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  1. The Birth of Bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Bioethics represents a dramatic revision of the centuries-old professional ethics that governed the behavior of physicians and their relationships with patients. This venerable ethics code was challenged in the years after World War II by the remarkable advances in the biomedical sciences and medicine that raised questions about the definition of death, the use of life-support systems, organ transplantation, and reproductive interventions. In response, philosophers and theologians, lawyers and social scientists joined together with physicians and scientists to rethink and revise (...)
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  2.  38
    Medical Futility: Its Meaning and Ethical Implications.Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Nancy S. Jecker & Albert R. Jonsen - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  3. The Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning.Albert R. Jonsen & Stephen Toulmin - 1988 - University of California Press.
    In this engaging study, the authors put casuistry into its historical context, tracing the origin of moral reasoning in antiquity, its peak during the sixteenth and early seventeenth century, and its subsequent fall into disrepute from the mid-seventeenth century.
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  4. Back to the Rough Ground: “Phronesis” and “Techne” in Modern Philosophy and in Aristotle by Joseph Dunne.Albert R. Jonsen - 1993 - Common Knowledge 25 (1-3):422-422.
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  5. Clinical Ethics a Practical Approach to Ethical Decisions in Clinical Medicine.Albert R. Jonsen, Mark Siegler & William J. Winslade - 1982
     
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  6.  60
    A Short History of Medical Ethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine and the medical (...)
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  7.  20
    Casuistry: An Alternative or Complement to Principles?Albert R. Jonsen - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (3):237-251.
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  8.  29
    Bentham in a Box: Technology Assessment and Health Care Allocation.Albert R. Jonsen - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):172-174.
  9.  36
    Ethics Consultation: The Least Dangerous Profession?Giles R. Scofield, John C. Fletcher, Albert R. Jonsen, Christian Lilje, Donnie J. Self & Judith Wilson Ross - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (4):417.
    Whether ethics is too important to be left to the experts or so important that it must be is an age-old question. The emergence of clinical ethicists raises it again, as a question about professionalism. What role clinical ethicists should play in healthcare decision making – teacher, mediator, or consultant – is a question that has generated considerable debate but no consensus.
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  10.  15
    3. Bentham in a Box: Technology Assessment and Health Care Allocation.Albert R. Jonsen - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):172-174.
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  11. Casuistry as Methodology in Clinical Ethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (4).
    This essay focuses on how casuistry can become a useful technique of practical reasoning for the clinical ethicist or ethics consultant. Casuistry is defined, its relationship to rhetorical reasoning and its interpretation of cases, by employing three terms that, while they are not employed by the classical rhetoricians and casuists, conform, in a general way, to the features of their work. Those terms are (1) morphology, (2) taxonomy, (3) kinetics. The morphology of a case reveals the invariant structure of the (...)
     
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  12.  11
    Of Balloons and Bicycles; or, The Relationship Between Ethical Theory and Practical Judgment.Albert R. Jonsen - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (5):14-16.
  13.  5
    The New Medicine and the Old Ethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 1990 - Harvard University Press.
    Introduction Watching the Doctor In some cultures, it is said, villagers cluster around a healer and a patient, eagerly listening to their conversation and ...
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  14.  25
    The God Squad and the Origins of Transplantation Ethics and Policy.Albert R. Jonsen - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):238-240.
    The era of replacing human organs and their functions began with chronic dialysis and renal transplantation in the 1960s. These significant medical advances brought unprecedented problems. Among these, the selection of patients for a scarce resource was most troubling. In Seattle, where dialysis originated, a “God Committee” selected which patients would live and die. The debates over such a committee stimulated the origins of bioethics.
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  15. Casuistry and Clinical Ethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 1986 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (1).
    For the last century, moral philosophy has stressed theory for the analysis of moral argument and concepts. In the last decade, interest in the ethical issues of health care has stimulated attention to cases and particular instances. This has revealed the gap between ethical theory and practice. This article reviews the history and method of casuistry which for many centuries provided an approach to practical ethics. Its strengths and weaknesses are noted and its potential for contemporary use explored.
     
