Order:
  1.  31
    Negative Affect and Counterproductive Workplace Behavior: The Moderating Role of Moral Disengagement and Gender.Al-Karim Samnani, Sabrina Deutsch Salamon & Parbudyal Singh - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (2):1-10.
    There has been growing scholarly interest in understanding individual-level antecedents of counterproductive workplace behavior (CWB). While researchers have found a positive relationship between individuals’ negative affect and engagement in CWB, to date, our understanding of the factors which may affect this relationship is limited. In this study, we investigate the moderating roles of moral disengagement and gender in this relationship. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found that individuals with a greater tendency to experience negative emotions were more likely to engage (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  2.  24
    Workplace Bullying: Considering the Interaction Between Individual and Work Environment.Al-Karim Samnani & Parbudyal Singh - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (3):537-549.
    There has been increased interest in the “dark side” of organizational behavior in recent decades. Workplace bullying, in particular, has received growing attention in the social sciences literature. However, this literature has lacked an integrated approach. More specifically, few studies have investigated causes at levels beyond the individual, such as the group or organization. Extending victim precipitation theory, we present a conceptual model of workplace bullying incorporating factors at the individual-, dyadic-, group-, and organizational-levels. Based on our theoretical model, a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  54
    The Early Stages of Workplace Bullying and How It Becomes Prolonged: The Role of Culture in Predicting Target Responses. [REVIEW]Al-Karim Samnani - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):119-132.
    The extant workplace bullying literature has largely overlooked the potential role of culture. Drawing on cognitive consistency theory, culture’s influence on targets’ reactions toward subtle forms of bullying during its early stages is theorized. This theoretical analysis proposes that employees high in individualism and low in power distance are more likely to engage in resistance-based responses toward subtle acts of bullying than employees high in collectivism and power distance, respectively. Targets’ resistance-based responses, which are also influenced by learned helplessness deficits, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations