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  1.  18
    A Good Death.Tia Powell & Adira Hulkower - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):28-29.
    A good death is hard to find. Family members tell us that loved ones die in the wrong place—the hospital—and do not receive high-quality care at the end of life. This issue of the Hastings Center Report offers two articles from authors who strive to provide good end-of-life care and to prevent needless suffering. We agree with their goals, but we have substantial reservations about the approaches they recommend. Respect for the decisions of patients and their surrogates is a relatively (...)
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  2.  5
    Learning From Covid.Adira Hulkower - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):16-17.
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    It's All Relative.Adira Hulkower & Lauren S. Flicker - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):43-44.
    In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Daniel Brudney suggests that clinicians have an overly deferential attitude toward their patients’ surrogate decision-makers that is rooted in a wrongful investment of moral authority. He maintains that surrogate decision-makers have no moral right to decide for their loved ones and that their value in the decision-making process is limited to their knowledge of their loved one's preferences. If operationalized, Brudney's framework would ease the way for clinicians to remove a surrogate who (...)
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    Empty Spaces.Adira Hulkower - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (5):3-4.
    “I'm Jewish, you know, and my mother said, ‘Always trust the rabbis.’” I never heard Mr. Weisman's refrain from his own lips. I never heard him say any words all. By the time I met him he was in a vegetative state, a man on the precipice of invisibility—white hair, thin pale limbs, melting into sheets of the same color. When I think about Mr. Weisman, I see empty spaces—the absence of his voice, the too-large bed for his shrinking frame, (...)
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