6 found
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Adebowale Akande [5]Adebowale W. Akande [1]
  1. Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics: The Enron Effect—Love of Money, Corporate Ethical Values, Corruption Perceptions Index , and Dishonesty Across 31 Geopolitical Entities.Modupe Adewuyi, Bolanle Adetoun, Ningyu Tang, Jingqiu Chen, Anna Manganelli, Luigina Canova, Martina Trontelj, Caroline Urbain, Theresa Tang, Allen Stembridge, Petar Skobic, Elisaveta Sardžoska, Marko Polic, Horia Pitariu, Ruja Pholsward, Francisco Pereira, Mehmet Özbek, AAhad Osman-Gani, Johnsto Osagie, Anthony Nnedum, Richard Mpoyi, Alice Moreira, Eva Malovics, Jian Liang, Kilsun Kim, Ali Kazem, Chin-Kang Jen, Abdul Ibrahim, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Linzhi Du, Rosario Correia, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Mark Borg, Abdulgawi Al-Zubaidi, Michael Allen, Adebowale Akande, Peter Vlerick, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Randy Chiu, Ilya Garber, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Thompson Teo, Vivien Lim, Mahfooz Ansari, Toto Sutarso & Thomas Tang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):919-937.
    Monetary intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the dark side of monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics—dishonesty. Dishonesty, a risky prospect, involves cost–benefit analysis of self-interest. We frame good or bad barrels in the environmental context as a proxy of high or low probability of getting caught for dishonesty, respectively. We theorize: The magnitude and intensity of (...)
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  2.  75
    Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics Across 32 Cultures: Good Apples Enjoy Good Quality of Life in Good Barrels.Ningyu Tang, Jingqiu Chen, Martina Trontelj, Caroline Urbain, Theresa Tang, Allen Stembridge, Petar Skobic, Elisaveta Sardžoska, Marko Polic, Horia Pitariu, Ruja Pholsward, Francisco Pereira, Mehmet Özbek, AAhad Osman-Gani, Johnsto Osagie, Anthony Nnedum, Richard Mpoyi, Alice Moreira, Anna Manganelli, Eva Malovics, Jian Liang, Kilsun Kim, Ali Kazem, Chin-Kang Jen, Abdul Ibrahim, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Linzhi Du, Rosario Correia, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Luigina Canova, Mark Borg, Abdulgawi Al-Zubaidi, Michael Allen, Adebowale Akande, Peter Vlerick, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Randy Chiu, Ilya Garber, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Thompson Teo, Vivien Lim, Mahfooz Ansari, Toto Sutarso & Thomas Tang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):893-917.
    Monetary Intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the bright side of Monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics, frames money attitude in the context of pay and life satisfaction, and controls money at the macro-level and micro-level. We theorize: Managers with low love of money motive but high stewardship behavior will have high subjective well-being: pay satisfaction and (...)
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  3.  13
    Risky Business: South African Youths and HIV/AIDS Prevention.Adebowale Akande - 2001 - Educational Studies 27 (3):237-256.
    Behavior change is the only available means of curtailing new HIV infections in South Africa. This study investigated the relationship between sexual risk taking and attitudes to AIDS precautions. The participants were about 25% white, about 30% colored/mixed blood and 45% black in their second year in polytechnics (413 females and 402 males). Participants responded to the 40-item HIV-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. Data indicated that young women showed more positive attitudes to AIDS precautions than young men (reflecting in part (...)
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  4.  13
    The Self‐Perception and Cultural Dimensions: Cross‐Cultural Comparison.Adebowale W. Akande - 2009 - Educational Studies 35 (1):81-92.
    The present study has been conducted with an aim to compare responses of undergraduates from Swaziland to previously reported findings with similar groups of American, Nepalese, Nigerian and Hong Kong. A total sample of 310 males and females in the age range of 20 and 21 were selected from three universities in South Africa. Self‐esteem was measures through the Personal and Academic Self‐Concept Inventory. Self‐esteem scores were found to be positively high depending on the country of the participants. More specifically, (...)
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  5.  4
    Internal Structure of the Children's Motivation Analysis Test--Normative Data.Adebowale Akande - 1997 - Educational Studies 23 (2):277-285.
    The present study investigated normalised stens for 380 Xhosa children in standard 5 using the Children's Motivation Analysis Test. The CMAT was administered to separate groups of girl and boys upper elementary school children, representing the first such normative data available for this instrument in South Africa. The gender differences in the means and standard deviations for the main CMAT subscales for each group are investigated and reported. It is suggested that the norms presented are also recommended for use with (...)
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  6.  3
    Variations in Fearfulness and Worries of Xhosa Children.Adebowale Akande - 2010 - Educational Studies 36 (5):481-491.
    Xhosa‐speaking South African children in school settings face several academic and emotional challenges. These may be due to family obligation, conformity to authority figures and over expectations from parents, teachers and society. This study examines the differences in the number and types of reported fears and worries in 200 South African children and adolescents, between 14 and 18 years of age. Responses to a questionnaire investigating the inventory of fears and worries revealed significant differences in the number, pattern and level (...)
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