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Aaron Stalnaker [20]Aaron D. Stalnaker [1]
  1.  69
    Virtue as Mastery in Early Confucianism.Aaron Stalnaker - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):404-428.
    This essay explores the interrelation of skills and virtues. I first trace one line of analysis from Aristotle to Alasdair MacIntyre, which argues that there is a categorical difference between skills and virtues, in their ends and intrinsic character. This familiar distinction is fine in certain respects but still importantly misleading. Virtue in general, and also some particular virtues such as ritual propriety and practical wisdom, are not just exercised in practical contexts, but are in fact partially constituted by the (...)
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  2.  18
    On Comparative Religious Ethics as a Field of Study.Elizabeth M. Bucar & Aaron Stalnaker - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):358-384.
    This essay is a critical engagement with recent assessments of comparative religious ethics by John Kelsay and Jung Lee. Contra Kelsay's proposal to return to a neo-Weberian sociology of religious norm elaboration and justification, the authors argue that comparative religious ethics is and should be practiced as a field of study in active conversation with other fields that consider human flourishing, employing a variety of methods that have their roots in multiple disciplines. Cross-pollination from a variety of disciplines is a (...)
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  3.  41
    Confucianism, Democracy, and the Virtue of Deference.Aaron Stalnaker - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):441-459.
    Some democratic theorists have argued that contemporary people should practice only a civility that recognizes others as equal persons, and eschew any form of deference to authority as a feudalistic cultural holdover that ought to be abandoned in the modern era. Against such views, this essay engages early Confucian views of ethics and society, including their analyses of different sorts of authority and status, in order to argue that, properly understood, deference is indeed a virtue of considerable importance for contemporary (...)
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  4.  56
    Comparative Religious Ethics and the Problem of “Human Nature”.Aaron Stalnaker - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):187-224.
    Comparative religious ethics is a complicated scholarly endeavor, striving to harmonize intellectual goals that are frequently conceived as quite different, or even intrinsically opposed. Against commonly voiced suspicions of comparative work, this essay argues that descriptive, comparative, and normative interests may support rather than conflict with each other, depending on the comparison in question, and how it is pursued. On the basis of a brief comparison of the early Christian Augustine of Hippo and the early Confucians Mencius and Xunzi on (...)
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  5.  34
    Anthropos and Ethics Categories of Inquiry and Procedures of Comparison.Thomas A. Lewis, Jonathan Wyn Schofer, Aaron Stalnaker & Mark A. Berkson - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):177-185.
    Building on influential work in virtue ethics, this collection of essays examines the categories of self, person, and anthropology as foci for comparative analysis. The papers unite reflections on theory and method with descriptive work that addresses thinkers from the modern West, Christian and Jewish Late Antiquity, early China, and other settings. The introduction sets out central methodological issues that are subsequently taken up in each essay, including the origin of the categories through which comparison proceeds, the status of these (...)
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  6.  10
    Anthropos and Ethics: Categories of Inquiry and Procedures of Comparison.Thomas A. Lewis, Jonathan Wyn Schofer, Aaron Stalnaker & Mark A. Berkson - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):177 - 185.
    Building on influential work in virtue ethics, this collection of essays examines the categories of self, person, and anthropology as foci for comparative analysis. The papers unite reflections on theory and method with descriptive work that addresses thinkers from the modern West, Christian and Jewish Late Antiquity, early China, and other settings. The introduction sets out central methodological issues that are subsequently taken up in each essay, including the origin of the categories through which comparison proceeds, the status of these (...)
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  7.  30
    Judging Others: History, Ethics, and the Purposes of Comparison.Aaron Stalnaker - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):425-444.
    The most interesting and perilous issue at present in comparative religious ethics is comparative ethical judgment—when and how to judge others, if at all. There are understandable historical and conceptual reasons for the current tendency to prefer descriptive over normative work in comparative religious ethics. However, judging those we study is inescapable—it can be suppressed or marginalized but not eliminated. Therefore, the real question is how to judge others (and ourselves) well, not whether to judge. Instead of bringing supposedly universal (...)
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  8.  16
    Xunzi's Moral Analysis of War and Some of its Contemporary Implications.Aaron Stalnaker - 2012 - Journal of Military Ethics 11 (2):97-113.
    Abstract The early Ru or ?Confucian? figure Xunzi (?Master Xun,? c. 310?c. 220 BCE) gives a sophisticated analysis of war, which he develops on the basis of a larger social and political vision that he works out in considerable detail. This larger vision of human society is thoroughly normative in the sense that Xunzi both argues for the value of his ideal conception of society, and relates these moral arguments for the Confucian Dao or Way to what I take to (...)
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  9.  12
    In Defense of Ritual Propriety.Aaron Stalnaker - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):117--141.
    Confucians think ritual propriety is extremely important, but this commitment perplexes many Western readers. This essay outlines the early Confucian Xúnzǐ’s defense of ritual, then offers a modified defense of ritual propriety as a real virtue, of value to human beings in all times and places, albeit one that is inescapably indexed to prevailing social norms in a non-objectionable way. The paper addresses five likely objections to this thesis, drawing on but going beyond recent Kantian defenses of courtesy and civility. (...)
