Order:
  1.  69
    Framing Effects in International Relations.Alex Mintz & Steven B. Redd - 2003 - Synthese 135 (2):193 - 213.
    Framing is the least well-developed central concept of prospect theory. Framing is both fundamental to prospect theory and remarkably underdeveloped in the prospect theory literature. This paper focuses on the many subtypes and variations of framing: thematic vs. evaluative; successful vs. failed; productive vs. counterproductive; purposeful, structural and interactive framing; counterframing; loss frames vs. gain frames; revolving framing vs. sequential framing; framing by a third party; and framing vs. priming. The bulk of the paper provides an analysis of framing and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  14
    Framing Effects in International Relations.Alex Mintz & Steven Redd - 2003 - Synthese 135 (2):193-213.
    Framing is the least well-developed central concept of prospect theory. Framing is both fundamental to prospect theory and remarkably underdeveloped in the prospect theory literature. This paper focuses on the many subtypes and variations of framing: thematic vs. evaluative; successful vs. failed; productive vs. counterproductive; purposeful, structural and interactive framing; counterframing; loss frames vs. gain frames; revolving framing vs. sequential framing; framing by a third party; and framing vs. priming. The bulk of the paper provides an analysis of framing and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  58
    Mathematical Models of Foreign Policy Decision-Making: Compensatory Vs. Noncompensatory.Alex Mintz, Nehemia Geva & Karl Derouen - 1994 - Synthese 100 (3):441 - 460.
    There are presently two leading foreign policy decision-making paradigms in vogue. The first is based on the classical or rational model originally posited by von Neumann and Morgenstern to explain microeconomic decisions. The second is based on the cybernetic perspective whose groundwork was laid by Herbert Simon in his early research on bounded rationality. In this paper we introduce a third perspective — thepoliheuristic theory of decision-making — as an alternative to the rational actor and cybernetic paradigms in international relations. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  15
    Mathematical Models of Foreign Policy Decision-Making: Compensatory Vs. Noncompensatory.Alex Mintz, Nehemia Geva & Karl Derouen Jr - 1994 - Synthese 100 (3):441 - 460.
    There are presently two leading foreign policy decision-making paradigms in vogue. The first is based on the classical or rational model originally posited by von Neumann and Morgenstern to explain microeconomic decisions. The second is based on the cybernetic perspective whose groundwork was laid by Herbert Simon in his early research on bounded rationality. In this paper we introduce a third perspective -- the poliheuristic theory of decision-making -- as an alternative to the rational actor and cybernetic paradigms in international (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark