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  1.  8
    Using the Maqāṣid Al-Sharīʿah to Furnish an Islamic Bioethics: Conceptual and Practical Issues.Aasim I. Padela - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (3):347-352.
    The field of Islamic bioethics is currently in development as thinkers delineate its normative content, ethical scope and research methods. Some scholars have offered Islamic bioethical frameworks based on the maqāṣid al-Sharīʿah, the higher objectives of Islamic law, to help advance the field. Accordingly, a recent JBI paper by Ibrahim and colleagues describes a method for using the maqāṣid al-Sharīʿah to provide moral end-goals and deliberative mechanisms for an Islamic bioethics. Herein I highlight critical conceptual and practical gaps in the (...)
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  2.  46
    Brain Death in Islamic Ethico-Legal Deliberation: Challenges for Applied Islamic Bioethics.Aasim I. Padela, Ahsan Arozullah & Ebrahim Moosa - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):132-139.
    Since the 1980s, Islamic scholars and medical experts have used the tools of Islamic law to formulate ethico-legal opinions on brain death. These assessments have varied in their determinations and remain controversial. Some juridical councils such as the Organization of Islamic Conferences' Islamic Fiqh Academy (OIC-IFA) equate brain death with cardiopulmonary death, while others such as the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences (IOMS) analogize brain death to an intermediate state between life and death. Still other councils have repudiated the notion (...)
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  3.  10
    Islamic Perspectives on Clinical Intervention Near the End-of-Life: We Can but Must We?Aasim I. Padela & Omar Qureshi - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):545-559.
    The ever-increasing technological advances of modern medicine have increased physicians’ capacity to carry out a wide array of clinical interventions near the end-of-life. These new procedures have resulted in new “types” of living where a patient’s cognitive functions are severely diminished although many physiological functions remain active. In this biomedical context, patients, surrogate decision-makers, and clinicians all struggle with decisions about what clinical interventions to pursue and when therapeutic intent should be replaced with palliative goals of care. For some patients (...)
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  4.  49
    [Re]Considering Respect for Persons in a Globalizing World.Aasim I. Padela, Aisha Y. Malik, Farr Curlin & Raymond De Vries - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (2):98-106.
    Contemporary clinical ethics was founded on principlism, and the four principles: respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice, remain dominant in medical ethics discourse and practice. These principles are held to be expansive enough to provide the basis for the ethical practice of medicine across cultures. Although principlism remains subject to critique and revision, the four-principle model continues to be taught and applied across the world. As the practice of medicine globalizes, it remains critical to examine the extent to which (...)
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  5.  39
    Dire Necessity and Transformation: Entry‐Points for Modern Science in Islamic Bioethical Assessment of Porcine Products in Vaccines.Aasim I. Padela, Steven W. Furber, Mohammad A. Kholwadia & Ebrahim Moosa - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (2):59-66.
    The field of medicine provides an important window through which to examine the encounters between religion and science, and between modernity and tradition. While both religion and science consider health to be a ‘good’ that is to be preserved, and promoted, religious and science-based teachings may differ in their conception of what constitutes good health, and how that health is to be achieved. This paper analyzes the way the Islamic ethico-legal tradition assesses the permissibility of using vaccines that contain porcine-derived (...)
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  6.  13
    Producing Parenthood: Islamic Bioethical Perspectives & Normative Implications.Aasim I. Padela, Katherine Klima & Rosie Duivenbode - 2020 - The New Bioethics 26 (1):17-37.
    Biomedicine has opened up new possibilities for parenthood. Once resigned to remaining childless or pursuing adoption, infertile couples can now pursue options such as gamete donation, in-vitro fer...
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  7.  63
    Islamic Medical Ethics: A Primer.Aasim I. Padela - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):169–178.
    ABSTRACTModern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic Medical Ethics literature, from that aimed at (...)
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  8.  20
    When Must a Patient Seek Healthcare? Bringing the Perspectives of Islamic Jurists and Clinicians Into Dialogue.Omar Qureshi & Aasim I. Padela - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):592-625.
