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Alexander Morgan Capron [98]Alexander M. Capron [23]
  1.  22
    Where Did Informed Consent for Research Come From?Alexander Morgan Capron - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):12-29.
    To understand the future of informed consent, we should pay attention to two ethical-legal sources in addition to the revised Common Rule. Physicians acting as investigators and patients serving as research subjects bring to that relationship a long history regarding consent to treatment, and everyone dealing with research ethics needs to be aware of the Nuremberg Code and other human-rights documents. These three streams make separate and distinctly different contributions to informed consent doctrine.
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  2.  21
    Building the Next Bioethics Commission.Alexander M. Capron - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (S1):4-9.
    At every moment, somewhere in the world, a group of men and women are sitting around a table deliberating about an ethical issue posed by medicine and research, whether as a research ethics committee; a hospital or clinical ethics committee; a stem‐cell review committee; a gene transfer research committee; a biobank ethics committee; an ethics advisory committee for a medical or nursing association or nongovernmental organization; a state, provincial, national, or intergovernmental bioethics committee; or an ad hoc panel examining a (...)
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  3.  23
    At Last! Aye, and There's the Rub.Alexander M. Capron - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):4-7.
    Mea culpa. In 1981 the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research, of which I was the Executive Director, recommended to the President and Congress that all federal departments and agencies that conduct or support human subjects research adopt “as a common core” the HHS regulations, “while permitting additions needed by any department or agency that are not inconsistent with these core provisions.” The commission believed—rightly, I still think—that having uniformity would ease (...)
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  4.  26
    In Re Helga Wanglie.Alexander Morgan Capron - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 21 (5):26-28.
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  5.  21
    Abandoning a Waning Life.Alexander Morgan Capron - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 25 (4):24-26.
  6.  19
    In Re Helga Wanglie.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (5):26-28.
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  7.  50
    Adrift in the gray zone: IRB perspectives on research in the learning health system.Sandra Soo-Jin Lee, Maureen Kelley, Mildred K. Cho, Stephanie Alessi Kraft, Cyan James, Melissa Constantine, Adrienne N. Meyer, Douglas Diekema, Alexander M. Capron, Benjamin S. Wilfond & David Magnus - 2016 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 7 (2):125-134.
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  8.  16
    Abandoning a Waning Life.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (4):24-26.
  9.  11
    Covid‐19, Free Exercise, and the Changing Constitution.Alexander Morgan Capron - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (6):6-10.
    The Covid‐19 pandemic has brought bioethics back to five topics—justice, autonomy, expert authority, religion, and judicial decisions—that were central during its formative period but has cast a new light on each, while also tangling public health policy in the current, rather radical, reshaping of the role of organized religion in society.
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  10.  29
    Anencephalic Donors: Separate the Dead From the Dying.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (1):5-9.
    Proposals to use organs from anencephalic infants to meet the growing need for transplantable ogans are well‐meaning but misguided. It would be unwise to amend the Uniform Determination of Death Act to classify anencephalics as “dead.” They are in the same situation as other patients (such as the permanently comatose). Likewise, amending the Anatomical Gin Act to permit organs to be removed from anencephalics would be unjust would set a bad precedent and would likely reduce overall success in this field.
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  11.  30
    Organ Markets: Problems Beyond Harms to Vendors.Alexander M. Capron, Gabriel M. Danovitch & Francis L. Delmonico - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (10):23-25.
  12.  29
    The Real Problem Is Consent for Treatment, Not Consent for Research.Alexander M. Capron - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (12):27-29.
  13.  22
    At law.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (5):42-43.
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  14.  22
    At Law: Medical Futility: Strike Two.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (5):42.
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  15.  74
    How Can Hospital Futility Policies Contribute to Establishing Standards of Practice?Lawrence J. Schneiderman & Alexander Morgan Capron - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (4):524-531.
