Results for 'Aesthetics, Fictionality, Dissertation'

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  1. Truth in Fiction.David Lewis - 1978 - American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (1):37--46.
    It is advisable to treat some sorts of discourse about fiction with the aid of an intensional operator "in such-And-Such fiction...." the operator may appear either explicitly or tacitly. It may be analyzed in terms of similarity of worlds, As follows: "in the fiction f, A" means that a is true in those of the worlds where f is told as known fact rather than fiction that differ least from our world, Or from the belief worlds of the community in (...)
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  2. Morality, Fiction, and Possibility.Brian Weatherson - 2004 - Philosophers' Imprint 4:1-27.
    Authors have a lot of leeway with regard to what they can make true in their story. In general, if the author says that p is true in the fiction we’re reading, we believe that p is true in that fiction. And if we’re playing along with the fictional game, we imagine that, along with everything else in the story, p is true. But there are exceptions to these general principles. Many authors, most notably Kendall Walton and Tamar Szabó Gendler, (...)
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  3. Postscript to Truth in Fiction.David Lewis - 1983 - In Philosophical Papers. Oxford University Press. pp. 276-280.
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  4. Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality (I).Kendall Lewis Walton - 1994/2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 68:27-50.
  5. On the (so-Called) Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Kendall Lewis Walton - 2006 - In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press. pp. 137-148.
  6. Fictional Assent and the (so-Called) `Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance'.Derek Matravers - 2003 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. pp. 91-106.
    This article criticises existing solutions to the 'puzzle of imaginative resistance', reconstrues it, and offers a solution of its own. About the Book : Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts is the first comprehensive collection of papers by philosophers examining the nature of imagination and its role in understanding and making art. Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of (...)
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    Adrienne Chaplin-Dengerink, Mind, Body and Art: The Problem of Meaning in the Cognitive Aesthetics of Susanne K. Langer. Amsterdam, 1999: Dissertation Vrije Universiteit. 328 Pp. [REVIEW]G. M. Birtwistle - 2000 - Philosophia Reformata 65 (2):197-200.
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    The Aesthetics of the Graz School.Venanzio Raspa (ed.) - 2010 - Ontos Verlag.
    This is the first volume devoted to the aesthetics of the Graz school. V. Raspa’s introduction gives an outline of the aesthetic themes and exponents of the school. D. Jacquette argues for a Meinongian subjectivistic aesthetic value theory. B. Langlet deals with aesthetic properties and emotions. Ch.G. Allesch presents Witasek's aesthetics in its historical context. Í. Vendrell Ferran investigates the aesthetic experience and quasi-feelings in Meinong, Witasek, Saxinger and Schwarz. R. Martinelli illustrates the musical aesthetics of Ehrenfels, Höfler and Witasek. (...)
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  9. Toward an Aesthetics of New-Media Environments.Eran Guter - 2016 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics.
    In this paper I suggest that, over and above the need to explore and understand the technological newness of computer art works, there is a need to address the aesthetic significance of the changes and effects that such technological newness brings about, considering the whole environmental transaction pertaining to new media, including what they can or do offer and what users do or can do with such offerings, and how this whole package is integrated into our living spaces and activities. (...)
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  10. Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art: The Analytic Tradition: An Anthology.Peter Lamarque & Stein Haugom Olsen (eds.) - 2003 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This anthology provides comprehensive coverage of the major contributions of analytic philosophy to aesthetics and the philosophy of art, from the earliest beginnings in the 1950’s to the present time. Traces the contributions of the analytic tradition to aesthetics and the philosophy of art, from the 1950’s to the present time. Designed as a comprehensive guide to the field, it presents the most often-cited papers that students and researchers encounter. Addresses a wide range of topics, including identifying art, ontology, intention (...)
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  11. Expression and Form: Principles of a Philosophical Aesthetics According to Hans Urs von Balthasar.Michael Maria Waldstein - 1981 - Dissertation, University of Dallas
    The purpose of the dissertation is to present a philosophical reading of Balthasar's teaching on the polarity of expression and form in beauty. ;Chapter I, "Expression," presents the concept of expression in the context of the aesthetic doctrine of Wahrheit. It confronts Balthasar's teaching about expression with an alternate view. On the basis of the clarification achieved in this confrontation, the chapter turns to some major texts from Herrlichkeit in which Balthasar unfolds the structure of expression. ;Chapter II, "Form," (...)
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  12. Empirically Investigating Imaginative Resistance.Shen-yi Liao, Nina Strohminger & Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):339-355.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. Philosophers have primarily theorized about this phenomenon from the armchair. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of empirical methods for investigating imaginative resistance. We present two studies that help to establish the psychological reality of imaginative resistance, and to uncover one factor that is significant for explaining this phenomenon but low in psychological salience: genre. Furthermore, our studies have the methodological upshot of showing (...)
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    L’estetica dimenticata: la vicenda della scuola di Graz.Venanzio Raspa - 2014 - Rivista di Estetica 56:217-252.
    The essay gives an account of the aesthetics of the Graz school, focusing on the standpoint of the object as well as on that of emotions. Meinong’s reflection on aesthetics stems from a psychological background and comes subsequently to an ontological grounding. After examining the notions of imagination, phantasy-representation, relation and complexion, I show how the theory of production of representations, as well as that of higher-order objects, develops under the impulse of Ehrenfels’ concept of Gestalt qualities; both these theories (...)
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  14. Categories of Art.Kendall L. Walton - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (3):334-367.
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  15. What Does Batman Think About Spongebob? Children's Understanding of the Fantasy/Fantasy Distinction.Deena Skolnick & Paul Bloom - 2006 - Cognition 101 (1):B9-B18.
  16. Make-Believe Morality and Fictional Worlds.Mary Mothersill - 2006 - In José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.), Arts and Morality. Routledge. pp. 74-94.
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  17. Fictional and Aesthetic Objects: Meinong’s Point of View.Venanzio Raspa - 2006 - In A. Bottani & R. Davies (eds.), Modes of Existence. Papers in Ontology and Philosophical Logic. Ontos Verlag. pp. 47-80.
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    Segni, espressioni “umbratili” e oggetti finzionali. Semiotica e teoria della finzione in Meinong.Venanzio Raspa - 2011 - Studi Urbinati. B: Scienze Umane E Sociali 81:161-193.
    The aim of this paper is to apply Meinong’s theory of signs to an analysis of literary texts. The focus lies on words and sentences which, according to Meinong, expressing fantasy experiences when they occur in literary texts. He distinguishes between “serious-like” and “shadow-like” fantasy experiences. The former can be detached from their fictional context, i.e., they are also understandable in other contexts. The latter, instead, are dependent on their fictional contexts. This implies that shadow-like fantasy experiences are less specific (...)
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  19. Moral Defects, Aesthetic Defects, and the Imagination.Amy Mullin - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):249–261.
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    Sir Philip Sidney's Dilemma: On the Ethical Function of Narrative Art.Daniel Jacobson - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):327-336.
  21. Wonder and Sublimity: Revisions of a Classical Topos in the Philosophy and Aesthetics of the German Enlightenment.John Gerard Moore - 1998 - Dissertation, Emory University
    The dissertation considers what is at stake when theoretical wonder ceases to be an originating affect for speculative thought and becomes, instead, a limiting concept for critical philosophy. It attempts to show that: wonder functions for its classical proponents in an entirely different context than that presupposed by the aesthetics of the sublime . This difference can be ascribed to the way in which the feeling of the sublime is operative in the overcoming of modern theodicy , whereas wonder (...)
     
