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  1.  28
    The Business of Boycotting: Having Your Chicken and Eating It Too.Alan Tomhave & Mark Vopat - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):123-132.
    We assume that there are certain causes that are morally wrong, worth speaking out against, and working to overcome, e.g., opposition to same sex marriage. This seems to suggest that we should also be boycotting certain businesses; particularly those whose owners advocate such views. Ideally, for the boycotter, this will end up silencing certain views, but this seems to cause two basic problems. First, it appears initially to be coercive, because it threatens the existence of the business. Second, it runs (...)
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  2.  6
    Ethics Across the Curriculum—Pedagogical Perspectives.Elaine E. Englehardt, Michael S. Pritchard, Robert Baker, Michael D. Burroughs, José A. Cruz-Cruz, Randall Curren, Michael Davis, Aine Donovan, Deni Elliott, Karin D. Ellison, Challie Facemire, William J. Frey, Joseph R. Herkert, Karlana June, Robert F. Ladenson, Christopher Meyers, Glen Miller, Deborah S. Mower, Lisa H. Newton, David T. Ozar, Alan A. Preti, Wade L. Robison, Brian Schrag, Alan Tomhave, Phyllis Vandenberg, Mark Vopat, Sandy Woodson, Daniel E. Wueste & Qin Zhu - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    Late in 1990, the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions at Illinois Institute of Technology (lIT) received a grant of more than $200,000 from the National Science Foundation to try a campus-wide approach to integrating professional ethics into its technical curriculum.! Enough has now been accomplished to draw some tentative conclusions. I am the grant's principal investigator. In this paper, I shall describe what we at lIT did, what we learned, and what others, especially philosophers, can learn (...)
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  3.  29
    Advocacy, Autonomy, and Citizenship in the Classroom in Advance.Alan Tomhave - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
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  4.  19
    Advocacy, Autonomy, and Citizenship in the Classroom.Alan Tomhave - 2015 - Teaching Ethics 15 (1):173-189.
    Should professors engage in classroom advocacy? One argument against such advocacy is the autonomy argument offered by Joel Kupperman. Advocacy, in the sense that Kupperman is concerned with, undermines a student’s making informed decisions about important issues. This paper seeks to do three things. First, it seeks to clarify Kupperman’s autonomy argument.Second, this paper extends the argument against advocacy by buttressing the autonomy argument with an argument from citizenship. This will strengthen Kupperman’s general rule against advocacy by expanding beyond concerns (...)
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  5.  11
    A Libertarian Reading of Boylan's Natural Human Rights : A Theory.Alan Tomhave - 2016 - Journal of Applied Ethics and Philosophy 8:10-15.
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  6. Boycotts and Silencing.Alan Tomhave & Mark Vopat - 2020 - Business Ethics Journal Review 8 (8):45-50.
    Jeremy Davis offered critical comments on our article that argued some boycotts are pro tanto morally wrong. We argued against organized boycotts over expressive acts where the actor is attempting to engage in the market place of ideas. Davis offered two versions of a direct objection to our position – one that boycotts are not attempts to silence and one that boycotts do not cause a chilling effect – and one objection based on reframing the goals of boycotts. In this (...)
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  7.  83
    Cartesian Intuitions, Humean Puzzles, and the Buddhist Conception of the Self.Alan Tomhave - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):443-457.
    The utilization of Western canonical thinkers to inform and understand thinkers from India and China is nothing new. More specifically, it is very tempting for a Western-trained philosopher to explain the Buddhist conception of the self by reference to David Hume; both seem to be bundle theories. Moreover, in making such a comparison we seem to get a solution to the puzzle that Hume leaves at the end of A Treatise of Human Nature concerning personal identity. Briefly, Hume holds that (...)
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  8.  23
    Global Government and Global Citizenship.Alan Tomhave - 2013 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):287-297.
    T. H. Marshall described three stages of citizenship leading to full membership of the community in which one resides: civil, political, and social. This development takes place within the context of states. It is appropriate at this point in history to ask if there is a further change to citizenship that reflects the increasing globalization of the world, to look into the possibility of a global citizen and ask further if this possible global citizen requires also a global or world (...)
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  9. On the Disconnect Between Business and Professional Ethics.Alan Tomhave & Mark Vopat - 2013 - Teaching Ethics 13 (2):93-105.
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  10.  13
    Salience and Chance.Alan Tomhave - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):15-22.
  11.  10
    A Note From the Editors.Mark Vopat & Alan Tomhave - 2015 - Teaching Ethics 15 (2):225-225.
  12. Business Ethics: The Big Picture.Mark C. Vopat & Alan Tomhave (eds.) - 2018 - Broadview Press.
    _Business Ethics: The Big Picture_ asks students to focus on the assumptions underlying the activity of business. Why does society provide special protections for businesses? What is the purpose of a corporation? What do businesses owe society? And are there some things that shouldn’t be distributed by the free market? These questions are addressed through classic readings from such central figures as Adam Smith and Karl Marx, in addition to contemporary selections from Milton Friedman, R. Edward Freeman, Debra Satz, and (...)
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