Results for 'Abstract Objects'

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  1. Abstract Objects and the Semantics of Natural Language.Friederike Moltmann - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    This book pursues the question of how and whether natural language allows for reference to abstract objects in a fully systematic way. By making full use of contemporary linguistic semantics, it presents a much greater range of linguistic generalizations than has previously been taken into consideration in philosophical discussions, and it argues for an ontological picture is very different from that generally taken for granted by philosophers and semanticists alike. Reference to abstract objects such as properties, (...)
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  2. Awareness of Abstract Objects.Elijah Chudnoff - 2013 - Noûs 47 (4):706-726.
    Awareness is a two-place determinable relation some determinates of which are seeing, hearing, etc. Abstract objects are items such as universals and functions, which contrast with concrete objects such as solids and liquids. It is uncontroversial that we are sometimes aware of concrete objects. In this paper I explore the more controversial topic of awareness of abstract objects. I distinguish two questions. First, the Existence Question: are there any experiences that make their subjects aware (...)
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    Can Emotions Have Abstract Objects? The Example of Awe.Fredericks Rachel - forthcoming - Philosophia.
    Can we feel emotions about abstract objects, assuming that abstract objects exist? I argue that at least some emotions can have abstract objects as their intentional objects and discuss why this conclusion is not just trivially true. Through critical engagement with the work of Dacher Keltner and Jonathan Haidt, I devote special attention to awe, an emotion that is particularly well suited to show that some emotions can be about either concrete or (...) objects. In responding to a possible objection, according to which we can only feel emotions about things that we take to matter to our flourishing, and thus cannot feel emotions about causally inefficacious abstract objects, I explore how abstract objects can be relevant to human flourishing and discuss someemotions other than awe that can be about abstract objects. I finish by explaining somereasons why my conclusion matters, including the fact that it presents a challenge to perceptual theories of emotion and causal theories of intentionality. (shrink)
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  4. The Existence (and Non-Existence) of Abstract Objects.Richard Heck - 2011 - In Frege's Theorem. Oxford University Press.
    This paper is concerned with neo-Fregean accounts of reference to abstract objects. It develops an objection to the most familiar such accounts, due to Bob Hale and Crispin Wright, based upon what I call the 'proliferation problem': Hale and Wright's account makes reference to abstract objects seem too easy, as is shown by the fact that any equivalence relation seems as good as any other. The paper then develops a response to this objection, and offers an (...)
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  5. Intuition, Presentational Phenomenology, and Awareness of Abstract Objects.Elijah Chudnoff - forthcoming - Florida Philosophical Review.
    Intuition has three parts. The first part is about the nature of intuition experiences. I claim that they are like perceptual experiences in possessing presentational phenomenology. Richard Manning challenges how I support this claim. The second part is about the nature of intuitive justification. There I argue for a form of phenomenal dogmatism about intuition: having an intuition as of p prima facie immediately justifies you in believing that p and does so because of its phenomenology. On my view the (...)
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  6. Natural Numbers and Natural Cardinals as Abstract Objects: A Partial Reconstruction of Frege's Grundgesetze in Object Theory.Edward N. Zalta - 1999 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (6):619-660.
    In this paper, the author derives the Dedekind-Peano axioms for number theory from a consistent and general metaphysical theory of abstract objects. The derivation makes no appeal to primitive mathematical notions, implicit definitions, or a principle of infinity. The theorems proved constitute an important subset of the numbered propositions found in Frege's Grundgesetze. The proofs of the theorems reconstruct Frege's derivations, with the exception of the claim that every number has a successor, which is derived from a modal (...)
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  7.  20
    A Generic Russellian Elimination of Abstract Objects.Kevin C. Klement - 2015 - Philosophia Mathematica:nkv031.
    In this paper I explore a position on which it is possible to eliminate the need for postulating abstract objects through abstraction principles by treating terms for abstracta as ‘incomplete symbols’, using Russell's no-classes theory as a template from which to generalize. I defend views of this stripe against objections, most notably Richard Heck's charge that syntactic forms of nominalism cannot correctly deal with non-first-orderizable quantifcation over apparent abstracta. I further discuss how number theory may be developed in (...)
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    Abstract Objects and Causation: Bringing Causation Back Into Contemporary Platonism.Charles Taliaferro - 2015 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 71 (4):769-780.