    A few years ago a battered infant was admitted to a California hospital. After a period of observation and testing, the physicians concluded that the infant had been beaten so badly that his brain was almost completely destroyed, leaving him permanently unconscious. The hospital had just adopted a policy specifying that life-sustaining treatment for permanent unconsciousness was futile and, therefore, not indicated. According to this policy, after suitable subspecialty consultations and deliberations, including efforts to gain parental agreement and documentation of (...)
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  16.  28
    Are There Public Health Domains in “Domain-Specific” Health Nudging?Alexander Morgan Capron - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):47-49.
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  17. Ethical Norms and the International Governance of Genetic Databases and Biobanks: Findings from an International Study.Alexander Morgan Capron, Alexandre Mauron, Bernice Simone Elger, Andrea Boggio, Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):101-124.
    This article highlights major results of a study into the ethical norms and rules governing biobanks. After describing the methodology, the findings regarding four topics are presented: (1) the ownership of human biological samples held in biobanks; (2) the regulation of researchers’ use of samples obtained from biobanks; (3) what constitutes “collective consent” to genetic research, and when it is needed; and (4) benefit sharing and remuneration of research participants. The paper then summarizes key lessons to be drawn from the (...)
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  18.  57
    Legalizing Physician-Aided Death.Alexander M. Capron - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):10.
    Physician aid in dying is a broader topic than euthanasia in that the latter usually refers to active euthanasia, while physician assistance also encompasses the issue of assisted suicide. Volumes could be and have been written on physician-assisted death. But my purpose here is to address a specific aspect of the topic: the policy implications with regard to proposed legislation on physician-aided death.Although the title's reference to physician assistance suggests a focus on the role of the professional, what people often (...)
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  19.  30
    At Law: Baby Ryan and Virtual Futility.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (2):20.
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  20.  35
    At Law: Constitutionalizing Death.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (6):23.
  21.  25
    Euthanasia in the Netherlands American Observations.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (2):30-33.
  22.  15
    Looking Back at the President's Commission.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (5):7-10.
  23.  17
    Oregon's Disability Principles or Politics?Alexander Morgan Capron - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (6):18-20.
  24.  8
    Neither Ethical nor Prudent: Why Not to Choose Normothermic Regional Perfusion.Adam Omelianchuk, Alexander Morgan Capron, Lainie Friedman Ross, Arthur R. Derse, James L. Bernat & David Magnus - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    In transplant medicine, the use of normothermic regional perfusion (NRP) in donation after circulatory determination of death raises ethical difficulties. NRP is objectionable because it restores the donor's circulation, thus invalidating a death declaration based on the permanent cessation of circulation. NRP's defenders respond with arguments that are tortuous and factually inaccurate and depend on introducing extraneous concepts into the law. However, results comparable to NRP's—more and higher‐quality organs and more efficient allocation—can be achieved by removing organs from deceased donors (...)
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  25.  10
    Catastrophic Diseases: Who Decides What?Jay Katz & Alexander Morgan Capron - 1975 - Russell Sage Foundation.
    People do not choose to suffer from catastrophic illnesses, but considerable human choice is involved in the ways in which the participants in the process treat and conduct research on these diseases. Catastrophic Diseases draws a powerful and humane portrait of the patients who suffer from these illnesses as well as of the physician-investigators who treat them, and describes the major pressures, conflicts, and decisions which confront all of them. By integrating a discussion of "facts" and "values," the authors highlight (...)
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  26.  18
    Substituting Our Judgment.Alexander Morgan Capron - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 22 (2):58-59.
  27.  31
    At Law: Parenthood and Frozen Embryos More Than Property and Privacy.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (5):32.
  28.  6
    When Experiments Go Wrong: The U.S. Perspective.Alexander M. Capron - 2004 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 15 (1):22-29.
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  29.  19
    Do We Count?Alexander M. Capron - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (5):39-41.
    In the article “A Conceptual Model for the Translation of Bioethics Research and Scholarship,” Debra Mathews and her colleagues want to apply to bioethics various translational concepts developed for biomedical research. According to experts in translational science, this would mean evaluating not only the extent to which research produces the “changes in thinking, practice, and policy” that interest Mathews et al. but also the appropriateness of bioethics training and the level of competency of people working in the field. Their proposal (...)
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  30.  34
    No “Shared Governance” Without Attention to Law, Broadly Conceived.Alexander M. Capron & Sofia Gruskin - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (10):54-56.
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  31.  17
    Omnipotence and Impotence: The Need for Conversation When Patients and Clinicians Disagree.Alexander M. Capron - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (8):28-29.
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  32.  21
    Addressing an ethical dilemma dialogically rather than (merely) logically.Alexander M. Capron - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):36 – 39.
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  33.  4
    On Not Taking “Yes” for an Answer.Alexander M. Capron - 2015 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 26 (2):104-107.
    Does the practice of questioning the decision-making capacity of patients who disagree with recommended medical interventions amount to paternalism on the part of physicians who would not have raised questions about competence had these patients accepted the recommendation? Brudney and Siegler provide a nuanced argument why the practice can be both pragmatically and ethically justifiable, particularly if physicians follow a “decision tree” that they recommend for cases where disagreements occur. Nonetheless, the history of this subject shows that bioethicists have long (...)
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  34. Human Genome Research in an Interdependent World.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (3):247-251.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Human Genome Research in an Interdependent WorldAlexander Morgan Capron (bio)This has been the year of agenda-setting conferences for the ambitious ELSI (ethical, legal and social issues) program of the Human Genome Project (HGP). But of the dozen or more major meetings of this sort held across the country, the one held at the National Institutes of Heakh (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, June 2-4, 1991, was distinctive in several respects.1As (...)
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  35.  26
    Defining Death: Which Way?James L. Bernat, Charles M. Culver, Bernard Gert, Alexander M. Capron & Joanne Lynn - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (2):43.
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  36.  6
    A Concluding, and Possibly Final, Exchange about "Therapy" and "Research".Alexander M. Capron - 1982 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 4 (1):10.
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  37.  15
    At Law: Even in Defeat, Proposition 161 Sounds a Warning.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (1):32.
  38.  28
    At Law: Liberty, Equality, Death!Alexander Morgan Capron - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (3):23.
  39.  27
    Death and the Court.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (5):25-29.
  40.  24
    Privacy: Dead and Gone?Alexander Morgan Capron - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (1):43-45.
  41.  31
    Punishing Mothers.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (1):31-33.
  42.  26
    Substituting Our Judgment.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (2):58-59.
  43.  30
    The Burden of Decision.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (3):36-41.
    The good reasons for judicial intervention in some bioethics cases do not mean that physicians, administrators, and families should routinely seek to shift the burden of decision to the courts.
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  44. Good Intentions.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (2):26-27.
  45.  24
    Oregon's Disability Principles or Politics?Alexander Morgan Capron - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 22 (6):18-20.
  46.  16
    Bette Anton, MLS, is the Head Librarian of the Optometry Library/Health Sciences Information Service. This library serves the University of California at Berkeley–University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program and the University of California at Berkeley School of Optometry.Solomon R. Benatar, Susan S. Braithwaite, Alexander Morgan Capron, Ruth Chadwick, Joseph C. D’Oronzio, Susan Dorr Goold, Kenneth V. Iserson, Roger L. Jackson & Greg S. Loeben - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9:446-447.
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  47.  8
    Advance Directives.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1998 - In Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (eds.), A Companion to Bioethics. Malden, Mass., USA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 299–311.
    This chapter contains sections titled: What Are Advance Directives and Why Do We Have Them? The Origins, and Limitations, of the “Living Will” Legislatively Authorized “Instruction Directives” Legislatively Authorized “Appointment Directives” Advance Directives Outside the United States Conceptual Problems and Practical Difficulties Barriers Remaining to the Effective Use of Advance Directives References Further reading.
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  48.  5
    Between Doctor and Patient.Alexander Morgan Capron - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 26 (5):23-24.
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  49.  7
    At Law: Death and the Court.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (5):25.
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  50.  7
    At Law: Duty, Truth, and Whole Human Beings.Alexander Morgan Capron - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (4):13.
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