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Adrian Jones [5]Adrian N. Jones [2]
  1.  49
    A Essay on the Essay.Adrian N. Jones - 2018 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 17 (2):147402221664526.
    Everyone who writes anything – even non-fiction! – knows you discover things as you go along. Writing is a heuristic. Writing history is no different. Yet senior-secondary and tertiary exponents of the teaching and learning of history are often strangely tongue-tied on the matter of writing and thinking as engines of discovery in historical studies in particular, and in the humanities and sciences in general. The quirks and customs of the actual research and writing practices underpinning knowledge of histories, whatever (...)
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  2.  20
    Reporting in Prose: Reconsidering Ways of Writing History.Adrian Jones - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (3):311-336.
    This article reconsiders history's ways of reporting in prose. Ways of analysing and writing history so as to evoke a past are contrasted with ways of analysing and writing history so as to frame theses about a past. Academic norms now favour theses. It was not always so. This article contrasts very early European theories about writing prose, including key writings by Johannine Christians and by Heraclitus. Influenced by Martin Heidegger's existentialist phenomenology, this article reasserts the worth of the evocative (...)
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  3.  2
    Civic Engagement and the Arts and Humanities: An Australian Perspective.Adrian Jones - 2015 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 14 (3):298-304.
    An Australian scholar in the Arts and Humanities responds to recent US models emphasizing civic-engaged learning as a way to renew the humanities in undergraduate education. Policy contexts and curriculum initiatives of kindred trends in recent Australian undergraduate education in the humanities are contrasted in this essay. The Australian experience reiterates the worth of a turn towards engaging undergraduates in active learning contexts which take them out of classrooms and libraries.
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  4.  53
    Alain Badiou and Authentic Revolutions: Methods of Intellectual Enquiry.Adrian Jones - 2011 - Thesis Eleven 106 (1):39-55.
    This study explores new philosophical foundations for democracy in revolutions. Alain Badiou’s thought is in focus, but this essay is not just an exegesis. The thought of Alain Badiou is appraised in this essay in the light of the main currents of European thought on the hopes and history of European revolutions. This essay dismisses Badiou’s ultra-gauche Maoism, focusing instead on Badiou’s ways to reconcile revolutionary change, social inclusion and human freedom. These ways are important. By overcoming hegemonic traditions of (...)
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  5.  60
    History’s ‘So It Seems’: Heidegger-Ian Phenomenologies and History.Adrian Jones - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):1-35.
    This article entitled “History's `So it seems'” explores the potential of phenomenology for the framing of histories which privilege partcipant perspectives. The theory agenda of the article adapts insights drawn from Heidegger's ontological hermeneutic of Da-sein - the human condition of being-there and being-aware (or not aware). The theory agenda also adapts Heidegger's readings of Heraclitus. The practical agenda of the article illustrates this potential of Heidegger's phenomenology for history by contrasting `so it once seemed' senses of the Emperor Julian (...)
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  6. A (Theory and Pedagogy) Essay on the (History) Essay.Adrian N. Jones - 2018 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 17 (2):222-240.
    Everyone who writes anything – even non-fiction! – knows you discover things as you go along. Writing is a heuristic. Writing history is no different. Yet senior-secondary and tertiary exponents of the teaching and learning of history are often strangely tongue-tied on the matter of writing and thinking as engines of discovery in historical studies in particular, and in the humanities and sciences in general. The quirks and customs of the actual research and writing practices underpinning knowledge of histories, whatever (...)
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