8 found
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  1.  11
    Disability, Dialogue, and the Posthuman.Ellen Saur & Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (6):567-578.
    This article is the result of a mutual interest in the radical philosophical dialogue discussed by Martin Buber. The radical dialogue is rooted in western European values of humanism, values that are challenged because they exclude women, people with disabilities, non-western, indigenous people and sexual minorities. With our basis in radical dialogue we are discussing flaws within the very concept of dialogue, how dialogue is challenged in encounters between people with severe disabilities and their helpers, and we are proposing a (...)
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  2.  20
    Human Capital and the Labor of Learning: A Case of Mistaken Identity.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2007 - Educational Theory 57 (2):159-170.
    In this essay, Alexander Sidorkin offers a conceptual critique of the human capital theory that makes erroneous assumptions about the nature of student work and the private cost of schooling. Specifically, human capital theorists underestimate the private cost of schooling by taking low‐level manual labor as the basis for estimating students’ forgone earnings. This does not take into consideration the nature of students’ labor of learning. In the essay, Sidorkin describes student work as a form of labor, not an investment (...)
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  3.  13
    Carnival and Domination: Pedagogies of Neither Care nor Justice.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 1997 - Educational Theory 47 (2):229-238.
  4.  71
    On the Essence of Education.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):521-527.
    Educational reforms in developed countries are not successful, because we do not have a clear understanding of what is education. The essence of education is the limits of its improvement. Education is understood as the artificial extension of human ability to learn, as the product of learner's own efforts, and finally, as a series of historic forms of labor arrangements.
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  5.  24
    Mad Hatters, Jackbooted Managers, and the Massification of Higher Education.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2012 - Educational Theory 62 (4):487-500.
    In this review of three recent books on higher education, Alexander Sidorkin shows how the disinterested discourse that appears to be anticapitalist and anticommercial is actually a way of obtaining income from state subsidies. What links the books under review—Cary Nelson's No University Is an Island: Saving Academic Freedom, Frank Donoghue's The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities, and Jennifer Washburn's University, Inc.: The Corporate Corruption of Higher Education—is their critical evaluation of the corporatization and (...)
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  6.  80
    Student Labor and Evolution of Education.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2004 - World Futures 60 (3):183 – 193.
    The evolution of teaching is examined in three stages: apprenticeship, classical schooling, and mass schooling. All three stages use different social technologies to operate. The mass schooling is analyzed from the point of view of economic anthropology developed by Karl Polanyi, as a non-market economic system. Mass schooling uses the forms of motivation found in archaic, tribal economies: students do their homework and attend school out of considerations of reciprocity. Schools must be treated differently with respect to their improvement. School (...)
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  7.  18
    In the Event of Learning: Alienation and Participative Thinking in Education.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2004 - Educational Theory 54 (3):251-262.
    This essay begins with Karl Marx's notion of alienation, and then explores a form of alienation specific to education. It examines Mikhail Bakhtin's treatment of alienation in connection with his participative thinking theory and suggests strategies for overcoming educational alienation that are based on Bakhtin's notion of the “eventness of Being.” The essay addresses the limitations of liberal and conservative critiques of education, both of which tend to ignore forms of alienation characteristic of modern schooling regardless of the issues of (...)
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  8.  34
    Response to Frank Margonis’ Review of Labor of Learning: Market and the Next Generation of Educational Reform.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (6):577-578.