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  22. Hume's Science of Aesthetics: Human Nature and the Century of Criticism.Justine Noel - 1993 - Dissertation, Queen's University at Kingston (Canada)
    Although Hume did not produce any major work in aesthetics, several of his essays, as well as numerous passages in A Treatise of Human Nature and in An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, do address central debates in eighteenth-century aesthetics. In this dissertation I show that Hume made some interesting contributions to these debates that in fact changed the course of aesthetic inquiry. He was the first British thinker to apply systematically an empirical method to such aesthetic concepts (...)
     
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  23. Publicity and Judgment: The Political Theory Behind Kantian Aesthetics.Andrew Norris - 1995 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    This dissertation evaluates the efforts of modern philosophers of aesthetics and politics to distinguish judgment from both cognition and volition. To see the rule under which any given particular is to be subsumed as a law fabricated and imposed by either God or reason is to characterize free judgment in terms of sovereignty. This generates the skeptical dilemma of an infinite regress of the legitimacy of the rule's application that can only be avoided by seeing the act of judgment (...)
     
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  24. Aesthetics and History: A Study of Lessing, Rousseau, Kant, and Schiller.Timothy Sean Quinn - 1985 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    This dissertation treats two themes crucial for the emergence of modern aesthetics. First, it considers the "aesthetic consciousness," which results from a rejection of the Aristotelian mimesis doctrine, and which seeks to establish art as independent from either morality or nature. Second, it treats the "historical consciousness," required to bring about the aesthetic consciousness, and eventually to raise it to the level of a moral ideal. Thus, the dissertation begins by considering that version of the mimetic argument rejected (...)
     
