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Agneta H. Fischer [24]Agneta Fischer [18]
  1.  41
    Why We Hate.Agneta Fischer, Eran Halperin, Daphna Canetti & Alba Jasini - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):309-320.
    We offer a functional perspective on hate, showing that hate has a unique pattern of appraisals and action tendencies. Hate is based on perceptions of a stable, negative disposition of persons or groups. We hate persons and groups more because of who they are, than because of what they do. Hate has the goal to eliminate its target. Hate is especially significant at the intergroup level, where it turns already devalued groups into victims of hate. When shared among group members, (...)
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  2.  26
    Knowing me, knowing you: emotion differentiation in oneself is associated with recognition of others’ emotions.Jacob Israelashvili, Suzanne Oosterwijk, Disa Sauter & Agneta Fischer - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1461-1471.
    ABSTRACTPrevious research has found that individuals vary greatly in emotion differentiation, that is, the extent to which they distinguish between different emotions when reporting on their own fe...
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  3.  45
    Contempt: Derogating Others While Keeping Calm.Agneta Fischer & Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (4):346-357.
    While philosophers have discussed the emotion of contempt from antiquity to the present day, contempt has received less attention in psychological research. We review the defining features of contempt, both as a short-term emotion and as a more long-lasting sentiment. Contempt is similar to anger in that it may occur after social or moral transgressions, but it differs from anger in its appraisals, actions, and emotivational goals. Unlike anger, contempt arises when a person’s or group’s character is appraised as bad (...)
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  4.  11
    Emotion differentiation dissected: between-category, within-category, and integral emotion differentiation, and their relation to well-being.Yasemin Erbas, Eva Ceulemans, Elisabeth S. Blanke, Laura Sels, Agneta Fischer & Peter Kuppens - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (2):258-271.
    ABSTRACTEmotion differentiation, the ability to describe and label our own emotions in a differentiated and specific manner, has been repeatedly associated with well-being. However, it is unclear exactly what type of differentiation is most strongly related to well-being: the ability to make fine-grained distinctions between emotions that are relatively closely related, the ability to make larger distinctions between very distinct emotions, or the combination of both. To determine which type of differentiation is most predictive of well-being, we performed a comprehensive (...)
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  5.  30
    Author Reply: Why Hate Is Unique and Requires Others for Its Maintenance.Agneta H. Fischer - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):324-326.
    In this reply, I discuss some important issues raised in two commentaries. One relates to the distinction between hate and revenge, which also touches upon the more general problem of the usefulness of distinguishing between various related emotions. I argue that emotion researchers need to define specific emotions carefully in order to be able to examine such emotions without necessarily using emotion words. A second comment focusses on the factors influencing the development of hate over time. The question is whether (...)
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  6.  31
    Where Have All the People Gone? A Plea for Including Social Interaction in Emotion Research.Agneta H. Fischer & Gerben A. van Kleef - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):208-211.
    In the present article we argue that emotional interactions are not appropriately captured in present emotion research and theorizing. Emotional stimuli or antecedents are dynamic and change over time because they often interact and have a specific relationship with the subject. Earlier emotional interactions may, for example, intensify later emotional reactions to a specific person, or our anger reactions towards powerful or powerless others may differ considerably. Thus, we suggest that such social factors not only affect the intensity, but also (...)
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  7. Feelings and Emotions: The Amsterdam Symposium.Nico Frijda & Agneta Fischer - unknown
    As its title suggests, this anthology is a collection of papers presented at a conference on feelings and emotions held in Amsterdam in 2001. One of the symposium’s main goals was to draw some of the most prominent researchers in emotion research together and provide a multi-disciplinary ‘snap shot’ of the state of the art at the turn of the century. In that respect it is truly a cognitive science success story. There are articles from a wide range of fields, (...)
     
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  8. Emotional mimicry as social regulator: theoretical considerations.Ursula Hess & Agneta Fischer - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (5):785-793.
    The goal of this article is to discuss theoretical arguments concerning the idea that emotional mimicry is an intrinsic part of our social being and thus can be considered a social act. For this, we will first present the theoretical assumptions underlying the Emotional Mimicry as Social Regulator view. We then provide a brief overview of recent developments in emotional mimicry research and specifically discuss new developments regarding the role of emotional mimicry in actual interactions and relationships, and individual differences (...)
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  9.  19
    Can perceivers recognise emotions from spontaneous expressions?Disa A. Sauter & Agneta H. Fischer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (3):504-515.