    Resumo O autor defenderá, por um lado, a existência dos objectos abstractos e, por outro, o seu papel causal, numa ontologia platónica, tal como enquadrada por Roderick Chisholm. Se plausível, a natureza e o papel dos abstracta sob a forma de estados de coisas, oferecem-nos razões para acreditar em uma descrição bem-sucedida e explicativa da intencionalidade humana e animal que não está encerrada no mundo físico. Palavras-chave : causalidade, encerramento causal, fisicalismo, objectos abstractos, platonismo, Roderick ChisholmA defense of the existence (...)
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  9.  42
    Can God Create Abstract Objects? A Reply to Peter van Inwagen.Paul Gould - 2014 - Sophia 53 (1):99-112.
    The Platonic theist Peter van Inwagen argues that God cannot create abstract objects. Thus, the quantifier ‘everything’ in traditional statements of the doctrine of creation should be appropriately restricted to things that can enter into causal relations and abstract objects cannot: ‘God is the creator of everything distinct from himself…that can enter into causal relations.’ I respond to van Inwagen arguing that he has provided no good reason for thinking abstract objects must be uncreated. (...)
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    Approaching the Abstract: Building Blocks for an Epistemology of Abstract Objects.Søren Harnow Klausen - 2013 - Semiotica 2013 (194):3-20.
    Abstract objects are widely held to pose a formidable epistemological challenge. It has seemed mysterious to many how we can have access to such strange and intangible entities. The article considers five influential ways to meet the challenge: Transcendental arguments, the indispensability argument, insisting that we just are able to grasp abstract objects and that no further explanation is needed, abstractionist accounts, and ontological reduction. None of these approaches is by itself sufficient or completely convincing, but (...)
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  11.  59
    Art & Abstract Objects.Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Art and Abstract Objects presents a lively philosophical exchange between the philosophy of art and the core areas of philosophy. The standard way of thinking about non-repeatable (single-instance) artworks such as paintings, drawings, and non-cast sculpture is that they are concrete (i.e., material, causally efficacious, located in space and time). Da Vinci's Mona Lisa is currently located in Paris. Richard Serra's Tilted Arc is 73 tonnes of solid steel. Johannes Vermeer's The Concert was stolen in 1990 and remains (...)
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  12.  46
    Abstract Objects? Who Cares!Graham Oppy (ed.) - 2014 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    This is my main contribution to P. Gould (ed.) Beyond the Control of God?: Six Views on the Problem of God and Abstract Objects Bloomsbury. (The other contibutors to this work are: Keith Yandell; Paul Gould and Rich Davis; Greg Welty; William Lane Craig; and Scott Shalkowski.) I argue that, when it comes to a comparative assessment of the merits of theism and atheism, it makes no difference whether one opts for realism or fictionalism concerning abstract (...). (shrink)
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  13.  82
    Time, Causation, and Abstract Objects.Martin Lin - manuscript
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  14.  4
    Review of Paul M. Gould, Ed., Beyond the Control of God?: Six Views on the Problem of God and Abstract Objects.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2016 - Journal of Analytic Theology 4 (1):434-439.
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  15. Reference to Abstract Objects in Discourse.Nicholas Asher - 1993 - Kluwer.
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  16.  14
    Arguments as Abstract Objects.Paul L. Simard Smith & Andrei Moldovan - 2011 - Informal Logic 31 (3):230-261.
    In recent discussions concerning the definition of argument, it has been maintained that the word ‘argument’ exhibits the process-product ambiguity, or an act/object ambigu-ity. Drawing on literature on lexical ambiguity we argue that ‘argument’ is not ambiguous. The term ‘argu-ment’ refers to an object, not to a speech act. We also examine some of the important implications of our argument by considering the question: what sort of abstract objects are arguments?
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  17. The Ontology of Concepts: Abstract Objects or Mental Representations?Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 2007 - Noûs 41 (4):561-593.
    What is a concept? Philosophers have given many different answers to this question, reflecting a wide variety of approaches to the study of mind and language. Nonetheless, at the most general level, there are two dominant frameworks in contemporary philosophy. One proposes that concepts are mental representations, while the other proposes that they are abstract objects. This paper looks at the differences between these two approaches, the prospects for combining them, and the issues that are involved in the (...)
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  18.  43
    Types and Tokens: On Abstract Objects.Linda Wetzel - 2009 - MIT Press.
    In this book, Linda Wetzel examines the distinction between types and tokens and argues that types exist (as abstract objects, since they lack a unique ...
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  19.  4
    Arguments as Abstract Objects.Paul Simard Smith, Andrei Moldovan & G. C. Goddu - unknown
    In recent discussions concerning the definition of argument, it has been maintained that the word ‘argument’ exhibits the process-product ambiguity, or an act/object ambi-guity. Drawing on literature on lexical ambiguity we argue that ‘argument’ is not ambiguous. The term ‘argument’ refers to an object, not to a speech act. We also examine some of the important implications of our argument by considering the question: what sort of abstract objects are arguments?
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  20.  5
    Can Emotions Have Abstract Objects? The Example of Awe.Fredericks Rachel - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-14.
    Can we feel emotions about abstract objects, assuming that abstract objects exist? I argue that at least some emotions can have abstract objects as their intentional objects and discuss why this conclusion is not just trivially true. Through critical engagement with the work of Dacher Keltner and Jonathan Haidt, I devote special attention to awe, an emotion that is particularly well suited to show that some emotions can be about either concrete or (...) objects. In responding to a possible objection, according to which we can only feel emotions about things that we take to matter to our flourishing, and thus cannot feel emotions about causally inefficacious abstract objects, I explore how abstract objects can be relevant to human flourishing and discuss some emotions other than awe that can be about abstract objects. I finish by explaining some reasons why my conclusion matters, including the fact that it presents a challenge to perceptual theories of emotion and causal theories of intentionality. (shrink)
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  21.  33
    Fictional Characters as Abstract Objects: Some Questions.Reina Hayaki - 2009 - American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):141 - 149.
    Sir Arthur Conan doyle wrote fifty-six short stories and four novels about Sherlock Holmes, collectively known as the Canon. The following are all true facts about the Canon: It is true according to the Canon that Sherlock Holmes is a detective. It is true according to the Canon that Queen Victoria hired a private consulting detective, gave him an emerald tiepin, and offered him a knighthood which he refused. The Canon is about Sherlock Holmes. The Canon is about a brilliant (...)
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  22.  42
    Deriving and Validating Kripkean Claims Using the Theory of Abstract Objects.Edward N. Zalta - 2006 - Noûs 40 (4):591–622.
    In this paper, the author shows how one can independently prove, within the theory of abstract objects, some of the most significant claims, hypotheses, and background assumptions found in Kripke's logical and philosophical work. Moreover, many of the semantic features of theory of abstract objects are consistent with Kripke's views — the successful representation, in the system, of the truth conditions and entailments of philosophically puzzling sentences of natural language validates certain Kripkean semantic claims about natural (...)
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  23.  51
    Knowledge, Cause, and Abstract Objects: Causal Objections to Platonism.Michael Liston - 2004 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (2):356 – 359.
    Book Information Knowledge, Cause, and Abstract Objects: Causal Objections to Platonism. Knowledge, Cause, and Abstract Objects: Causal Objections to Platonism Colin Cheyne , Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2001 , xvi + 236 , £55 ( cloth ) By Colin Cheyne. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pp. xvi + 236. £55.
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  24.  24
    Husserl and the Problem of Abstract Objects.George Duke & Peter Woelert - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):27-47.
    One major difficulty confronting attempts to clarify the epistemological and ontological status of abstract objects is determining the sense, if any, in which such entities may be characterised as mind and language independent. Our contention is that the tolerant reductionist position of Michael Dummett can be strengthened by drawing on Husserl's mature account of the constitution of ideal objects and mathematical objectivity. According to the Husserlian position we advocate, abstract singular terms pick out weakly mind-independent sedimented (...)
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  25.  33
    Dummett and the Problem of Abstract Objects.George Duke - 2013 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):61-75.
    One major difficulty confronting attempts to clarify the epistemological and ontological status of abstract objects is determining the sense, if any, in which such entities may be characterised as mind and language independent. Our contention is that the tolerant reductionist position of Michael Dummett can be strengthened by drawing on Husserl's mature account of the constitution of ideal objects and mathematical objectivity. According to the Husserlian position we advocate, abstract singular terms pick out weakly mind-independent sedimented (...)
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  26.  32
    Review of G. Duke: Dummett on Abstract Objects[REVIEW]Bob Hale - 2013 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 2 (2).