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  16.  7
    The God Squad and the Origins of Transplantation Ethics and Policy.Albert R. Jonsen - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):238-240.
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  17.  12
    Special Supplement: The Birth of Bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen, Shana Alexander, Judith P. Swazey, Warren T. Reich, Robert M. Veatch, Daniel Callahan, Tom L. Beauchamp, Stanley Hauerwas, K. Danner Clouser, David J. Rothman, Daniel M. Fox, Stanley J. Reiser & Arthur L. Caplan - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S1.
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  18. Ethics Consultation in Health Care.John C. Fletcher, Norman Quist & Albert R. Jonsen (eds.) - 1989 - Health Administration Press.
     
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  19.  18
    A History of Religion and Bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 2006 - In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press.
    “Bioethics began in religion, but religion has faded from bioethics.” This interpretation is commonplace among many who have an opinion on bioethics. This chapter examines this.
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  20.  23
    American Moralism and the Origin of Bioethics in the United States.Albert R. Jonsen - 1991 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (1):113-130.
    The theology of John Calvin has deeply affected the American mentality through two streams of thought, Puritanism and Jansenism. These traditions formulate moral problems in terms of absolute, clear principles and avoid casuistic analysis of moral problems. This approach is designated American moralism. This article suggests that the bioethics movement in the United States was stimulated by the moralistic mentality but that the work of the bioethics has departed from this viewpoint. Keywords: bioethics, Calvinism, casuistry, Jansenism, moralism, moral principle, Puritanism (...)
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  21.  14
    Beating Up Bioethics. [REVIEW]Albert R. Jonsen - 2001 - Hastings Center Report 31 (5):40.
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  22.  39
    Case Analysis in Clinical Ethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 1990 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (1):63.
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  23.  90
    Why has Bioethics Become so Boring?Albert R. Jonsen - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):689 – 699.
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  24.  10
    Public Ethics and Policy Making.Albert R. Jonsen & Lewis H. Butler - 1975 - Hastings Center Report 5 (4):19-31.
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  25.  12
    Managed Care: A House of Mirrors.Nancy S. Jecker & Albert R. Jonsen - 1997 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (3):230.
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  26.  19
    Strong on Specification.Albert R. Jonsen - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (3):348 – 360.
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  27.  62
    The Decalogue.Albert R. Jonsen - 1963 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 38 (3):421-446.
  28. Morally Appreciated Circumstances: A Theoretical Problem for Casuistry.Albert R. Jonsen - 1996 - In Wayne L. Sumner & Joseph Boyle (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Bioethics. University of Toronto Press. pp. 37--49.
     
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  29. 'O Brave New World': Rationality in Reproduction.Albert R. Jonsen - 1996 - In David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (eds.), Birth to Death: Science and Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 50--57.
     
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  30.  15
    Practice Versus Theory. [REVIEW]Albert R. Jonsen - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (4):32.
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  31. Bioethics Beyond the Headlines: Who Lives? Who Dies? Who Decides?Albert R. Jonsen - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Bioethics Beyond the Headlines is a primer in bioethics. You will not find convoluted philosophical arguments in this volume. Rather, you will find an engaging sampling of the key questions in bioethics, including euthanasia, assisted reproduction, cloning and stem cells, neuroscience, access to healthcare, and even research on animals and questions of environmental ethics—areas typically overlooked in general introductions to bioethics.
     