    ABSTRACTPosed stimuli dominate the study of nonverbal communication of emotion, but concerns have been raised that the use of posed stimuli may inflate recognition accuracy relative to spontaneous expressions. Here, we compare recognition of emotions from spontaneous expressions with that of matched posed stimuli. Participants made forced-choice judgments about the expressed emotion and whether the expression was spontaneous, and rated expressions on intensity and prototypicality. Listeners were able to accurately infer emotions from both posed and spontaneous expressions, from auditory, visual, (...)
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  10.  9
    Emotional collectives: How groups shape emotions and emotions shape groups.Gerben A. van Kleef & Agneta H. Fischer - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (1):3-19.
  11.  14
    Social identity salience shapes group-based emotions through group-based appraisals.Toon Kuppens, Vincent Y. Yzerbyt, Sophie Dandache, Agneta H. Fischer & Job van der Schalk - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1359-1377.
  12.  19
    Editorial: The Social Nature of Emotions.Gerben A. van Kleef, Arik Cheshin, Agneta H. Fischer & Iris K. Schneider - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  13.  25
    Attack, disapproval, or withdrawal? The role of honour in anger and shame responses to being insulted.Patricia M. Rodriguez Mosquera, Agneta H. Fischer, Antony S. R. Manstead & Ruud Zaalberg - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (8):1471-1498.
  14.  30
    What Drives the Smile and the Tear: Why Women Are More Emotionally Expressive Than Men.Agneta Fischer & Marianne LaFrance - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (1):22-29.
    In this article we examine gender differences in nonverbal expressiveness, with a particular focus on crying and smiling. We show that women cry and smile more as well as show more facial expressiveness in general, but that the size of this gender difference varies with the social and emotional context. We interpret this variation within a contextual framework. More specifically, we distinguish three factors that predict the size of gender differences in emotional expressiveness: gender-specific norms, social role and situational constraints, (...)
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  15.  14
    Two facets of affective empathy: concern and distress have opposite relationships to emotion recognition.Jacob Israelashvili, Disa Sauter & Agneta Fischer - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (6):1112-1122.
    Theories on empathy have argued that feeling empathy for others is related to accurate recognition of their emotions. Previous research that tested this assumption, however, has reported inconsiste...
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  16.  14
    The role of honour concerns in emotional reactions to offences.Patricia M. Rodriguez Mosquera, Antony S. R. Manstead & Agneta H. Fischer - 2002 - Cognition and Emotion 16 (1):143-163.
  17.  10
    The Role of Honour-related vs. Individualistic Values in Conceptualising Pride, Shame, and Anger: Spanish and Dutch Cultural Prototypes.Agneta H. Fischer - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (2):149-179.
  18.  17
    Sense or sensibility? Social sharers’ evaluations of socio-affective vs. cognitive support in response to negative emotions.Lisanne S. Pauw, Disa A. Sauter, Gerben A. van Kleef & Agneta H. Fischer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (6):1247-1264.
    ABSTRACTWhen in emotional distress, people often turn to others for social support. A general distinction has been made between two types of support that are differentially effective: Whereas socio-affective support temporarily alleviates emotional distress, cognitive support may contribute to better long-term recovery. In the current studies, we examine what type of support individuals seek. We first confirmed in a pilot study that these two types of support can be reliably distinguished. Then, in Study 1, we experimentally tested participants’ support evaluations (...)
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  19.  10
    Stop crying! The impact of situational demands on interpersonal emotion regulation.Lisanne S. Pauw, Disa A. Sauter, Gerben A. van Kleef & Agneta H. Fischer - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (8):1587-1598.
    Crying is a common response to emotional distress that elicits support from the environment. People may regulate another’s crying in several ways, such as by providing socio-affective support (e.g. comforting) or cognitive support (e.g. reappraisal), or by trying to emotionally disengage the other by suppression or distraction. We examined whether people adapt their interpersonal emotion regulation strategies to the situational context, by manipulating the regulatory demand of the situation in which someone is crying. Participants watched a video of a crying (...)
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  20.  11
    Withdraw or affiliate? The role of humiliation during initiation rituals.Liesbeth Mann, Allard R. Feddes, Bertjan Doosje & Agneta H. Fischer - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (1):80-100.
  21.  31
    Relations between emotions, display rules, social motives, and facial behaviour.Ruud Zaalberg, Antony Manstead & Agneta Fischer - 2004 - Cognition and Emotion 18 (2):183-207.
  22.  13
    I hear you : sharers’ expressions and listeners’ inferences of the need for support in response to negative emotions.Lisanne S. Pauw, Disa A. Sauter, Gerben A. van Kleef & Agneta H. Fischer - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (6):1129-1143.
    ABSTRACTWhen in emotional distress, people often turn to others for support. Paradoxically, even when people perceive social support to be beneficial, it often does not result in emotional recovery...
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  23.  2
    Interpreting Emotions From Women With Covered Faces: A Comparison Between a Middle Eastern and Western-European Sample.Mariska E. Kret, Angela T. Maitner & Agneta H. Fischer - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    While new regulations obligate or recommend people to wear medical masks at public places to prevent further spread of the Covid-19 virus, there are still open questions as to what face coverage does to social emotional communication. Previous research on the effects of wearing veils or face-covering niqabs showed that covering of the mouth led to the attribution of negative emotions and to the perception of less intense positive emotions. The current study compares a sample from the Netherlands with a (...)
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  24.  15
    Ability versus vulnerability: Beliefs about men's and women's emotional behaviour.Monique Timmers, Agneta Fischer & Antony Manstead - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (1):41-63.
  25.  4
    Recognition of facial expressions is moderated by Islamic cues.Mariska E. Kret & Agneta H. Fischer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (3):623-631.
  26.  13
    Emotional Mimicry in Social Context: The Case of Disgust and Pride.Agneta H. Fischer, Daniela Becker & Lotte Veenstra - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  27.  11
    Social Referencing and Social Appraisal: Commentary on the Clément and Dukes (2016) and Walle et al. (2016) articles.Antony S. R. Manstead & Agneta H. Fischer - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):262-263.
    We comment on two articles on social referencing and social appraisal. We agree with Walle, Reschke, and Knothe’s argument that at one level of analysis, social referencing and social appraisal are functionally equivalent: In both cases, another person’s emotional expression is observed and this expression informs the observer’s own emotional reactions and behavior. However, we also agree with Clément and Dukes’s view that, there is an important difference between social referencing and social appraisal. We also argue that they are likely (...)
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  28.  9
    How Well Can We Assess Our Ability to Understand Others’ Feelings? Beliefs About Taking Others’ Perspectives and Actual Understanding of Others’ Emotions.Jacob Israelashvili, Disa Sauter & Agneta Fischer - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  29.  9
    Social Motives, Emotional Feelings, and Smiling.Esther Jakobs, Antony S. R. Manstead & Agneta H. Fischer - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (4):321-345.
  30.  3
    The Relationship of Gender Roles and Beliefs to Crying in an International Sample.Leah S. Sharman, Genevieve A. Dingle, Marc Baker, Agneta Fischer, Asmir Gračanin, Igor Kardum, Harry Manley, Kunalan Manokara, Sirirada Pattara-Angkoon, Ad J. J. M. Vingerhoets & Eric J. Vanman - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  31.  10
    Comment: The Emotional Basis of Toxic Affect.Agneta H. Fischer - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (1):57-58.
    I focus on some differences between negative emotional states and how they are coped with in explaining different cardiac risks. The different cognitive, motivational, and physiological characteristics of emotions imply different appraisals of the negative event, and different resources to cope with the event. Cardiovascular activity depends on these different appraisals and coping strategies. For example, cortisol levels have shown to be differently associated with anger and fear responses to social stress. In addition, different ways to regulate one’s emotions are (...)
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  32.  25
    Reconciling emotions with western personhood.Agneta H. Fischer & Jeroen Jansz - 1995 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (1):59–80.
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  33.  4
    Emotional reactions to deviance in groups: the relation between number of angry reactions, felt rejection, and conformity.Marc W. Heerdink, Gerben A. Van Kleef, Astrid C. Homan & Agneta H. Fischer - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  34. Personal Nonverbal Repertoires in facial displays and their relation to individual differences in social and emotional styles.Herman Ilgen, Jacob Israelashvili & Agneta Fischer - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion:1-10.
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  35.  9
    Beyond the universality-specificity dichotomy.Antony S. R. Manstead & Agneta H. Fischer - 2002 - Cognition and Emotion 16 (1):1-9.
  36.  10
    Contempt, like any other social affect, can be an emotion as well as a sentiment.Roger Giner-Sorolla & Agneta H. Fischer - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  37.  10
    Beyond our origin: Adding social context to an explanation of sex differences in emotion expression.Agneta H. Fischer - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):393-394.
    Vigil's socio-relational framework of sex differences in emotional expressiveness emphasizes general sex differences in emotional responding, but largely ignores the social context in which emotions are expressed. There is much empirical evidence showing that sex differences in emotion displays are flexible and a function of specific social roles and demands, rather than a reflection of evolutionary-based social adjustments.
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