Results for 'Alison A. Springle'

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  1.  9
    Phenomenology: What’s AI got to do with it?Alessandra Buccella & Alison A. Springle - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-16.
    Nowadays, philosophers and scientists tend to agree that, even though human and artificial intelligence work quite differently, they can still illuminate aspects of each other, and knowledge in one domain can inspire progress in the other. For instance, the notion of “artificial” or “synthetic” phenomenology has been gaining some traction in recent AI research. In this paper, we ask the question: what is the use of thinking about phenomenology in the context of AI, and in particular machine learning? We will (...)
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  2.  37
    Methods, Minds, Memory, and Kinds.Alison Springle - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (5):635-661.
    ABSTRACTThe acquisition of a skill, or knowledge-how, on the one hand, and the acquisition of a piece of propositional knowledge on the other, appear to be different sorts of epistemic achievements. Does this difference lie in the nature of the knowledge involved, marking a joint between knowledge-how and propositional knowledge? Intellectualists say no: All knowledge is propositional knowledge. Anti-intellectualists say yes: Knowledge-how and propositional knowledge are different in kind. What resources or methods may we legitimately and fruitfully employ to adjudicate (...)
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  3. Perception, Representation, Realism, and Function.Alison Ann Springle - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (5):1202-1213.
    According to orthodox representationalism, perceptual states have constitutive veridicality or accuracy conditions. In defense of this view, several philosophers—most notably Tyler Burge—employ a realist strategy that turns on the purported explanatory ineliminability of representational posits in perceptual science. I argue that Burge’s version of the realist strategy fails as a defense of orthodox representationalism. However, it may vindicate a different kind of representationalism.
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  4.  14
    Anti-Intellectualism, Instructive Representations, and the Intentional Action Argument.Alison Ann Springle & Justin Humphreys - 2021 - Synthese (3-4):7919-7955.
    Intellectualists hold that knowledge-how is a species of knowledge-that, and consequently that the knowledge involved in skill is propositional. In support of this view, the intentional action argument holds that since skills manifest in intentional action and since intentional action necessarily depends on propositional knowledge, skills necessarily depend on propositional knowledge. We challenge this argument, and suggest that instructive representations, as opposed to propositional attitudes, can better account for an agent’s reasons for action. While a propositional-causal theory of action, according (...)
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  5.  80
    Agency, Perception, Space and Subjectivity.Rick Grush & Alison Springle - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (5):799-818.
    The goal of this paper is to illuminate the connections between agency, perception, subjectivity, space and the body. Such connections have been the subject matter of much philosophical work. For example, the importance of the body and bodily action on perception is a growth area in philosophy of mind. Nevertheless, there are some key relations that, as will become clear, have not been adequately explored. We start by examining the relation between embodiment and agency, especially the dependence of agency on (...)
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  6.  20
    Agency, Perception, Space and Subjectivity.Rick Grush & Alison Springle - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (5):799-818.
    The goal of this paper is to illuminate the connections between agency, perception, subjectivity, space and the body. Such connections have been the subject matter of much philosophical work. For example, the importance of the body and bodily action on perception is a growth area in philosophy of mind. Nevertheless, there are some key relations that, as will become clear, have not been adequately explored. We start by examining the relation between embodiment and agency, especially the dependence of agency on (...)
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  7.  27
    The Method of Cases in Context. [REVIEW]Alison Springle - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (4):597-608.
    Volume 27, Issue 4, October 2019, Page 597-608.
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  8. Desperate Technologists: Critical Issues in E-Learning and Implications for Higher Education.Alison A. Carr-Chellman - 2006 - Journal of Thought 41 (1):95.
     
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  9. Technologists.Alison A. Carr-Chellman - 2006 - Journal of Thought 41:1.
     
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  10. Discussion of John McDowell's “Perceptual Experience and Empirical Rationality”.David de Bruijn, Charles Goldhaber, Andrea Kern, John McDowell, Declan Smithies, Alison Springle & Bosuk Yoon - 2018 - Analytic Philosophy 59 (1):99-111.
  11.  3
    A Community of Practice Approach to Enhancing Academic Integrity Policy Translation: A Case Study.Alison Lockley, Amanda Janssen, Penelope A. S. Wurm & Alison Kay Reedy - 2021 - International Journal for Educational Integrity 17 (1).
    IntroductionAcademic integrity policy that is inaccessible, ambiguous or confusing is likely to result in inconsistent policy enactment. Additionally, policy analysis and development are often undertaken as top down processes requiring passive acceptance by users of policy that has been developed outside the context in which it is enacted. Both these factors can result in poor policy uptake, particularly where policy users are overworked, intellectually critical and capable, not prone to passive acceptance and hold valuable grass roots intelligence about policy enactment.Case (...)
