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  1.  6
    A Libertarian Reading of Boylan's Natural Human Rights : A Theory.Alan Tomhave - 2016 - Journal of Applied Ethics and Philosophy 8:10-15.
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  2.  42
    On the Disconnect Between Business and Professional Ethics.Alan Tomhave & Mark Vopat - 2013 - Teaching Ethics 13 (2):93-105.
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  3.  50
    Cartesian Intuitions, Humean Puzzles, and the Buddhist Conception of the Self.Alan Tomhave - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):443-457.
    The utilization of Western canonical thinkers to inform and understand thinkers from India and China is nothing new. More specifically, it is very tempting for a Western-trained philosopher to explain the Buddhist conception of the self by reference to David Hume; both seem to be bundle theories. Moreover, in making such a comparison we seem to get a solution to the puzzle that Hume leaves at the end of A Treatise of Human Nature concerning personal identity. Briefly, Hume holds that (...)
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  4.  14
    Advocacy, Autonomy, and Citizenship in the Classroom in Advance.Alan Tomhave - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
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  5.  12
    Global Government and Global Citizenship.Alan Tomhave - 2013 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):287-297.
    T. H. Marshall described three stages of citizenship leading to full membership of the community in which one resides: civil, political, and social. This development takes place within the context of states. It is appropriate at this point in history to ask if there is a further change to citizenship that reflects the increasing globalization of the world, to look into the possibility of a global citizen and ask further if this possible global citizen requires also a global or world (...)
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  6.  7
    Advocacy, Autonomy, and Citizenship in the Classroom.Alan Tomhave - 2015 - Teaching Ethics 15 (1):173-189.
    Should professors engage in classroom advocacy? One argument against such advocacy is the autonomy argument offered by Joel Kupperman. Advocacy, in the sense that Kupperman is concerned with, undermines a student’s making informed decisions about important issues. This paper seeks to do three things. First, it seeks to clarify Kupperman’s autonomy argument.Second, this paper extends the argument against advocacy by buttressing the autonomy argument with an argument from citizenship. This will strengthen Kupperman’s general rule against advocacy by expanding beyond concerns (...)
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  7.  10
    Salience and Chance.Alan Tomhave - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):15-22.
  8.  6
    A Note From the Editors.Mark Vopat & Alan Tomhave - 2015 - Teaching Ethics 15 (2):225-225.