Results for 'Adam D. Farmer'

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  1. International Consensus Based Review and Recommendations for Minimum Reporting Standards in Research on Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation.Adam D. Farmer, Adam Strzelczyk, Alessandra Finisguerra, Alexander V. Gourine, Alireza Gharabaghi, Alkomiet Hasan, Andreas M. Burger, Andrés M. Jaramillo, Ann Mertens, Arshad Majid, Bart Verkuil, Bashar W. Badran, Carlos Ventura-Bort, Charly Gaul, Christian Beste, Christopher M. Warren, Daniel S. Quintana, Dorothea Hämmerer, Elena Freri, Eleni Frangos, Eleonora Tobaldini, Eugenijus Kaniusas, Felix Rosenow, Fioravante Capone, Fivos Panetsos, Gareth L. Ackland, Gaurav Kaithwas, Georgia H. O'Leary, Hannah Genheimer, Heidi I. L. Jacobs, Ilse Van Diest, Jean Schoenen, Jessica Redgrave, Jiliang Fang, Jim Deuchars, Jozsef C. Széles, Julian F. Thayer, Kaushik More, Kristl Vonck, Laura Steenbergen, Lauro C. Vianna, Lisa M. McTeague, Mareike Ludwig, Maria G. Veldhuizen, Marijke De Couck, Marina Casazza, Marius Keute, Marom Bikson, Marta Andreatta, Martina D'Agostini, Mathias Weymar, Matthew Betts, Matthias Prigge, Michael Kaess, Michael Roden, Michelle Thai, Nathaniel M. Schuster & Nico Montano - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    Given its non-invasive nature, there is increasing interest in the use of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation across basic, translational and clinical research. Contemporaneously, tVNS can be achieved by stimulating either the auricular branch or the cervical bundle of the vagus nerve, referred to as transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation and transcutaneous cervical VNS, respectively. In order to advance the field in a systematic manner, studies using these technologies need to adequately report sufficient methodological detail to enable comparison of results between (...)
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  2.  31
    International Consensus Based Review and Recommendations for Minimum Reporting Standards in Research on Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation.Adam D. Farmer, Adam Strzelczyk, Alessandra Finisguerra, Alexander V. Gourine, Alireza Gharabaghi, Alkomiet Hasan, Andreas M. Burger, Andrés M. Jaramillo, Ann Mertens, Arshad Majid, Bart Verkuil, Bashar W. Badran, Carlos Ventura-Bort, Charly Gaul, Christian Beste, Christopher M. Warren, Daniel S. Quintana, Dorothea Hämmerer, Elena Freri, Eleni Frangos, Eleonora Tobaldini, Eugenijus Kaniusas, Felix Rosenow, Fioravante Capone, Fivos Panetsos, Gareth L. Ackland, Gaurav Kaithwas, Georgia H. O'Leary, Hannah Genheimer, Heidi I. L. Jacobs, Ilse Van Diest, Jean Schoenen, Jessica Redgrave, Jiliang Fang, Jim Deuchars, Jozsef C. Széles, Julian F. Thayer, Kaushik More, Kristl Vonck, Laura Steenbergen, Lauro C. Vianna, Lisa M. McTeague, Mareike Ludwig, Maria G. Veldhuizen, Marijke De Couck, Marina Casazza, Marius Keute, Marom Bikson, Marta Andreatta, Martina D'Agostini, Mathias Weymar, Matthew Betts, Matthias Prigge, Michael Kaess, Michael Roden, Michelle Thai, Nathaniel M. Schuster & Nico Montano - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    Given its non-invasive nature, there is increasing interest in the use of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation across basic, translational and clinical research. Contemporaneously, tVNS can be achieved by stimulating either the auricular branch or the cervical bundle of the vagus nerve, referred to as transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation and transcutaneous cervical VNS, respectively. In order to advance the field in a systematic manner, studies using these technologies need to adequately report sufficient methodological detail to enable comparison of results between (...)
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  3. Artificial Intelligence: Arguments for Catastrophic Risk.Adam Bales, William D'Alessandro & Cameron Domenico Kirk-Giannini - 2024 - Philosophy Compass 19 (2):e12964.
    Recent progress in artificial intelligence (AI) has drawn attention to the technology’s transformative potential, including what some see as its prospects for causing large-scale harm. We review two influential arguments purporting to show how AI could pose catastrophic risks. The first argument — the Problem of Power-Seeking — claims that, under certain assumptions, advanced AI systems are likely to engage in dangerous power-seeking behavior in pursuit of their goals. We review reasons for thinking that AI systems might seek power, that (...)
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  4.  24
    Privacy Rights: Moral and Legal Foundations.Adam D. Moore - 2010 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    We all know that Google stores huge amounts of information about everyone who uses its search tools, that Amazon can recommend new books to us based on our past purchases, and that the U.S. government engaged in many data-mining activities during the Bush administration to acquire information about us, including involving telecommunications companies in monitoring our phone calls. Control over access to our bodies and to special places, like our homes, has traditionally been the focus of concerns about privacy, but (...)
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  5. Owning Genetic information and Gene enhancement techniques: Why privacy and property rights may undermine social control of the human genome.Adam D. Moore - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (2):97–119.
    In this article I argue that the proper subjects of intangible property claims include medical records, genetic profiles, and gene enhancement techniques. Coupled with a right to privacy these intangible property rights allow individuals a zone of control that will, in most cases, justifiably exclude governmental or societal invasions into private domains. I argue that the threshold for overriding privacy rights and intangible property rights is higher, in relation to genetic enhancement techniques and sensitive personal information, than is commonly suggested. (...)
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  6. Privacy: Its Meaning and Value.Adam D. Moore - 2003 - American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (3):215 - 227.
    Bodily privacy, understood as a right to control access to one’s body, capacities, and powers, is one of our most cherished rights − a right enshrined in law and notions of common morality. Informational privacy, on the other hand, has yet to attain such a loftily status. As rational project pursuers, who operate and flourish in a world of material objects it is our ability control patterns of association and disassociation with our fellows that afford each of us the room (...)
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  7.  60
    Privacy Rights: Moral and Legal Foundations.Adam D. Moore - 2010 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "Provides a definition and defense of individual privacy rights. Applies the proposed theory to issues including privacy versus free speech; drug testing; and national security and public accountability"--Provided by publisher.
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  8.  21
    Owning Genetic Information and Gene Enhancement Techniques: Why Privacy and Property Rights May Undermine Social Control of the Human Genome.Adam D. Moore - 2002 - Bioethics 14 (2):97-119.
    In this article I argue that the proper subjects of intangible property claims include medical records, genetic profiles, and gene enhancement techniques. Coupled with a right to privacy these intangible property rights allow individuals a zone of control that will, in most cases, justifiably exclude governmental or societal invasions into private domains. I argue that the threshold for overriding privacy rights and intangible property rights is higher, in relation to genetic enhancement techniques and sensitive personal information, than is commonly suggested. (...)
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  9.  3
    Iterated Priority Arguments in Descriptive Set Theory.D. A. Y. Adam, Noam Greenberg, Matthew Alexander Harrison-Trainor & Daniel D. Turetsky - forthcoming - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic:1-23.
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  10.  46
    Employee Monitoring and Computer Technology.Adam D. Moore - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (3):697-709.
    In this article I address the tension between evaluative surveillance and privacy against the backdrop of the current explosion of information technology. More specifically, and after a brief analysis of privacy rights, I argue that knowledge of the different kinds ofsurveillance used at any given company should be made explicit to the employees. Moreover, there will be certain kinds of evaluativemonitoring that violate privacy rights and should not be used in most cases.
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  11.  86
    Intangible Property: Privacy, Power, and Information Control.Adam D. Moore - 1998 - American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):365 - 378.
  12. The Nonworseness Claim and the Moral Permissibility of Better-Than-Permissible Acts.Adam D. Bailey - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):237-250.
    Grounded in what Alan Wertheimer terms the nonworseness claim, it is thought by some philosophers that what will be referred to herein as better-than-permissible acts —acts that, if undertaken, would make another or others better off than they would be were an alternative but morally permissible act to be undertaken—are necessarily morally permissible. What, other than a bout of irrationality, it may be thought, would lead one to hold that an act (such as outsourcing production to a sweatshop in a (...)
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  13.  64
    Employee Monitoring and Computer Technology.Adam D. Moore - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (3):697-709.
    In this article I address the tension between evaluative surveillance and privacy against the backdrop of the current explosion of information technology. More specifically, and after a brief analysis of privacy rights, I argue that knowledge of the different kinds ofsurveillance used at any given company should be made explicit to the employees. Moreover, there will be certain kinds of evaluativemonitoring that violate privacy rights and should not be used in most cases.
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  14.  58
    Values, objectivity, and relationalism.Adam D. Moore - 2004 - Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (1):75-90.
  15.  38
    Privacy, Neuroscience, and Neuro-Surveillance.Adam D. Moore - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (2):159-177.