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  25. Reconstructing Aesthetics: John Dewey, Expression Theory, and Cultural Criticism.Paul C. Taylor - 1997 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    Contemporary analytic aestheticians have little interest in the old paradigm of expression theory. They observe that expression theorists tend to locate the essence of art in the externalization of emotion, and they argue persuasively that this tendency is unfortunate. Then they consign expression theorists like Dewey; Collingwood, and Croce to the dustbin of history. This dismissive posture has become standard in aesthetics, for some good reasons. But at least in the case of Dewey, the reasons don't apply. The burden of (...)
     
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  26. Film Worlds: A Philosophical Aesthetics of Cinema.Daniel Yacavone - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    _Film Worlds_ unpacks the significance of the "worlds" that narrative films create, offering an innovative perspective on cinema as art. Drawing on aesthetics and the philosophy of art in both the continental and analytic traditions, as well as classical and contemporary film theory, it weaves together multiple strands of thought and analysis to provide new understandings of filmic representation, fictionality, expression, self-reflexivity, style, and the full range of cinema's affective and symbolic dimensions. Always more than "fictional worlds" and "storyworlds" on (...)
     
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  27. The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabo Gendler - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55-81.
  28. The Expression of Feeling in Imagination.Richard Moran - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (1):75-106.
  29. Puzzling Over the Imagination: Philosophical Problems, Architectural Solutions.Jonathan M. Weinberg & Aaron Meskin - 2006 - In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford University Press. pp. 175-202.
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    Imaginative Resistance Revisited.Tamar Szabo Gendler - 2006 - In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press. pp. 149-173.
  31. The Moral Psychology of Fiction.Gregory Currie - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):250 – 259.
    What can we learn from fiction? I argue that we can learn about the consequences of a certain course of action by projecting ourselves, in imagination, into the situation of the fiction's characters.
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  32. The Tower of Goldbach and Other Impossible Tales.Kathleen Stock - 2003 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. pp. 107-124.
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  33. Ornamentality in the New Media.Eran Guter - 2010 - In Anat Biletzki (ed.), Hues of Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Ruth Manor. College Publications. pp. 83-96.
    Ornamentality is pervasive in the new media and it is related to their essential characteristics: dispersal, hypertextuality, interactivity, digitality and virtuality. I utilize Kendall Walton's theory of ornamentality in order to construe a puzzle pertaining to the new media. the ornamental erosion of information. I argue that insofar as we use the new media as conduits of real life, the excessive density of ornamental devices which is prevalent in certain new media environments, forces us to conduct our inquiries under conditions (...)
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  34.  4
    Play Ergo Sum. Un'analisi del videogioco tra finzione, identità e trasporto.Manuel Maximilian Riolo - 2016 - Rome: UniversItalia Editrice.
  35. Fictionality and Imagination, Revisited.Lee Walters - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):15-21.
    I present and discuss a counterexample to Kendall Walton's necessary condition for fictionality that arises from considering serial fictions. I argue that although Walton has not in fact provided a necessary condition for fictionality, a more complex version of Walton's condition is immune from the counterexample.
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  36. The Harmony of the Faculties in Recent Books on the Critique of the Power of Judgment.Paul Guyer - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):201-221.
    When I began working on my dissertation on Kant’s aesthetic theory in 1971, I was able to read virtually all of the extant literature on the Critique of Judgment in English, German, andFrench going back to Hermann Cohen’s Kants Begr¨undung der A¨ sthetik of 1889, while also reading most of what I wanted to read of eighteenth-century British and German aesthetics before Kant—not because I had paid my dues to Evelyn Wood, but just because there was not all that (...)
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    Fictionality and Photography.Richard Woodward - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):279-289.
    In Mimesis as Make-Believe, Kendall Walton gave a pioneering account of the nature of fictionality, which holds that what it is for p to be fictional is for there to exist a prescription to imagine that p. But Walton has recently distanced himself from his original analysis and now holds that prescriptions to imagine are merely necessary conditions on fictionality. Many of the alleged counterexamples that have prompted Walton's retreat are drawn from the field of photography, and it is upon (...)
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  38. Word-Sculpture, Speech Acts, and Fictionality.Peter Alward - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):389-399.
    A common approach to drawing boundary between fiction and non-fiction is by appeal to the kinds of speech acts performed by authors of works of the respective categories. Searle, for example, takes fiction to be the product of illocutionary pretense of various kinds on the part of authors and non-fiction to be the product of genuine illocutionary action.1 Currie, in contrast, takes fiction to be the product of sui generis fictional illocutionary action on the part of authors and non-fiction to (...)
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  39. Dissertation on Musical Taste.Thomas Hastings - 1822 - New York: Da Capo Press.
     