    Muslim physicians and Islamic jurists analyze the moral dimensions of biomedicine using different tools and processes. While the deliberations of these two classes of experts involve judgments about the deliverables of the other's respective fields, Islamic jurists and Muslim physicians rarely engage in discussions about the constructs and epistemic frameworks that motivate their analyses. The lack of dialogue creates gaps in knowledge and leads to imprecise guidance. In order to address these discursive and conceptual gaps we describe the sources of (...)
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  9.  60
    Islamic Bioethics: Between Sacred Law, Lived Experiences, and State Authority.Aasim I. Padela - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):65-80.
    There is burgeoning interest in the field of “Islamic” bioethics within public and professional circles, and both healthcare practitioners and academic scholars deploy their respective expertise in attempts to cohere a discipline of inquiry that addresses the needs of contemporary bioethics stakeholders while using resources from within the Islamic ethico-legal tradition. This manuscript serves as an introduction to the present thematic issue dedicated to Islamic bioethics. Using the collection of papers as a guide the paper outlines several critical questions that (...)
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  10.  26
    Framing the Mind–Body Problem in Contemporary Neuroscientific and Sunni Islamic Theological Discourse.Faisal Qazi, Don Fette, Syed S. Jafri & Aasim I. Padela - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (2):158-175.
    Famously posed by seventeenth-century French philosopher René Descartes, the mind–body problem remains unresolved in western philosophy and science, with both disciplines unable to move convincingly beyond the dualistic model. The persistence of dualism calls for a reframing of the problem through interdisciplinary modes of inquiry that include non-western points of view. One such perspective is Islamic theology of the soul, which, while approaching the problem from a distinct point of view, also adopts a position commensurate with dualism. Using this point (...)
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  11.  14
    Islamic Medical Ethics: A Primer.Aasim I. Padela - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):169-178.
    ABSTRACTModern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic Medical Ethics literature, from that aimed at (...)
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  12.  39
    Muslim Patients and Cross-Gender Interactions in Medicine: An Islamic Bioethical Perspective.Aasim I. Padela & Pablo Rodriguez del Pozo - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):40-44.
    As physicians encounter an increasingly diverse patient population, socioeconomic circumstances, religious values and cultural practices may present barriers to the delivery of quality care. Increasing cultural competence is often cited as a way to reduce healthcare disparities arising from value and cultural differences between patients and providers. Cultural competence entails not only a knowledge base of cultural practices of disparate patient populations, but also an attitude of adapting one's practice style to meet patient needs and values. Gender roles, relationship dynamics (...)
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  13.  80
    The Interplay Between Religious Leaders and Organ Donation Among Muslims.Shoaib A. Rasheed & Aasim I. Padela - 2013 - Zygon 48 (3):635-654.
    Bioethics and health researchers often turn to Islamic jurisconsults (fuqahā’) and their verdicts (fatāwā) to understand how Islam and health intersect. Yet when using fatwā to promote health behavior change, researchers have often found less than ideal results. In this article we examine several health behavior change interventions that partnered with Muslim religious leaders aiming at promoting organ donation. As these efforts have generally met with limited success, we reanalyze these efforts through the lens of the theory of planned behavior, (...)
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  14.  68
    Islamic Verdicts in Health Policy Discourse: Porcine‐Based Vaccines as a Case Study.Aasim I. Padela - 2013 - Zygon 48 (3):655-670.
    In this article, I apply a policy-oriented applied Islamic bioethics lens to two verdicts on the permissibility of using vaccines with porcine components. I begin by reviewing the decrees and then proceed to describe how they were used by health policy stakeholders. Subsequently, My analysis will highlight aspects of the verdict's ethico-legal arguments in order to illustrate salient legal concepts that must be accounted for when using Islamic verdicts as the basis for health policy. I will conclude with several suggestions (...)
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  15.  8
    Treating Infertility with Transplantation: Theological Views on Whether Infertility is a Disease.Aasim I. Padela & Kristel Clayville - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (7):40-42.
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  16.  16
    Erratum.Aasim I. Padela, A. Arozullah, E. Moosa & Kiarash Aramesh - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):56-56.
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  17.  12
    Adaband its Significance for an Islamic Medical Ethics.Elizabeth Sartell & Aasim I. Padela - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):756-761.
