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  1.  11
    The Politics of Feeling.Alexandra Morrison - 2020 - Symposium 24 (2):144-167.
    The work of Sara Ahmed and Judith Butler exemplifies a recent concern with the politics of affect. Their distinctive contributions are informed by phenomenological accounts of passivity and agency. They view affect as critical to the articulation of social and political space, as well as to the individuation of embodied agents; for each, affect is key to an account of critical engagement. Their at-tention to affective economies also reflects their concern with the dynamics of exclusion, concealment, and marginalization, and thus (...)
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  2.  24
    Rescuing politics from liberalism: Butler and Mouffe on affectivity and the place of ethics.Alexandra Morrison - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 44 (5):528-549.
    Both Judith Butler and Chantal Mouffe challenge liberal conceptions of politics based on their ontological descriptions of the political. Mouffe argues that the failure of liberalism to grasp the agonistic character of political life means that properly political conflicts get translated into moral terms. Mouffe thinks that the way to correct our “post-political” problems is to avoid translating political conflicts into a moral register. I challenge Mouffe’s separation of ethics and politics by invoking Butler’s more nuanced account of the ethical (...)
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  3.  23
    The Voice of Ambiguity: Simone de Beauvoir's Literary and Phenomenological Echoes.Alexandra Morrison & Laura Zebuhr - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (2):418-433.
    In this essay we investigate several moments in Simone de Beauvoir's philosophical and literary texts in which she refers to echoes and echoing. We notice that echoes help Beauvoir to figure and amplify the ethical character of her concept of ambiguity, which is so central to her thought. We argue that, for Beauvoir, literature has privileged access to the ambiguity of existence and therefore maintains a special status in exposing us to alterity and bringing us face to face with ethical (...)
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