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  10. Aspects of Xunzi's Engagement with Early Daoism.Aaron Stalnaker - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (1):87-129.
    : Xunzi borrows several significant ideas originating in the Zhuangzi and the ''Neiye'' chapter of the Guanzi, adapting them to solve problems in his own theories of mind and self-cultivation. This reworking occurs in three main areas. First, he uses some of the psycho-physical terminology of the ''Neiye'' but alters its cosmological background and thus its implications for selfcultivation. Second, largely for rhetorical effect he adopts the language of shen and shenming from both texts, but uses them to argue for (...)
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  11.  9
    Comparative Religious Ethics.Aaron Stalnaker - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  12.  55
    Rational Justification in Xunzi: On His Use of the Term Li.Aaron Stalnaker - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):53-68.
    Thinkers justify their views in a variety of ways. Operating in an alien intellectual milieu, the early Confucian Xunzi provides an intriguing counterpoint to familiar contemporary options for such reasoned support. This essay examines an idea thatis crucial to Xunzi’s justification of his larger philosophical vision, and which has been the object of incompatible and misleading interpretations. This key term of art is li, meaning “order” or “pattern,” which some scholars have translated as “principle,” and others more recently as “reason” (...)
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  13. Overcoming Our Evil: Spiritual Exercises and Personhood in Xunzi and Augustine.Aaron D. Stalnaker - 2001 - Dissertation, Brown University
    This dissertation compares the thought and practice of Xunzi, a 4th--3rd century BCE Confucian, with that of Augustine of Hippo, a 4th--5th century CE Christian. Specifically, it compares their versions of the view that human nature is significantly bad or evil, and their prescriptions for the cultivation of ethically and religiously preferable modes of life, through the practice of what Pierre Hadot has called "spiritual exercises." ;Xunzi and Augustine deploy conceptual apparatuses structured by distinctive terms of art, responding to debates (...)
     
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  14.  1
    Spiritual Exercises and the Grace of God.Aaron Stalnaker - 2004 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 24 (2):137-170.
    AUGUSTINE'S MATURE, ANTI-PELAGIAN UNDERSTANDING OF HUMAN AND divine willing might appear to conflict with his advocacy of human striving to "make progress in righteousness" through various practices of personal reformation. In this essay I consider exercises such as reading and listening to scripture, fasting, and Eucharistie worship; I argue that although deep tensions exist in Augustine's account, ultimately they are not contradictions. Furthermore, recent attempts to retrieve "spiritual exercises" or askesis for contemporary ethical reflection would do well to grapple with (...)
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  15.  26
    COVID‐19 and Religious Ethics.Toni Alimi, Elizabeth L. Antus, Alda Balthrop‐Lewis, James F. Childress, Shannon Dunn, Ronald M. Green, Eric Gregory, Jennifer A. Herdt, Willis Jenkins, M. Cathleen Kaveny, Vincent W. Lloyd, Ping‐Cheung Lo, Jonathan Malesic, David Newheiser, Irene Oh & Aaron Stalnaker - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (3):349-387.
    The editors of the JRE solicited short essays on the COVID‐19 pandemic from a group of scholars of religious ethics that reflected on how the field might help them make sense of the complex religious, cultural, ethical, and political implications of the pandemic, and on how the pandemic might shape the future of religious ethics.
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  16. Augustine and World Religions.Michael Barnes, Francis X. Clooney, Olivier Dufault, Paula Fredriksen, Franklin T. Harkins, Paul J. Lachance, Leo Lefebure, Reid Locklin, C. C. Pecknold & Aaron Stalnaker - 2008 - Lexington Books.
    Despite Augustine's reputation as the father of Christian intolerance, one finds in his thought the surprising claim that within non-Christian writings there are 'some truths in regard even to the worship of the One God.' The essays here uncover provocative points of comparison and similarity between Christianity and other religions to further such an Augustinian dialogue.
     
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  17. Religious Ethics in a Time of Globalism: Shaping a Third Wave of Comparative Analysis.Elizabeth M. Bucar & Aaron Stalnaker (eds.) - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  18.  18
    Kline, T. C. III, and Justin Tiwald, Eds., Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi: Albany: State University of New York Press, 2014, Viii + 197 Pages.Aaron Stalnaker - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):615-619.
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  19.  3
    Relations and Practices of Virtue: Replies to Commentators.Aaron Stalnaker - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (2):525-536.
    I would like to thank the commentators for the care and sympathy evident in their excellent responses to my book.1 They delve deeply into numerous critical issues. It is truly satisfying to labor greatly and then experience such thoughtful attention directed toward one's work. Given that some parallel issues were raised by different people, in what follows I organize my responses around key themes in order to address most of the issues raised with minimal repetition.It is worth noting at the (...)
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  20.  3
    The Innocuous Legacy of Christian Ethics in Comparative Religious Ethics.Aaron Stalnaker - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (4):778-780.
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  21.  13
    The Mencius-Xunzi Debate in Early Confucian Ethics.Aaron Stalnaker - 2008 - In Jeffrey L. Richey (ed.), Teaching Confucianism. Oxford University Press. pp. 85.
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