    Review of G. Duke: Dummett onObjects References G. Frege. Über Sinn und Bedeutung. Zeitschrift für Philosophie und philosophische Kritik, 100, 25–50, 1892. Translated in G.Frege, Collected Papers on Mathematics, Logic and Philosophy, edited by B. McGuinness. Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 157–77. G. Frege. Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik. Breslau, Verlag von W. Koebner, 1884. Translated by J.L. Austin as The Foundations of Arithmetic, Oxford, Basil Blackwell, second revised edition 1953. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy of Language. London, Duckworth, 1973. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy (...)
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  27.  51
    Theories of Abstract Objects Without Ad Hoc Restriction.Wen-Fang Wang - 2011 - Erkenntnis 74 (1):1-15.
    The ideas of fixed points (Kripke in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 53–81, 1975; Martin and Woodruff in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 47–51, 1984) and revision sequences (Gupta and Belnap in The revision theory of truth. MIT, London, 1993; Gupta in The Blackwell guide to philosophical logic. Blackwell, London, pp 90–114, 2001) have been exploited to provide solutions to the semantic paradox and have achieved admirable (...)
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  28.  2
    Language and Other Abstract Objects &Lsqb1981&Rsqb: The Metaphysics Of Linguistics. [REVIEW]Mark Mcevoy - 2002 - Philosophical Forum 34 (3-4):427-438.
    Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and OtherObjects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language (...)
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  29.  13
    Are Arguments Abstract Objects?Steven W. Patterson - unknown
    Geoff Goddu's 2010 paper "Is 'Argument' subject to the process/product ambiguity?" and Paul Simard-Smith and Andrei Moldovan's 2011 paper “Arguments as abstract objects” have revived the dialogue about what might be called the "metaphysics of argument". Both papers are important. Both also seem to me to be open to significant objections. In this paper I will lay out some of these objections and give, in rough outline, the kernel of an alternative approach.
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  30.  46
    On Tichy's Determiners and Zalta's Abstract Objects.A. Sierszulska - 2006 - Axiomathes 16 (4):486-498.
    It is not a common practice to postulate meaning entities treated as objects of some kind. The paper demonstrates two ways of introducing meaning-objects in two logics of natural language, Tichy’s Transparent Intensional Logic and Zalta’s Intensional Logic of Abstract Objects. Tichy’s theory belongs to the Fregean line of thinking, with what he calls ‘constructions’ as Fregean senses, and ‘determiners’ as object-like meaning entities constructed by the senses. Zalta’s theory belongs to Meinongian logics and he postulates (...)
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  31.  1
    How Abstract Objects Strike Us.Michael Liston - 1994 - Dialectica 48 (1):3-27.
    SummaryBenacerraf challenges us to account for the reliability of our mathematical beliefs given that there appear to be no natural connections between mathematical believers and mathematical ontology. In this paper I try to do two things. I argue that the interactionist view underlying this challenge renders inexplicable not only the reliability of our mathematical beliefs, construed either platonistically or naturalistically , but also the reliability of most of our beliefs in physics. I attempt to counter Benacerraf's challenge by sketching an (...)
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  32.  5
    Could Abstract Objects Depend Upon God?: SCOTT A. DAVISON.Scott A. Davison - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (4):485-497.
    What sorts of things are there in the world? Clearly enough, there are concrete, material things; but are there other things too, perhaps nonconcrete or non-material things? Some people believe that there are such things, which are often called abstract ; purported examples of such objects include numbers, properties, possible but non-actual states of affairs, propositions, and sets. Following a long-standing tradition, I shall describe persons who believe that there are abstract objects as ‘platonists’. In this (...)
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  33.  19
    Language and Other Abstract Objects [1981]: The Metaphysics of Linguistics.Mark McEvoy - 2003 - Philosophical Forum 34 (3-4):427–438.
    Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and OtherObjects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language and Other Abstract Objects;Book reviewed:;Jerrold J. Katz, Language (...)
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  34.  2
    God with or Without Abstract Objects.S. A. Shalkowski - unknown
    In this contribution, I defend two claims. First, theological problems do not arise, because there are insufficient grounds for thinking that there are abstract objects. Second, theological problems do not arise because even if abstract objects do exist as platonists think they do, they pose no problem for God’s sovereignty or aseity. The argument for the second has two components. First, there are limits and then there are limits. The so-called limits platonism would place upon God (...)
