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  1.  29
    Belief Polarization is Not Always Irrational.Alan Jern, Kai-min K. Chang & Charles Kemp - 2014 - Psychological Review 121 (2):206-224.
  2.  10
    People Learn Other People’s Preferences Through Inverse Decision-Making.Alan Jern, Christopher G. Lucas & Charles Kemp - 2017 - Cognition 168:46-64.
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  3.  12
    A Decision Network Account of Reasoning About Other People’s Choices.Alan Jern & Charles Kemp - 2015 - Cognition 142:12-38.
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  4. A Taxonomy of Inductive Problems.Charles Kemp & Alan Jern - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 255--260.
     
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  5.  3
    A Computational Framework for Understanding the Roles of Simplicity and Rational Support in People's Behavior Explanations.Alan Jern, Austin Derrow-Pinion & A. J. Piergiovanni - 2021 - Cognition 210:104606.
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  6. Category Generation.Alan Jern & Charles Kemp - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
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  7.  3
    Corrigendum to “People Learn Other People’s Preferences Through Inverse Decision-Making” [Cognition 168 46–64].Alan Jern, Christopher G. Lucas & Charles Kemp - 2018 - Cognition 175:201.
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  8. People Are Intuitive Economists Under the Right Conditions.Alan Jern - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
    Boyer & Petersen argue that a “rudimentary exchange psychology” is responsible for many of people's folk-economic beliefs that are at odds with the consensus views of economists. However, they focus primarily on macroeconomic beliefs. I argue that the same rudimentary exchange psychology could be expected to produce fairly accurate microeconomic intuitions. Existing evidence supports this prediction.
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