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  1.  20
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Future of Philosophy of Education.Liz Jackson, MichaelA Peters, Lei Chen, Zhongjing Huang, Wang Chengbing, Ezekiel Dixon-Román, Aislinn O'Donnell, Yasushi Maruyama, Lisa A. Mazzei, Alison Jones, Candace R. Kuby, Rowena Azada-Palacios, Elizabeth Adams St Pierre, Jacoba Matapo, Gina A. Opiniano, Peter Roberts, Michael Hand, Alecia Y. Jackson, Jerry Rosiek, Te Kawehau Hoskins, Kathy Hytten & Marek Tesar - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (8):1234-1255.
    What is the future of Philosophy of education? Or as many of scholars and thinkers in this final ‘future-focused’ collective piece from the philosophy of education in a new key Series put it, what are the futures—plural and multiple—of the intersections of ‘philosophy’ and ‘education?’ What is ‘Philosophy’; and what is ‘Education’, and what role may ‘enquiry’ play? Is the future of education and philosophy embracing—or at least taking seriously—and thinking with Indigenous ethicoontoepistemologies? And, perhaps most importantly, what is that (...)
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  2.  41
    Contemplative Pedagogy and Mindfulness: Developing Creative Attention in an Age of Distraction.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2):187-202.
    Over the last decade, there has been a considerable expansion of mindfulness programmes into a number of different domains of contemporary life, such as corporations, schools, hospitals and even the military. Understanding the reasons for this phenomenon involves, I argue, reflecting upon the nature of contemporary capitalism and mapping the complexity of navigating new digital technologies that make multiple and accelerated solicitations upon attention and our affective lives. Whilst acknowledging the benefits of mindfulness practice, this article argues that it is (...)
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  3.  48
    Unpredictability, Transformation, and the Pedagogical Encounter: Reflections on “What Is Effective” in Education.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2013 - Educational Theory 63 (3):265-282.
    In this article, Aislinn O'Donnell offers a set of reflections on the relation between therapy and education. In the first section, she examines criticisms of therapeutic education, mobilizing the example of prison education to highlight the difficulties that arise from imposing prescriptive modes of subjectification and socialization in pedagogy. In the second section, she addresses the relation between therapy and education by focusing on just one element of the experience of education: those moments at which a subject has the potential (...)
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  4.  17
    Another Relationship to Failure: Reflections on Beckett and Education.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):260-275.
    Failure is seen as a problem in education. From failing schools, to failing students to rankings of universities, literacy or numeracy, the perception that one has failed to compete or to compare favourably with others has led to a series of policy initiatives internationally designed to ensure ‘success for all’. But when success is measured in comparison with others or against benchmarks or standards, then it is impossible to see how all could be successful given the parameters laid down. What (...)
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  5.  26
    The Matter of Thinking: Material Thinking and the Natural History of Humankind.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2018 - Studier i Pædagogisk Filosofi 6 (1):39-54.
    Contemporary educational policies have recently prioritised the development of generic, core, and transferable skills. This essay reflects on this tendency in the context of the ‘algorithmic condition’ and those discourses that tend toward an image of education that privileges dematerialised skills, practices, and knowledge. It argues that this turn towards dematerialisation is resonant with shifts in a number of diff erent domains, including work, and explores some of the implications of this shift. Instead I suggest an approach to education that (...)
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  6.  15
    Alain Badiou, On Beckett. Eds. Nina Power and Alberto Toscano.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2005 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 36 (3):332-333.
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  7.  26
    Gilbert Simondon , Two Lessons on Animal and Man, Trans. Drew S. Burk . Reviewed By.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (5):406-409.
  8.  9
    Alain Badiou, On Beckett. Eds. Nina Power and Alberto Toscano.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2005 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 36 (2):232-233.
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  9.  11
    Thinking-in-Concert.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2012 - Ethics and Education 7 (3):261-275.
    In this essay, I examine the concept of thinking in Hannah Arendt's writings. Arendt's interest in the experience of thinking allowed her to develop a concept of thinking that is distinct from other forms of mental activity such as cognition and problem solving. For her, thinking is an unending, unpredictable and destructive activity without fixed outcomes. Her understanding of thinking is distinguished from other approaches to thinking that equate it with, for example, problem solving or knowledge. Examples of a?problem-solving?, skills-based (...)
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  10.  7
    Curriculum as Conversation: Vulnerability, Violence, and Pedagogy in Prison.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (4):475-490.
    It is difficult to respond creatively to humiliation, affliction, degradation, or shame, just as it is difficult to respond creatively to the experience of undergoing or inflicting violence. In this article Aislinn O'Donnell argues that if we are to think about how to address gun violence — including mass shootings — in schools, then we need to talk about violence inside and outside schools. Honest, and even difficult, conversations about violence and vulnerability can take place in schools, and there are (...)
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