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  12.  10
    Development of a Bundle Measure for Preventive Service Delivery to Infants in Primary Care.Courtney M. Brown, Zeina M. Samaan, John F. Morehous, Alison A. Perkins, Robert S. Kahn & Mona E. Mansour - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (4):642-648.
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  13.  57
    Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility.Alison McIntyre - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (2):267.
    John Fischer and Mark Ravizza defend in this book a painstakingly constructed analysis of what they take to be a core condition of moral responsibility: the notion of guidance control. The volume usefully collects in one place ideas and arguments the authors have previously published in singly or jointly authored works on this and related topics, as well as various refinements to those views and some suggestive discussions that aim to show how their account of guidance control might fit into (...)
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  14. A Theory of Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, Laura Schulz, Tamar Kushnir & David Danks - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (1):3-32.
    We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent, learned representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously understood in terms of the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Children’s causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learning causal Bayes nets and for predicting with them. Experimental results suggest that 2- to 4-year-old children (...)
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  15.  36
    A Social Actor Conception of Organizational Identity and its Implications for the Study of Organizational Reputation.David A. Whetten & Alison Mackey - 2002 - Business and Society 41 (4):393-414.
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  16. A Plurality of Pluralisms: Collaborative Practice in Archaeology.Alison Wylie - 2015 - In Jonathan Y. Tsou, Alan Richardson & Flavia Padovani (eds.), Objectivity in Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 189-210.
    Innovative modes of collaboration between archaeologists and Indigenous communities are taking shape in a great many contexts, in the process transforming conventional research practice. While critics object that these partnerships cannot but compromise the objectivity of archaeological science, many of the archaeologists involved argue that their research is substantially enriched by them. I counter objections raised by internal critics and crystalized in philosophical terms by Boghossian, disentangling several different kinds of pluralism evident in these projects and offering an analysis of (...)
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  17.  91
    Discussion of Susanna Siegel's “Can Perceptual Experiences Be Rational?”.Ori Beck, Mazviita Chirimuuta, T. Raja Rosenhagen, Susanna Siegel, Declan Smithies & Alison Springle - 2018 - Analytic Philosophy 59 (1):175-190.
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  18. Why the Child’s Theory of Mind Really Is a Theory.Alison Gopnik & Henry M. Wellman - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):145-71.
  19.  14
    What Explains Associations of Researchers’ Nation of Origin and Scores on a Measure of Professional Decision-Making? Exploring Key Variables and Interpretation of Scores.Alison L. Antes, Tammy English, Kari A. Baldwin & James M. DuBois - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1499-1530.
    Researchers encounter challenges that require making complex professional decisions. Strategies such as seeking help and anticipating consequences support decision-making in these situations. Existing evidence on a measure of professional decision-making in research that assesses the use of decision-making strategies revealed that NIH-funded researchers born outside of the U.S. tended to score below their U.S. counterparts. To examine potential explanations for this association, this study recruited 101 researchers born in the United States and 102 born internationally to complete the PDR and (...)
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  20.  56
    A Computational Foundation for Cognitive Development: Comment on Griffths Et Al. And McLelland Et Al.Alison Gopnik, Henry M. Wellman, Susan A. Gelman & Andrew N. Meltzoff - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):342-343.
  21.  87
    In Conversation: Ruth Macklin, Alison Reiheld, Robyn Bluhm, Sidney Callahan, and Frances Kissling Discuss the Marlise Munoz Case, Advance Directives, and Pregnant Women.Ruth Macklin, Alison Reiheld, Robyn Bluhm, Sidney Callahan & Frances Kissling - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (1):156-167.
    Feminist bioethicists of a variety of persuasions discuss the 2013 case of Marlise Munoz, a pregnant woman whose medical care was in dispute after she became brain dead.
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  22.  39
    A Plea for KR.Alison Duncan Kerr - 2019 - Synthese 198 (4):3047-3071.
    There is a strong case to be made for thinking that an obscure logic, KR, is better than classical logic and better than any relevant logic. The argument for KR over relevant logics is that KR counts disjunctive syllogism valid, and this is the biggest complaint about relevant logics. The argument for KR over classical logic depends on the normativity of logic and the paradoxes of implication. The paradoxes of implication are taken by relevant logicians to justify relevant logic, but (...)
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  23. Rethinking Unity as a "Working Hypothesis" for Philosophy: How Archaeologists Exploit the Disunities of Science.Alison Wylie - 1999 - Perspectives on Science 7 (3):293-317.
    As a working hypothesis for philosophy of science, the unity of science thesis has been decisively challenged in all its standard formulations; it cannot be assumed that the sciences presuppose an orderly world, that they are united by the goal of systematically describing and explaining this order, or that they rely on distinctively scientific methodologies which, properly applied, produce domain-specific results that converge on a single coherent and comprehensive system of knowledge. I first delineate the scope of arguments against global (...)