    The beliefs, feelings, and thoughts that make up our streams of consciousness would seem to be inherently private. Nevertheless, modern neuroscience is offering to open up the sanctity of this domain to outside viewing. A common retort often voiced to this worry is something like, ‘Privacy is difficult to define and has no inherent moral value. What’s so great about privacy?’ In this article I will argue against these sentiments. A definition of privacy is offered along with an account of (...)
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  16.  33
    Privacy, Security and Accountability: Ethics, Law and Policy.Adam D. Moore (ed.) - 2015 - New York: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This volume analyses the moral and legal foundations of privacy, security, and accountability along with the tensions that arise between these important individual and social values.
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  17.  36
    Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace.Adam D. Bailey - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-672.
    Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea of “Confucian community,” Confucian community should be viewed as a moral ideal. I (...)
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  18.  30
    Free speech, privacy, and autonomy.Adam D. Moore - 2020 - Social Philosophy and Policy 37 (2):31-51.
    While autonomy arguments provide a compelling foundation for free speech, they also support individual privacy rights. Considering how speech and privacy may be justified, I will argue that the speech necessary for self-government does not need to include details that would violate privacy rights. Additionally, I will argue that if viewed as a kind of intangible property right, informational privacy should limit speech and expression in a range of cases. In a world where we have an overabundance of content to (...)
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  19.  26
    Privacy, transparency, and the prisoner’s dilemma.Adam D. Moore & Sean Martin - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (3):211-222.
    Aside from making a few weak, and hopefully widely shared claims about the value of privacy, transparency, and accountability, we will offer an argument for the protection of privacy based on individual self-interest and prudence. In large part, this argument will parallel considerations that arise in a prisoner’s dilemma game. After briefly sketching an account of the value of privacy, transparency, and accountability, along with the salient features of a prisoner’s dilemma games, a game-theory analysis will be offered. In a (...)
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  20.  29
    Intellectual Property: Moral, Legal, and International Dilemmas.Adam D. Moore (ed.) - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    As the expansion of the Internet and the digital formatting of all kinds of creative works move us further into the information age, intellectual property issues have become paramount. Computer programs costing thousands of research dollars are now copied in an instant. People who would recoil at the thought of stealing cars, computers, or VCRs regularly steal software or copy their favorite music from a friend's CD. Since the Web has no national boundaries, these issues are international concerns. The contributors-philosophers, (...)
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  21.  47
    Privacy, Interests, and Inalienable Rights.Adam D. Moore - 2018 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 5 (2):327-355.
    Some rights are so important for human autonomy and well-being that many scholars insist they should not be waived, traded, or abandoned. Privacy is a recent addition to this list. At the other end of the spectrum is the belief that privacy is a mere unimportant interest or preference. This paper defends a middle path between viewing privacy as an inalienable, non-waivable, non-transferrable right and the view of privacy as a mere subjective interest. First, an account of privacy is offered (...)
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  22.  37
    The impact of perceived self-efficacy on mental time travel and social problem solving.Adam D. Brown, Michelle L. Dorfman, Charles R. Marmar & Richard A. Bryant - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):299-306.
    Current models of autobiographical memory suggest that self-identity guides autobiographical memory retrieval. Further, the capacity to recall the past and imagine one’s self in the future can influence social problem solving. We examined whether manipulating self-identity, through an induction task in which students were led to believe they possessed high or low self-efficacy, impacted episodic specificity and content of retrieved and imagined events, as well as social problem solving. Compared to individuals in the low self efficacy group, individuals in the (...)
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  23.  20
    Dangerous Work, Intention, and the Ethics of Hazard Pay.Adam D. Bailey - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (4):591-602.
    ABSTRACTIs offering hazard pay ethically permissible when the pay premium is the only reason that a dangerous job is accepted? Robert C. Hughes argues that it is not. Central to his argument is the claim that in such cases, workers intend the foreseeable risks of harm as a means to the pay premium. Herein I question the plausibility of this claim and then develop a conception of the concept of means sufficient to make it plausible. By so doing, I provide (...)
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  24.  3
    A Case for Freedom: Machiavellian Humanism.Adam D. Danél - 1996 - Upa.
    In this book, Adam D. Danél examines the philosophical and rhetorical foundations of Machiavelli's thought. There are few thinkers whose writings have intrigued more scholars and have been subjected to more diverse and conflicting interpretations, than Machiavelli. One may thus concur with Pitkin's comment that, "Machiavelli's thought is as problematic as politics itself, presenting a different face to each observer." Although many scholars have acknowledged Machiavelli's multifaceted work, only few have suggested—and none has explicated—its rationale. The search for the (...)
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  25.  26
    Privacy, Speech, and the Law.Adam D. Moore - 2013 - Journal of Information Ethics 22 (1):21-43.
  26. Dialogue: The Confucian Critique of Rights-Based Business Ethics.Adam D. Bailey & Alan Strudler - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-677.
    ABSTRACT:Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea of “Confucian community,” Confucian community should be viewed as a moral ideal. I (...)
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  27.  17
    The Principle of Double Effect, Permissiveness, and Intention.Adam D. Bailey - 2019 - International Philosophical Quarterly 59 (3):277-288.
    While some believe that the principle of double effect provides sound ethical guidance, others believe that it does not and have leveled various types of argument against it. One type of argument leveled against it proceeds by applying it to hypothetical “closeness” cases. This objection seeks to show that in such cases the principle permits what patently should not be permitted, and thus is unacceptable because it is too permissive. In this essay, I critically evaluate an argument of this type (...)
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  28.  26
    Privacy, speech, and values: what we have no business knowing.Adam D. Moore - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (1):41-49.
    In the United States the ascendancy of speech protection is due to an expansive and unjustified view of the value or primacy of free expression and access to information. This is perhaps understandable, given that privacy has been understood as a mere interest, whereas speech rights have been seen as more fundamental. I have argued elsewhere that the “mere interest” view of privacy is false. Privacy, properly defined, is a necessary condition for human well-being or flourishing. The opening section of (...)
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  29.  32
    Autonomy and the Ethical Status of Comprehensive Education.Adam D. Bailey - 2014 - Educational Theory 64 (4):393-408.
    On grounds of autonomy, is comprehensive education — an approach to education that attempts to facilitate the acceptance of certain beliefs and ways of life as being correct, and refuses to sympathetically expose students to contrary beliefs and ways of life — ethically suspect? Recently, Bryan R. Warnick has argued that it is. In this essay, Adam D. Bailey critically evaluates Warnick's argument, and contends that it is unsuccessful. In particular, he argues that Warnick's argument from necessity does not (...)
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  30.  68
    Privacy, public health, and controlling medical information.Adam D. Moore - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (3):225-240.
    This paper argues that individuals do, in a sense, own or have exclusive claims to control their personal information and body parts. It begins by sketching several arguments that support presumptive claims to informational privacy, turning then to consider cases which illustrate when and how privacy may be overridden by public health concerns.
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  31.  20
    Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide?Adam D. Moore - 2014 - Philosophical Review 123 (1):112-116.
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  32.  3
    Political ecologies: essays in ecological science and policy.Adam D. C. Cherson - 2010 - New York: Greencore Books.
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  33.  36
    Fundamental Interventions: How Clinicians Can Address the Fundamental Causes of Disease.Adam D. Reich, Helena B. Hansen & Bruce G. Link - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):185-192.
    In order to enhance the “structural competency” of medicine—the capability of clinicians to address social and institutional determinants of their patients’ health—physicians need a theoretical lens to see how social conditions influence health and how they might address them. We consider one such theoretical lens, fundamental cause theory, and propose how it might contribute to a more structurally competent medical profession. We first describe fundamental cause theory and how it makes the social causes of disease and health visible. We then (...)
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  34.  48
    Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science.Adam D. Roth, Anya Plutynski, Bridget Buxton, Steven C. Hatch, Sharyn Clough, Brian L. Keeley, Yuri Yamamoto, Lawrence Souder, Evelyn Brister, Kristen Intemann, Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Glen Sanford - 2011 - Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books.
    Compiled by an archaeologist and philosopher of science, Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science supplements current literature in the history and philosophy of science with essays approaching the traditional problems of the field from new perspectives and highlighting disciplines usually overlooked by the canon. William H. Krieger brings together scientists from a number of disciplines to answer these questions and more in a volume appropriate for both students and academics in the field.
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  35. A medievalist's journey through science and faith.Adam D. Jones - 2021 - In Mark J. Boone, Rose M. Cothren, Kevin C. Neece & Jaclyn S. Parrish (eds.), The Good, the True, the Beautiful: A Multidisciplinary Tribute to Dr. David K. Naugle. Pickwick.
     
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  36.  36
    “Publicity” and the progressive‐era origins of modern politics.Adam D. Sheingate - 2007 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 19 (2-3):461-480.
    The Rhetorical Presidency places great importance on the transformative power of political ideas. For Tulis, Progressive ideas informed the rhetorical practices of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson—practices that reconstituted the American presidency. They did so, in part, by trading on the ambiguous nature of the concept of “publicity”—which at once evoked liberal ideals of public deliberation and transparency, and modern practices of manipulative communication. In turn, the new practices of publicity revolutionized not only the American presidency, but American politics as (...)