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  35.  23
    Dummett on Abstract Objects.George Duke - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book offers an historically-informed critical assessment of Dummett's account of abstract objects, examining in detail some of the Fregean presuppositions whilst also engaging with recent work on the problem of abstract entities.
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  36. Individuating Abstract Objects: The Methodologies of Frege and Quine.Dirk Greimann - 2001 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 4.
    According to Frege, the introduction of a new sort of abstract object is methodologically sound only if its identity conditions have been satisfactorily explained. Ironically, this ontological restriction has come to be known by Quine's criticism of Frege's intensional semantics, as the precept "No entity without identity." The aim of the paper is to reconstruct Frege's methodology of the introduction of abstract objects in detail, and to defend it against the more restrictive methodology underlying Quine's criticism of (...)
     
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  37. Natural Numbers and Natural Cardinals as Abstract Objects: A Partial Reconstruction of Frege's Grundgesetze in Object Theory.Edward N. Zalta - 1999 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (6):619-660.
    In this paper, the author derives the Dedekind-Peano axioms for number theory from a consistent and general metaphysical theory of abstract objects. The derivation makes no appeal to primitive mathematical notions, implicit definitions, or a principle of infinity. The theorems proved constitute an important subset of the numbered propositions found in Frege's *Grundgesetze*. The proofs of the theorems reconstruct Frege's derivations, with the exception of the claim that every number has a successor, which is derived from a modal (...)
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  38.  15
    Knowledge of Abstract Objects in Physics and Mathematics.J. Shaffer Michael - forthcoming - Acta Analytica:1-13.
  39.  52
    Abstract Objects.Bob Hale - 1988 - Blackwell.
  40.  9
    Computing with Numbers and Other Non-Syntactic Things: De Re Knowledge of Abstract Objects.Stewart Shapiro - forthcoming - Philosophia Mathematica:nkx009.
    ABSTRACT Michael Rescorla has argued that it makes sense to compute directly with numbers, and he faulted Turing for not giving an analysis of number-theoretic computability. However, in line with a later paper of his, it only makes sense to compute directly with syntactic entities, such as strings on a given alphabet. Computing with numbers goes via notation. This raises broader issues involving de re propositional attitudes towards numbers and other non-syntactic abstract entities.
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  41. Abstract Objects: An Introduction to Axiomatic Metaphysics.Edward N. Zalta - 1983 - D. Reidel.
    . THEORY, DATA, AND EXPLANATION In this book, we shall produce a research program in metaphysics. Following Lakatos, a research program in metaphysics ...
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  42.  15
    Language and Other Abstract Objects.Jerrold J. Katz - 1980 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  43. There Are No Abstract Objects.Cian Dorr - 2008 - In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell.
    I explicate and defend the claim that, fundamentally speaking, there are no numbers, sets, properties or relations. The clarification consists in some remarks on the relevant sense of ‘fundamentally speaking’ and the contrasting sense of ‘superficially speaking’. The defence consists in an attempt to rebut two arguments for the existence of such entities. The first is a version of the indispensability argument, which purports to show that certain mathematical entities are required for good scientific explanations. The second is a speculative (...)
     
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  44.  36
    Abstract Objects and the Semantics of Natural Language, by Friederike Moltmann. [REVIEW]Jonathan Payne - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):209-209.
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  45. Abstract Objects.Gideon Rosen - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  46. How to Russell Another Meinongian: A Russellian Theory of Fictional Objects Versus Zalta's Theory of Abstract Objects.Gregory Landini - 1990 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 37:93-122.
    This article compares the theory of Meinongian objects proposed by Edward Zalta with a theory of fiction formulated within an early Russellian framework. The Russellian framework is the second-order intensional logic proposed by Nino B. Cocchiarelly as a reconstruction of the form of Logicism Russell was examining shortly after writing The Principles of Mathematics. A Russellian theory of denoting concepts is developed in this intensional logic and applied as a theory of the "objects' of fiction. The framework retains (...)
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  47.  15
    Abstract Objects: A Case Study.Stephen Yablo - 2002 - Philosophical Issues 12 (1):220-240.
  48. Abstract Objects: A Case Study.Stephen Yablo - 2002 - Noûs 36 (s1):220 - 240.
  49. The Epistemology of Abstract Objects: Access and Inference.David Bell & W. D. Hart - 1979 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 53:153-165.
  50. The Metaphysics of Abstract Objects.E. J. Lowe - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (10):509-524.
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