  18.  3
    The Problem of Female Genital Cutting: Bridging Secular and Islamic Bioethical Perspectives.Rosie Duivenbode & Aasim I. Padela - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (2):273-300.
    Recent events in the United States and beyond have brought debates over the practice of female genital cutting back into public, academic, and policy discourses.1 In April 2017, Jumana Nagarwala, a Michigan-based emergency medicine physician from a small Shia sect known as the Dawoodi Bohra, was charged with performing female genital mutilation. The procedure is prohibited by federal law and defined as the circumcision, excision, or infibulation of the whole or any part of the female genitalia under the age of (...)
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  19.  2
    When Can Muslims Withdraw or Withhold Life Support? A Narrative Review of Islamic Juridical Rulings.Afshan Mohiuddin, Mehrunisha Suleman, Shoaib Rasheed & Aasim I. Padela - 2020 - Tandf: Global Bioethics 31 (1):29-46.
    When it is ethically justifiable to stop medical treatment? For many Muslim patients, families, and clinicians this ethical question remains a challenging one as Islamic ethico-legal guidance on such matters remains scattered and difficult to interpret. In light of this gap, we conducted a systematic literature review to aggregate rulings from Islamic jurists and juridical councils on whether, and when, it is permitted to withdraw and/or withhold life-sustaining care. A total of 16 fatwās were found, 8 of which were single-author (...)
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  20.  30
    Faculty of Responsibility: A Key Concept to Cope with the Ethical Challenges Medical Students Face.Orhan Onder & Aasim I. Padela - 2020 - Journal of the British Islamic Medical Association 4 (2):23-26.
    During their educational life, medical students encounter several challenges, the origins and causes of which vary. This paper explores and attempts to scrutinize two of these challenges, before eventually introducing the concept of responsibility. First, this paper describes the general characteristics of medical schools, medical students, and medical education. Second, two different ethical challenges that medical students confront are then delineated: the anxiety of continuously questioning ‘while being trained, do I cause patients to receive suboptimal health care?’ and occasionally feeling (...)
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  21.  18
    Female Genital Cutting (FGC) and the Cultural Boundaries of Medical Practice.Aasim I. Padela & Rosie Duivenbode - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):3-6.
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  22.  16
    Genethics and Human Reproduction: Religious Perspectives in the Academic Bioethics Literature.Aasim I. Padela & Mariel Kalkach Aparicio - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):153-171.
    The successes of the human genome project and genomics research programs portend great potential to improve upon health and enhance life. As scientific advancements continue, bioethicists and policy makers deliberate over the social and ethical implications of genetic and genomic technologies and information. The application of ggT/I to human reproduction raises conceptual and moral questions about being human and the links between offspring, parents, and society. Given ggT/I’s ability to significantly affect the biological constitution of humans and future human generations (...)
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  23.  2
    Islamic Perspectives on Clinical Intervention Near the End of Life: We Can but Must We?Aasim I. Padela & Omar Qureshi - 2019 - In Timothy D. Knepper, Lucy Bregman & Mary Gottschalk (eds.), Death and Dying : An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion. Springer Verlag. pp. 201-225.
    The ever-increasing technological advances of modern medicine have increased physicians’ capacity to carry out a wide array of clinical interventions near the end of life. These new procedures have resulted in new “types” of living where a patient’s cognitive functions are severely diminished although many physiological functions remain active. In this biomedical context, patients, surrogate decision-makers, and clinicians all struggle with decisions about what clinical interventions to pursue and when therapeutic intent should be replaced with palliative goals of care. For (...)
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  24.  47
    Religious Identity and Workplace Discrimination: A National Survey of American Muslim Physicians.Aasim I. Padela, Huda Adam, Maha Ahmad, Zahra Hosseinian & Farr Curlin - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):149-159.
  25.  13
    Social Responsibility and the State's Duty to Provide Healthcare: An Islamic Ethico‐Legal Perspective.Aasim I. Padela - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):205-214.
    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights asserts that governments are morally obliged to promote health and to provide access to quality healthcare, essential medicines and adequate nutrition and water to all members of society. According to UNESCO, this obligation is grounded in a moral commitment to promoting fundamental human rights and emerges from the principle of social responsibility. Yet in an era of ethical pluralism and contentions over the universality of human rights (...)
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