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  40. Essays, Aesthetical and Philosophical Including the Dissertation on the "Connexion Between the Animal and Spiritual in Man,".Friedrich Schiller - 1875 - G. Bell and Sons.
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  41. Interactivity, Fictionality, and Incompleteness.Nathan Wildman & Richard Woodward - forthcoming - In Grant Tavinor & Jon Robson (eds.), The Aesthetics of Videogames. Routledge.
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    Fictive Utterance and the Fictionality of Narratives and Works.David Davies - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):39-55.
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  43. The Fictionality of Plays.John Dilworth - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):263–273.
    The category of works of fiction is a very broad and heterogeneous one. I do have a general thesis in mind about such works, namely, that they themselves are fictional, in much the same way as are the fictional events or entities that they are about. But a defense of such a broad thesis would provide an intractably complex topic for an introductory essay, so I shall here confine myself to a presentation of a similar thesis for narrative theatrical works (...)
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  44. Where Languages End: Ludwig Wittgenstein at the Crossroads of Music, Language, and the World.Eran Guter - 2004 - Dissertation, Boston University
    Most commentators have underplayed the philosophical importance of Wittgenstein's multifarious remarks on music, which are scattered throughout his Nachlass. In this dissertation I spell out the extent and depth of Wittgenstein's engagement with certain problems that are regarded today as central to the field of the aesthetics of music, such as musical temporality, expression and understanding. By considering musical expression in its relation to aspect-perception, I argue that Wittgenstein understands music in terms of a highly evolved, vertically complex physiognomic (...)
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    Marx and Industrial Age Aesthetics of Alienation.Dale Jacquette - 2016 - Cultura 13 (1):89-105.
    Karl Marx’s socio-economic analysis of capitalism and the conditions of industrial production are meant to imply the competitive alienation of workers in at least two important senses: Workers are alienated from their tools and materials because under capitalism they generally do not own, develop or cultivate the means of production or market for products themselves; and Workers are alienated from one another in competitive isolation prior to the evolution of assembly-line production in the classical progression of capitalist manufacturing. The present (...)
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    Samuel Johnson's Principles of Criticism and Imlac's "Dissertation Upon Poetry".Martin Kallich - 1966 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (1):71-82.
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    Beauty and Sensibility in the Thought of Jonathan Edwards: An Essay in Aesthetics and Theological Ethics. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):343-343.
    This is a massive doctor's dissertation completed for the Graduate School of Religion at Yale University. The author demonstrates rather conclusively that the concept of beauty provides Jonathan Edwards with a model for the manner by which God governs the world. What is more, the same concept is employed by Edwards to characterize the goal and means of redemption. For the Edwardsian cogniscenti!--W. A. J.
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    Beauty and Sensibility in the Thought of Jonathan Edwards: An Essay in Aesthetics and Theological Ethics.W. A. J. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):343-343.
    This is a massive doctor's dissertation completed for the Graduate School of Religion at Yale University. The author demonstrates rather conclusively that the concept of beauty provides Jonathan Edwards with a model for the manner by which God governs the world. What is more, the same concept is employed by Edwards to characterize the goal and means of redemption. For the Edwardsian cogniscenti!--W. A. J.
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  49. DISSERTATION ABSTRACT: Sympathy for the Devil: The Paradox of Emotional Response to Fiction. [REVIEW]Gemma Arguello Manresa - 2011/2012 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 4 (1).
     
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  50. Lord, Lewis, and the Institutional Theory of Art.Peggy Zeglin Brand - 1982 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (3):309-314.
    In "Convention and Dickie's Institutional Theory" (British Journal of Aesthetics 1980), Catherine Lord maintains the following thesis: (L) If a work of art is defined as institutional and conventional, then the definition precludes the freedom and creativity associated with art. Lord also maintains that the antecedent of this conditional is false. In this note, I argue that (i) certain confusions and assumptions prevent Lord from showing the antecedent is false, and (ii) even if the antecedent is assumed to be true, (...)
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