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  1.  59
    A Meta-Ethical Critique of Care Ethics.Abraham Rudnick - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (6):505-517.
    A meta-ethical analysis demonstrates that care ethics is a grounded in a distinct mode of moral reasoning. This is comprised primarily of the rejection of principles such as impartiality, and the endorsement of emotional or moral virtues such as compassion, as well as the notion that the preservation of relations may override the interests of the individuals involved in them. The main conclusion of such a meta-ethical analysis is that such meta-ethical foundations of care ethics are not sound. Reasonable alternatives (...)
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  2.  6
    The Ends of Medical Intervention and the Demarcation of the Normal From the Pathological.Abraham Rudnick - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (5):569 – 580.
    This study examines the ends of medical intervention and argues that mainstream contemporary medicine assumes that appropriate ends may be discovered (i.e., naturalism), rather than created or decided upon (i.e., conventionalism). The essay then applies these considerations to the problem of the demarcation of the normal from the pathological. I argue that the common formulations of this dispute commit a fallacy, as they characterize the "normal" as a state of the organism and not as an ongoing process within it. Such (...)
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  3.  5
    The Ground of Dialogical Bioethics.Abraham Rudnick - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (4):391-402.
    Dialogical ethics are a procedural alternative to substantive ethics such as consequentialism, deontology, principlism, casuistry, virtue ethics and care ethics. Dialogical ethics are procedural in that they do not establish goods in advance, unlike substantive ethics, but rather determine goods through a procedure enacted by the actual parties involved (although some substantive notion of justice may still be required); and they are dialogical in that the procedure is that of dialogue, involving both empathic critical discussion and negotiation. A fundamental tenet (...)
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  4. Informed Consent to Breaking Bad News.Abraham Rudnick - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (1):61-66.
    Informed consent to breaking (or waiving) bad news is an important yet neglected topic. It is distinct from informed consent to diagnosis and to treatment, and may be logically and ethically sound, provided patients are competent and that no considerable harm may be caused to others by breaking or waiving bad news to patients. This requires a differential assessment procedure in order to balance patient autonomy, benefit and justice towards others, preferably exploring patients’ values, expectations and needs with them, so (...)
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  5. Psychiatric Rehabilitation and the Notion of Technology in Psychiatry.Abraham Rudnick - 2009 - In James Phillips (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Technology and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 203--213.
     
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  6.  18
    Paranoia and Reinforced Dogmatism: Beyond Critical Rationality.Abraham Rudnick - 2003 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (3):339-350.
    Deviant forms of human thought may provide insight into epistemic standards, such as rationality. A comparative analysis of paranoia and reinforced dogmatism suggests that reinforced dogmatism, such as pseudo-science a-la-Popper, demonstrates a primary epistemic lack of critical rationality, that is, of testability, whereas paranoia demonstrates a lack of range of alternative statements leading secondarily to a lack of testability. This reflects the importance to both epistemology and psychiatry of epistemic standards in addition to testability, such as relevance to problems, and (...)
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  7.  11
    The Molecular Turn in Psychiatry: A Philosophical Analysis.Abraham Rudnick - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (3):287 – 296.
    Biological psychiatry has been dominated by a psychopharmacologically-driven neurotransmitter dysfunction paradigm. The objective of this paper is to explore a reductionist assumption underlying this paradigm, and to suggest an improvement on it. The methods used are conceptual analysis with a comparative approach, particularly using illustrations from the history of both biological psychiatry and molecular biology. The results are that complete reduction to physicochemical explanations is not fruitful, at least in the initial stages of research in the medical and life sciences, (...)
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  8.  20
    What is a Psychiatric Disability?Abraham Rudnick - 2013 - Health Care Analysis (2):1-9.
    This article aims to clarify the notion of a psychiatric disability. The article uses conceptual analysis, examining and applying established definitions of (general) disability to psychiatric disabilities. This analysis reveals that disability as inability to perform according to expectations or norms is related to impairment as deviation from the (statistical) norm, while disability as inability to achieve (personal) goals is related to impairment as deviation from the (personal) ideal. These two views of impairment and disability are distinct from the self-organization (...)
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  9.  8
    A Philosophical Analysis of the General Methodology of Qualitative Research: A Critical Rationalist Perspective. [REVIEW]Abraham Rudnick - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (3):1-10.
    Philosophical discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research, such as that used in some health research, has been inductivist or relativist to date, ignoring critical rationalism as a philosophical approach with which to discuss the general methodology of qualitative research. This paper presents a discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research from a critical rationalist perspective (inspired by Popper), using as an example mental health research. The widespread endorsement of induction in qualitative research is positivist and is suspect, (...)
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  10.  6
    Ethics Education for Psychiatry Residents.Kyoko Wada, Michele Doering & Abraham Rudnick - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (4):425-435.
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  11.  17
    Normal Variants of Competence to Consent to Treatment.Abraham Rudnick & David Roe - 2004 - HEC Forum 16 (2):129-137.
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  12.  11
    Towards a Rationalization of Biological Psychiatry: A Study in Psychobiological Epistemology.Abraham Rudnick - 1990 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (1):75-96.
    Contemporary biological psychiatry is in a seemingly inchoate state. I assert that this state of biological psychiatry is due to its violation of an epistemological criterion of rationality, i.e., the relevance criterion; that is, contemporary biological psychiatry is irrational as it adopts a conception irrelevant to the psychobiological domain. This conception is mechanistic. The irrationality of biological psychiatry is manifest as the dominance of neurochemical explanations of psychopharmacological correlations, resulting in predictive sterility and, correspondingly, in the dominance of serendipity. I (...)
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  13.  3
    The Risk-Related Approach to Assessment of Capacity to Consent to or Refuse Medical Treatment: A Critical Review.Kyoko Wada & Abraham RudnicK - 2009 - International Journal of Ethics 6 (4):351-362.
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  14.  4
    On the Notion of (Medical) Invasiveness.Abraham Rudnick - 2011 - Health Care Analysis 19 (2):99-106.
    The relation between the notions of (medical) invasiveness and (actual or potential) harm has not been systematically discussed nor theoretically grounded, despite its importance to clinical-ethical practice. This paper aims to clarify the notion of invasiveness beyond the traditional notion of invasiveness as breaking skin or inserting mechanical objects into the body. The traditional notion of invasiveness is challenged by counterexamples. Three approaches to the notion of disorder applied here are: deviation from what is common; deviation from what is considered (...)
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  15.  7
    Other-Consciousness and the Use of Animals as Illustrated in Medical Experiments.Abraham Rudnick - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):202–208.
  16. A Risk-Benefit Analysis.Abraham Rudnick - 2012 - In Recovery of People with Mental Illness: Philosophical and Related Perspectives. Oxford University Press. pp. 304.
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  17. Processes and Pitfalls of Dialogical Bioethics.Abraham Rudnick - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (2):123-135.
    Bioethics uses various theories, methods and institutions for its decision-making. Lately, a dialogical, i.e., dialogue-based, approach has been argued for in bioethics. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the decision-making processes that may be involved in this dialogical approach, as well as related pitfalls that may have to be addressed in order for this approach to be helpful, particularly in clinical ethics. Using informal logic, an analysis is presented of the notion of dialogue and of the (...)
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  18.  26
    Recovery of People with Mental Illness: Philosophical and Related Perspectives.Abraham Rudnick (ed.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    It is only in the past 20 years that the concept of 'recovery' from mental health has been more widely considered and researched. This book is unique in addressing philosophical issues - including conceptual challenges and opportunities - raised by the notion of recovery of people with mental illness.
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