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  37. A Dynamic Theory of Personality.K. Lewin, D. K. Adams & K. E. Zener - 1936 - Mind 45 (178):246-251.
  38.  13
    Memory Specificity Training for Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Promising Therapeutic Intervention.Mina N. Erten & Adam D. Brown - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  39.  11
    I Know I Should Not Be Biased, But How Do I Do That?Adam D. Bailey - 2022 - International Philosophical Quarterly 62 (3):335-344.
    Those who occupy positions of authority such as public officials and corporate executives frequently find themselves in contexts in which their choices can be expected to have consequences regarding the distribution of benefits and burdens among various stakeholders. How should such people reason in such contexts so as not to be biased? Herein I set forth and critically examine two answers to this question. The first is based on the work of John Rawls and is intuitively attractive. Nevertheless, I argue (...)
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  40.  17
    An English Printing of "Les Bijoux indiscrets".D. J. Adams - 1986 - Diderot Studies 22:13 - 15.
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  41. An English Printing of Les Bijoux indiscrets in A la mémoire de JR Loy (1918-1985).D. J. Adams - 1986 - Diderot Studies 22:13-15.
     
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  42. CQ Reviews (Greg Loeben, Column Editor) Divided Minds and Successive Selves: Ethical Issues in Disorders of Identity and Personality, by Jennifer Radden.D. M. Adams - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):131-133.
     
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  43. Finding meaning from mutability: making sense and deriving significance through counterfactual thinking.D. Galinsky Adam, A. Liljenquist Katie, L. Kray Laura & J. Roese Neal - 2005 - In David R. Mandel, Denis J. Hilton & Patrizia Catellani (eds.), The Psychology of Counterfactual Thinking. Routledge.
     
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  44.  3
    Ideals 2000: Values for the Twentyfirst Century.D. H. O. Adams - 1993
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  45.  3
    The Way of Harmony: A Sensible, Modern, Unifying Religion and Philosophy for the Twentyfirst Century in a Multicultural World, Set Out in a Short Clear, Summarised Form.D. H. O. Adams - 1995
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  46.  32
    On the Morality of Choosing Directly Against Basic Goods.Adam D. Bailey - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (4):643-649.
    A claim that is widely accepted and often invoked by philosophers working within ‘new classical natural law theory’ is that choosing directly against ‘basic goods’ is never morally permissible. In this essay, I address the question of whether one can coherently accept the fundamental commitments of new classical natural law theory and yet reject this absolutist claim. I argue that one can.
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  47.  36
    Political Perfectionism and the Moral Acceptability of Pure Paternalism.Adam D. Bailey - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):95-112.
    In this essay, I argue against an important position in contemporary perfectionist political philosophy, which holds both that the state is instrumental in nature and that there are principled, rather than merely prudential, limits on the scope of state authority such that pure paternalism is not morally acceptable. By so doing, I provide a conditional defense of the moral acceptability of pure paternalism.
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  48.  33
    Political Perfectionism and the Moral Acceptability of Pure Paternalism.Adam D. Bailey - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):95-112.
    In this essay, I argue against an important position in contemporary perfectionist political philosophy, which holds both that the state is instrumental in nature and that there are principled, rather than merely prudential, limits on the scope of state authority such that pure paternalism is not morally acceptable. By so doing, I provide a conditional defense of the moral acceptability of pure paternalism.
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  49.  36
    Shared Intention and Cooperation with Evil.Adam D. Bailey - 2018 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 92 (4):669-700.
    In a recent essay, Charles F. Capps takes issue with a permissive interpretation of St. Alphonsus Liguori’s influential understanding of cooperation with evil, and develops a more stringent interpretation. In response, I argue that Capps relies on a particular conception of what it is for a cooperator to share a wrongdoer’s bad intention, that this conception of intention sharing is not plausible because it is overly inclusive, and, that on account of this over-inclusiveness, it yields mistaken moral judgments. I then (...)
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  50.  23
    Shared Intention and Cooperation with Evil.Adam D. Bailey - 2018 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 92 (4):669-700.
    In a recent essay, Charles F. Capps takes issue with a permissive interpretation of St. Alphonsus Liguori’s influential understanding of cooperation with evil, and develops a more stringent interpretation. In response, I argue that Capps relies on a particular conception of what it is for a cooperator to share a wrongdoer’s bad intention, that this conception of intention sharing is not plausible because it is overly inclusive, and, that on account of this over-inclusiveness, it yields mistaken moral judgments. I then (...)
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