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  32.  11
    Encephaloethics: A History of the Ethics of the Brain.Albert R. Jonsen - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):37 – 42.
  33.  10
    Any Help From Strangers at the Benchside?Albert R. Jonsen - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):19 – 20.
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  34.  17
    The Abuse of Futility.Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Nancy S. Jecker & Albert R. Jonsen - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (3):295-313.
    Two recent policy statements by providers of critical care representing the United States and Europe have rejected the concept and language of “medical futility,” on the ground that there is no universal consensus on a definition. They recommend using “potentially inappropriate” or “inappropriate” instead. As Bosslet and colleagues state: The term “potentially inappropriate” should be used, rather than futile, to describe treatments that have at least some chance of accomplishing the effect sought by the patient, but clinicians believe that competing (...)
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  35.  12
    The Artificial Heart's Threat to Others.Albert R. Jonsen - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (1):9-11.
  36.  33
    The Reality of Culture.Albert R. Jonsen - 1957 - Modern Schoolman 35 (1):52-59.
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  37.  5
    Beating Up BioethicsBioethics in America. Origins and Cultural PoliticsCulture of Death. The Assault on Medical Ethics in America.Albert R. Jonsen, M. L. Tina Stevens & Wesley J. Smith - 2001 - Hastings Center Report 31 (5):40.
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  38.  38
    Comments on Andre de Vries' Reflections on a Medical Ethics for the Future.Albert R. Jonsen - 1982 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (1):135-137.
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  39.  13
    Outsider/Insider.Albert R. Jonsen - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (6):6-7.
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  40.  7
    Common Law MoralityThe Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning.John D. Arras, Albert R. Jonsen & Stephen Toulmin - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (4):35.
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  41.  11
    The Totally Implantable Artificial Heart.Albert R. Jonsen - 1973 - Hastings Center Report 3 (5):1-4.
  42. Ética de la eutanasia.Albert R. Jonsen - 2003 - Humanitas 1 (1):87-96.
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  43.  27
    Reproduction and Rationality.Albert R. Jonsen - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (3):263.
    Many years ago, the esteemed patriarch of bioethics, Joseph Fletcher, spoke loud and clear in favor of rationality in reproduction. By rationality, he meant not merely limiting population growth, which he certainly favored, but bringing to bear human analytic and creative intelligence on the random and instinctive activities of sexual intercourse and procreation that we share with all mammals. In his 1974 book, The Ethics of Genetic Control: Ending Reproductive Roulette, he foresaw most of the issues that we are facing (...)
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  44.  10
    Ethics by the BookClinical Ethics: A Practical Approach to Ethical Decisions in Clinical Medicine.Henry Aranow, Albert R. Jonsen, Mark Siegler & William J. Winslade - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (1):32.
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  45.  40
    Organ Transplants and the Principle of Fairness.Albert R. Jonsen - 1985 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (1):37-39.
  46.  25
    Morality in the Valley of the Moon: The Origins of the Ethics of Neonatal Intensive Care. [REVIEW]Albert R. Jonsen - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):65-74.
    One of the first areas of ethical concern in medicine was the neonatal intensive care unit. Questions first seen in this context soon entered the discourse of bioethical debate. The history of the ethics of neonatal care is described from the context of neonatology, and the emerging principles are outlined.
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  47.  23
    Participation in Torture and Interrogation: An Inexcusable Breach of Medical Ethics—A Call to Hold Military Medical Personnel Accountable to Accepted Professional Standards.Philip R. Lee, Marcus Conant, Albert R. Jonsen & Steve Heilig - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (2):202-203.
    The profession of medicine has developed codes of ethical conduct for thousands of years. From the Hippocratic Oath of ancient Greece onward to modern times, a universal and central element of such codes has expressed the imperative that a physician shall “Do no harm.”.
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  48.  22
    Guest Editorial: A Note on the Notion of Commercialism.Albert R. Jonsen - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (4):368.
    The essays in this Special Section are about the ethics of Commercialism in Medicine. They are written, for the most part, by bioethicists, with the support of several prominent physicians and a health policy lawyer. This journal is, of course, devoted to ethics. Thus, our intent is to subject the question of commercialism in medicine to ethical scrutiny. Much has been written about commercialism in healthcare but very little about the ethics of commercialism in healthcare. One of our authors, Dr. (...)
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  49.  39
    "Life is Short, Medicine is Long": Reflections on a Bioethical Insight.Albert R. Jonsen - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):667 – 673.
    The famous first aphorism of Hippocrates, "Life is short, the art is long" was long considered a perfect summary of medical ethics. Modern physicians find the words impossible to understand. But it can be interpreted as a fundamental insight into the ethical problems of modern medicine. The technology of modern scientific medicine can sustain life, even when life is losing its vitality. How should decisions be made about the use of technology and by whom? This is the incessant question of (...)
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  50.  29
    Conclusion.William S. Andereck & Albert R. Jonsen - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (4):439.
    These last words are titled “Conclusion,” but they should be “Inception.” Professor Jacob Needleman encourages a vigorous conversation about commercialism in medicine. An honest conversation, he maintains, will spur understanding, indignation, and reformation. We do sincerely hope that such a conversation begins and is carried on to meaningful change. However, as the essays in this collection show, that conversation must take place in many different places and about many different things. All of our authors acknowledge that the problem of commercialism (...)
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