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Abram Brummett [15]Abram L. Brummett [6]
  1.  17
    Taxonomizing Views of Clinical Ethics Expertise.Erica K. Salter & Abram Brummett - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):50-61.
    Our aim in this article is to bring some clarity to the clinical ethics expertise debate by critiquing and replacing the taxonomy offered by the Core Competencies report. The orienting question for our taxonomy is: Can clinical ethicists offer justified, normative recommendations for active patient cases? Views that answer “no” are characterized as a “negative” view of clinical ethics expertise and are further differentiated based on why they think ethicists cannot give justified normative recommendations and what they think ethicists can (...)
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  2.  23
    Whose Harm? Which Metaphysic?Abram Brummett - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (1):43-61.
    Douglas Diekema has argued that it is not the best interest standard, but the harm principle that serves as the moral basis for ethicists, clinicians, and the courts to trigger state intervention to limit parental authority in the clinic. Diekema claims the harm principle is especially effective in justifying state intervention in cases of religiously motivated medical neglect in pediatrics involving Jehovah’s Witnesses and Christian Scientists. I argue that Diekema has not articulated a harm principle that is capable of justifying (...)
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  3.  12
    Secular Clinical Ethicists Should Not Be Neutral Toward All Religious Beliefs: An Argument for a Moral-Metaphysical Proceduralism.Abram L. Brummett - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (6):5-16.
    Secular clinical ethics has responded to the problem of moral pluralism with a procedural approach. However, defining this term stirs debate: H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr. has championed a contentless proceduralism, while others, conversely, argue for a proceduralism that permits some content in the form of moral claims. This paper argues that the content P2 permits ought to be expanded to include some metaphysical commitments, in an approach referred to as P2+. The need for P2+ is demonstrated by analyzing and rejecting (...)
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  4.  7
    Two Troubling Trends in the Conversation Over Whether Clinical Ethics Consultants Have Ethics Expertise.Abram Brummett & Christopher J. Ostertag - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (2):157-169.
    In a recent issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, several scholars wrote on the topic of ethics expertise in clinical ethics consultation. The articles in this issue exemplified what we consider to be two troubling trends in the quest to articulate a unique expertise for clinical ethicists. The first trend, exemplified in the work of Lisa Rasmussen, is an attempt to define a role for clinical ethicists that denies they have ethics expertise. Rasmussen cites the dependence of ethical (...)
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  5.  10
    The Quasi-Religious Nature of Clinical Ethics Consultation.Abram Brummett - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (3):199-209.
    What is the proper role of a clinical ethics consultant’s religious beliefs in forming recommendations for clinical ethics consultation? Where Janet Malek has argued that religious belief should have no influence on the formation of a CEC’s recommendations, Clint Parker has argued a CEC should freely appeal to all their background beliefs, including religious beliefs, in formulating their recommendations. In this paper, I critique both their views by arguing the position envisioned by Malek puts the CEC too far from religion (...)
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  6.  10
    Reaching Across The ‘Deepest Divide’: Moral Acquaintanceship, Religion, And Bioethics.Abram Brummett - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (4):677-688.
  7.  14
    When Conscientious Objection Runs Amok: A Physician Refusing HIV Preventative to a Bisexual Patient.Abram Brummett - forthcoming - Sage Publications: Clinical Ethics.
    Clinical Ethics, Ahead of Print. This paper reports of a case where a physician conscientiously objected to prescribing PrEP to a bisexual patient so as not to “enable immoral sexual behavior.” The case represents an instance of conscience creep, a phenomenon whereby clinicians invoke conscientious objection in sometimes objectionable ways that extend beyond the traditional contexts of abortion, sterilization, or physician aid in dying. This essay uses a reasonability view of conscientious objection to argue that the above case represents a (...)
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  8.  3
    Putting the Asymmetry Debate in Its Place.Abram L. Brummett - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):68-69.
    The target article by Kyle Fritz draws attention to the asymmetry debate, an under-analyzed issue within the broader debate over the proper role of physician conscience in healthcare. The as...
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  9.  7
    Neuroethics and the Naturalistic Fallacy.Abram L. Brummett - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):124-126.
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  10.  3
    Credentialing Ethics Expertise.Abram L. Brummett - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (3):50-52.
    Volume 20, Issue 3, March 2020, Page 50-52.
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  11.  9
    Conscience Claims, Metaphysics, and Avoiding an LGBT Eugenic.Abram Brummett - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):272-280.
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  12.  4
    Affirming the Existence and Legitimacy of Secular Bioethical Consensus, and Rejecting Engelhardt’s Alternative: A Reply to Nick Colgrove and Kelly Kate Evans.Abram Brummett - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-15.
    One of the most significant and persistent debates in secular clinical ethics is the question of ethics expertise, which asks whether ethicists can make justified moral recommendations in active patient cases. A critical point of contention in the ethics expertise debate is whether there is, in fact, a bioethical consensus upon which secular ethicists can ground their recommendations and whether there is, in principle, a way of justifying such a consensus in a morally pluralistic context. In a series of recent (...)
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  13.  5
    Dementia, Beauty, and Play: A Way of Seeing and Being with the Wearisome Patient.Abram Brummett & Michelle Bach - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092097710.
    We describe a case of an elderly patient suffering from advanced dementia whose chronic confusion has become a source of frustration for her caregivers. Mrs. M experiences a touching interaction with a new nurse who takes a different approach with her. We describe this interaction and elaborate upon it by drawing from Catholic social teaching and the philosophy of play. Cases like these do not involve dramatic or esoteric ethical problematics, but rather the sort of dilemma born of the everyday (...)
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  14.  2
    Defending, Improving, Expanding, and Applying a Moral-Metaphysical Proceduralism for Secular Clinical Ethics.Abram L. Brummett - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7):6-9.
    A paradox has always lingered at the heart of secular clinical ethics: How are ethicists to provide moral guidance in a pluralistic society? I want to thank all the commentary authors for being suc...
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  15.  5
    Public Health Approaches and the Human Enhancement Debate.Abram Brummett - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (4):536-546.
    Cognitive enhancement refers to any technology that raises some aspect of cognition beyond the species-typical level. It is often considered distinct from and less controversial than cognitive therapy, which raises the cognition of a deficient individual to the species-typical level. The debate over CE is a result of the excitement surrounding the potential of neuroscience to one day enable us to enhance our own cognition in significant ways. Some of the aspects of cognition targeted by enhancement and therapeutic technologies include (...)
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  16.  2
    Phenomenology, Saudi Arabia, and an Argument for the Standardization of Clinical Ethics Consultation.Abram Brummett & Ruaim Muaygil - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-9.
    Background The purpose of this study is to make a philosophical argument against the phenomenological critique of standardization in clinical ethics. We used the context of clinical ethics in Saudi Arabia to demonstrate the importance of credentialing clinical ethicists. Methods Philosophical methods of argumentation and conceptual analysis were used. Results We found the phenomenological critique of standardization to be flawed because it relies on a series of false dichotomies. Conclusions We concluded that the phenomenological framing of the credentialing debate relies (...)
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  17.  10
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries “Taxonomizing Views of Clinical Ethics Expertise”.Abram Brummett & Erica Salter - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (1):W5-W8.
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  18.  57
    Two Internal Critiques for Theists Who Oppose Moral Enhancement on a Process Virtue Basis.Abram Brummett & Parker Crutchfield - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Some bioconservatives reject the use of biotechnology for moral enhancement while simultaneously purporting to accept standard theism and process virtue (STPV). Standard theism holds that God is a personal, omniscient, omnibenevolent, omnipotent, transcendent being. Process virtue holds that intrinsically valuable virtue can only be obtained through a specific process and not by means of biotechnological shortcuts. We describe two internal critiques, one conceptual and the other moral, that arise by combining standard theism and process virtue to reject moral enhancement. First, (...)
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  19.  14
    The Prisoner Dilemma: Inconsistent Decisions for Continuing Life-Sustaining Treatment Between a Patient with Very Limited Communication and Their Surrogate.Abram Brummett - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (1):46-48.
    This case raises the difficult question of how to respond to patients who appear to lack decision-making capacity, yet retain limited communication that allows them to state a preference for life-sustaining treatment that conflicts with the choice of their surrogate. I argue that the patient’s preference should be honored, even though the patient lacks decision-making capacity, and the preference contradicts the wishes of the surrogate.
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  20.  2
    What is the Appropriate Role of Reason in Secular Clinical Ethics? An Argument for a Compatibilist View of Public Reason.Abram Brummett - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (2):281-290.
    This article describes and rejects three standard views of reason in secular clinical ethics. The first, instrumental reason view, affirms that reason may be used to draw conceptual distinctions, map moral geography, and identify invalid forms of argumentation, but prohibits recommendations because reason cannot justify any content-full moral or metaphysical commitments. The second, public reason view, affirms instrumental reason, and claims ethicists may make recommendations grounded in the moral and metaphysical commitments of bioethical consensus. The third, comprehensive reason view, also (...)
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  21.  7
    Three Kinds of Decision-Making Capacity for Refusing Medical Interventions.Mark Christopher Navin, Abram L. Brummett & Jason Adam Wasserman - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-11.
    According to a standard account of patient decision-making capacity, patients can provide ethically valid consent or refusal only if they are able to understand and appreciate their medical c...
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