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Aaron L. Mackler [12]Aaron Leonard Mackler [1]
  1.  38
    Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis.Aaron L. Mackler - 2003 - Georgetown University Press.
    " This book has been carefully crafted in that spirit.
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  2. Judaism, Justice, and Access to Health Care.Aaron L. Mackler - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (2):143-161.
    This paper develops the traditional Jewish understanding of justice (tzedakah) and support for the needy, especially as related to the provision of medical care. After an examination of justice in the Hebrew Bible, the values and institutions of tzedakah in Rabbinic Judaism are explored, with a focus on legal codes and enforceable obligations. A standard of societal responsibility to provide for the basic needs of all, with a special obligation to save lives, emerges. A Jewish view of justice in access (...)
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  3. Jewish Perspectives on Abortion.Aaron L. Mackler - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  4.  27
    Letters, Notes, & Comments.Aaron L. Mackler, Elie Kaplan Spitz & G. Scott Davis - 1999 - Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):361 - 374.
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  5.  35
    Respecting Bodies and Saving Lives: Jewish Perspectives on Organ Donation and Transplantation.Aaron L. Mackler - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):420-429.
    Organ donation and transplantation touch on profound, and at times elusive, values and beliefs. These involve personal identity, embodiment, the relationship between the individual and the community, and death. Different cultural and religious perspectives, reflecting deeply ingrained but often unspoken assumptions about human identity and responsibilities, subtly but profoundly affect attitudes to donation and transplantation.
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  6.  8
    Homosexuality: A Case Study in Jewish Ethics.Elliot N. Dorff, David Novak & Aaron L. Mackler - 2008 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 28 (1):225-235.
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  7.  33
    Jewish and Roman Catholic Approaches to Access to Health Care and Rationing.Aaron L. Mackler - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (4):317-336.
    : In addressing issues of access to health care and rationing, Jewish and Roman Catholic writers identify similar guiding values and specific concerns. Moral thinkers in each tradition tend to support the guarantee of universal access to at least a basic level of health care for all members of society, based on such values as human dignity, justice, and healing. Catholic writers are more likely to frame their arguments in terms of the common good and to be more accepting of (...)
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  8.  7
    Heal Thyself: Spirituality, Medicine, and the Distortion of Christianity.Aaron L. Mackler - 2006 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 26 (1):198-199.
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  9. Cases and Principles in Jewish Bioethics: Toward a Holistic Model.Aaron L. Mackler - 1995 - In Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.), Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press. pp. 177--193.
     
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  10.  7
    An Expanded Partnership with God? In Vitro Fertilization in Jewish Ethics.Aaron L. Mackler - 1997 - Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (2):277-304.
    Judaism has understood procreation as representing a partnership between God and humans, calling for both human reverence and action. The development of in vitro fertilization raises questions about the implications of this partnership and applications of this technology. A holistic approach to Jewish ethics, drawing on traditional sources, suggests that it can be appropriate for an infertile couple to utilize IVF using their own sperm and egg to have a child. The use of donated sperm, eggs, and embryos raises significant (...)
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