and tactics of (...)
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