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  1.  32
    Capacity Building of Ethics Review Committees Across Africa Based on the Results of a Comprehensive Needs Assessment Survey.Aceme Nyika, Wenceslaus Kilama, Godfrey B. Tangwa, Roma Chilengi & Paulina Tindana - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):149-156.
    A needs assessment survey of ethics review committees (ERCs) across Africa was conducted in order to establish their major needs and areas of weaknesses in terms of ethical review capacity. The response rate was 84% (31 of 37 targeted committees), and committees surveyed were located in 18 African countries. The majority of the responding committees (61%) have been in existence between 5 and 10 years; approximately 74% of the respondents were institutional committees, with the remainder being either national (6/31) or (...)
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  2.  36
    Ethics in Occupational Health: Deliberations of an International Workgroup Addressing Challenges in an African Context.Leslie London, Godfrey Tangwa, Reginald Matchaba-Hove, Nhlanhla Mkhize, Remi Nwabueze, Aceme Nyika & Peter Westerholm - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundInternational codes of ethics play an important role in guiding professional practice in developing countries. In the occupational health setting, codes developed by international agencies have substantial import on protecting working populations from harm. This is particularly so under globalisation which has transformed processes of production in fundamental ways across the globe. As part of the process of revising the Ethical Code of the International Commission on Occupational Health, an Africa Working Group addressed key challenges for the relevance and cogency (...)
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  3.  19
    Ethics in Occupational Health: Deliberations of an International Workgroup Addressing Challenges in an African Context.Leslie London, Godfrey Tangwa, Reginald Matchaba-Hove, Nhlanhla Mkhize, Reginald Nwabueze, Aceme Nyika & Peter Westerholm - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):48.
    International codes of ethics play an important role in guiding professional practice in developing countries. In the occupational health setting, codes developing by international agencies have substantial import on protecting working populations from harm. This is particularly so under globalisation which has transformed processes of production in fundamental ways across the globe. As part of the process of revising the Ethical Code of the International Commission on Occupational Health, an African Working Group addressed key challenges for the relevance and cogency (...)
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  4.  33
    Ethical and Regulatory Issues Surrounding African Traditional Medicine in the Context of Hiv/Aids.Aceme Nyika - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 7 (1):25–34.
    ABSTRACTIt has been estimated that more than 80% of people in Africa use traditional medicine . With the HIV/AIDS epidemic claiming many lives in Africa, the majority of people affected rely on TM mainly because it is relatively affordable and available to the poor populations who cannot afford orthodox medicine. Whereas orthodox medicine is practiced under stringent regulations and ethical guidelines emanating from The Nuremburg Code,1 African TM seems to be exempt from such scrutiny. Although recently there have been calls (...)
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  5.  8
    The Effect of Relationships on Decision-Making Processes of Women in Harare, Zimbabwe.Nicole Mamotte, Douglas Richard Wassenaar & Aceme Nyika - 2009 - Ethics and Behavior 19 (3):184-200.
    A preliminary study aimed at investigating the potential impact of relationships on decision-making process and autonomy of women was conducted in Harare, Zimbabwe. The majority of women surveyed (87.6%) were prepared to consult their husbands, whereas only 46.6% said they would consult their relatives prior to participation in health research. Only 6.2% and 11.3% were prepared to keep their participation secret from their husbands their relatives, respectively. Overall, 58.6% were rated as autonomous, 22.5% partially autonomous, and 18.9% were rated as (...)
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