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Adam Wyner [11]Adam Z. Wyner [1]
  1.  94
    A History of AI and Law in 50 Papers: 25 Years of the International Conference on AI and Law. [REVIEW]Trevor Bench-Capon, Michał Araszkiewicz, Kevin Ashley, Katie Atkinson, Floris Bex, Filipe Borges, Daniele Bourcier, Paul Bourgine, Jack G. Conrad, Enrico Francesconi, Thomas F. Gordon, Guido Governatori, Jochen L. Leidner, David D. Lewis, Ronald P. Loui, L. Thorne McCarty, Henry Prakken, Frank Schilder, Erich Schweighofer, Paul Thompson, Alex Tyrrell, Bart Verheij, Douglas N. Walton & Adam Z. Wyner - 2012 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 20 (3):215-319.
    We provide a retrospective of 25 years of the International Conference on AI and Law, which was first held in 1987. Fifty papers have been selected from the thirteen conferences and each of them is described in a short subsection individually written by one of the 24 authors. These subsections attempt to place the paper discussed in the context of the development of AI and Law, while often offering some personal reactions and reflections. As a whole, the subsections build into (...)
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  2.  15
    Recognizing Cited Facts and Principles in Legal Judgements.Olga Shulayeva, Advaith Siddharthan & Adam Wyner - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):107-126.
    In common law jurisdictions, legal professionals cite facts and legal principles from precedent cases to support their arguments before the court for their intended outcome in a current case. This practice stems from the doctrine of stare decisis, where cases that have similar facts should receive similar decisions with respect to the principles. It is essential for legal professionals to identify such facts and principles in precedent cases, though this is a highly time intensive task. In this paper, we present (...)
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  3.  84
    An Ontology in Owl for Legal Case-Based Reasoning.Adam Wyner - 2008 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 16 (4):361-387.
    The paper gives ontologies in the Web Ontology Language (OWL) for Legal Case-based Reasoning (LCBR) systems, giving explicit, formal, and general specifications of a conceptualisation LCBR. Ontologies for different systems allows comparison and contrast between them. OWL ontologies are standardised, machine-readable formats that support automated processing with Semantic Web applications. Intermediate concepts, concepts between base-level concepts and higher level concepts, are central in LCBR. The main issues and their relevance to ontological reasoning and to LCBR are discussed. Two LCBR systems (...)
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  4.  11
    Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments.Rūta Liepiņa, Giovanni Sartor & Adam Wyner - 2020 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (1):69-89.
    Disputes over causes play a central role in legal argumentation and liability attribution. Legal approaches to causation often struggle to capture cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. In this paper, we first assess three current theories of causation to illustrate their strengths and weaknesses in capturing cause-in-fact. Secondly, we introduce a semi-formal framework for modelling causal arguments through strict and defeasible rules. Thirdly, the framework is applied to the Althen vaccine injury case. And lastly, we discuss the need (...)
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  5.  13
    A Functional Perspective on Argumentation Schemes.Adam Wyner - 2016 - Argument and Computation 7 (2-3):113-133.
  6.  61
    A Legal Case OWL Ontology with an Instantiation of Popov V. Hayashi.Adam Wyner & Rinke Hoekstra - 2012 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 20 (1):83-107.
    The paper provides an OWL ontology for legal cases with an instantiation of the legal case Popov v. Hayashi. The ontology makes explicit the conceptual knowledge of the legal case domain, supports reasoning about the domain, and can be used to annotate the text of cases, which in turn can be used to populate the ontology. A populated ontology is a case base which can be used for information retrieval, information extraction, and case based reasoning. The ontology contains not only (...)
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  7.  12
    Senses of ‘Argument’ in Instantiated Argumentation Frameworks.Adam Wyner, Trevor Bench-Capon, Paul Dunne & Federico Cerutti - 2015 - Argument and Computation 6 (1):50-72.
    Argumentation Frameworks provide a fruitful basis for exploring issues of defeasible reasoning. Their power largely derives from the abstract nature of the arguments within the framework, where arguments are atomic nodes in an undifferentiated relation of attack. This abstraction conceals different senses of argument, namely a single-step reason to a claim, a series of reasoning steps to a single claim, and reasoning steps for and against a claim. Concrete instantiations encounter difficulties and complexities as a result of conflating these senses. (...)
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  8.  1
    Working on the Argument Pipeline: Through Flow Issues Between Natural Language Argument, Instantiated Arguments, and Argumentation Frameworks.Adam Wyner, Tom van Engers & Anthony Hunter - 2016 - Argument and Computation 7 (1):69-89.
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  9.  2
    Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments.Rūta Liepiņa, Giovanni Sartor & Adam Wyner - 2020 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (1):69-89.
    Disputes over causes play a central role in legal argumentation and liability attribution. Legal approaches to causation often struggle to capture cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. In this paper, we first assess three current theories of causation to illustrate their strengths and weaknesses in capturing cause-in-fact. Secondly, we introduce a semi-formal framework for modelling causal arguments through strict and defeasible rules. Thirdly, the framework is applied to the Althen vaccine injury case. And lastly, we discuss the need (...)
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  10.  2
    Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments.Rūta Liepiņa, Giovanni Sartor & Adam Wyner - 2020 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 (1):69-89.
    Disputes over causes play a central role in legal argumentation and liability attribution. Legal approaches to causation often struggle to capture cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. In this paper, we first assess three current theories of causation to illustrate their strengths and weaknesses in capturing cause-in-fact. Secondly, we introduce a semi-formal framework for modelling causal arguments through strict and defeasible rules. Thirdly, the framework is applied to the Althen vaccine injury case. And lastly, we discuss the need (...)
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  11.  20
    Introduction for artificial intelligence and law: special issue “natural language processing for legal texts”.Livio Robaldo, Serena Villata, Adam Wyner & Matthias Grabmair - 2019 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 27 (2):113-115.
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  12.  10
    Introduction to Special Issue on Modelling Policy-Making.Adam Wyner & Neil Benn - 2013 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 21 (4):367-369.
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