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  24. A Meta-Analytic Investigation of Business Ethics Instruction.Ethan P. Waples, Alison L. Antes, Stephen T. Murphy, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):133-151.
    The education of students and professionals in business ethics is an increasingly important goal on the agenda of business schools and corporations. The present study provides a meta-analysis of 25 previously conducted business ethics instructional programs. The role of criteria, study design, participant characteristics, quality of instruction, instructional content, instructional program characteristics, and characteristics of instructional methods as moderators of the effectiveness of business ethics instruction were examined. Overall, results indicate that business ethics instructional programs have a minimal␣impact on increasing (...)
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  25.  2
    Planning a Family in Nairobi’s Informal Settlements: Results of a Qualitative Study.Catriona A. Towriss, Donatien Beguy, Alison Wringe, Barwako Hassan Hussein & Ian M. Timæus - forthcoming - Journal of Biosocial Science:1-14.
    Childbearing intentions among women in high-fertility contexts are usually classified into those wanting to have a baby, those wanting to ‘space’ a birth and those wanting to ‘limit’ their family size. However, evidence from Africa increasingly suggests that women’s intentions are more complex than this classification suggests, and that there is fluidity in these intentions. This research explores women’s accounts of their childbearing intentions and decisions in order to examine how this fluidity plays out in a low-fertility context in urban (...)
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  26.  24
    Good Deeds and Misdeeds: A Mediated Model of the Effect of Corporate Social Performance on Organizational Attractiveness.Rebecca A. Luce, Alison E. Barber & Amy J. Hillman - 2001 - Business and Society 40 (4):397-415.
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  27.  1
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Publicness, Social Justice, and Education; a South-North Conversation.Marek Tesar, Michael A. Peters, Robert Hattam, Leah O’Toole, Lester-Irabinna Rigney, Kathryn Paige, Suzanne O’Keeffe, Hannah Soong, Carl Anders Säfström, Jenni Carter, Alison Wrench, Deirdre Forde, Sam Osborne, Lotar Rasiński, Hana Cervinkova, Kathleen Heugh & Gert Biesta - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (8):1216-1233.
    Public education is not just a way to organise and fund education. It is also the expression of a particular ideal about education and of a particular way to conceive of the relationship between education and society. The ideal of public education sees education as an important dimension of the common good and as an important institution in securing the common good. The common good is never what individuals or particular groups want or desire, but always reaches beyond such particular (...)
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  28. Reconceiving Surrogacy: Toward a Reproductive Justice Account of Indian Surrogacy.Alison Bailey - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):715-741.
    My project here is to argue for situating moral judgments about Indian surrogacy in the context of Reproductive Justice. I begin by crafting the best picture of Indian surrogacy available to me while marking some worries I have about discursive colonialism and epistemic honesty. Western feminists' responses to contract pregnancy fall loosely into two interrelated moments: post-Baby M discussions that focus on the morality of surrogacy work in Western contexts, and feminist biomedical ethnographies that focus on the lived dimensions of (...)
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  29.  67
    Does the Temporal Asymmetry of Value Support a Tensed Metaphysics?Alison Fernandes - 2021 - Synthese 198 (5):3999-4016.
    There are temporal asymmetries in our attitudes towards the past and future. For example, we judge that a given amount of work is worth twice as much if it is described as taking place in the future, compared to the past :796–801, 2008). Does this temporal value asymmetry support a tensed metaphysics? By getting clear on the asymmetry’s features, I’ll argue that it doesn’t. To support a tensed metaphysics, the value asymmetry would need to not vary with temporal distance, apply (...)
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  30.  28
    The Role of Culture and Acculturation in Researchers’ Perceptions of Rules in Science.Alison L. Antes, Tammy English, Kari A. Baldwin & James M. DuBois - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (2):361-391.
    Successfully navigating the norms of a society is a complex task that involves recognizing diverse kinds of rules as well as the relative weight attached to them. In the United States, different kinds of rules—federal statutes and regulations, scientific norms, and professional ideals—guide the work of researchers. Penalties for violating these different kinds of rules and norms can range from the displeasure of peers to criminal sanctions. We proposed that it would be more difficult for researchers working in the U.S. (...)
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  31.  7
    Use of Financial Incentives and Text Message Feedback to Increase Healthy Food Purchases in a Grocery Store Cash Back Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.Anjali Gopalan, Pamela A. Shaw, Raymond Lim, Jithen Paramanund, Deepak Patel, Jingsan Zhu, Kevin G. Volpp & Alison M. Buttenheim - 2019 - BMC Public Health 19 (1):674.
    The HealthyFood program offers members up to 25% cash back monthly on healthy food purchases. In this randomized controlled trial, we tested the efficacy of financial incentives combined with text messages in increasing healthy food purchases among HF members. Members receiving the lowest cash back level were randomized to one of six arms: Arm 1 : 10% cash back, no weekly text, standard monthly text; Arm 2: 10% cash back, generic weekly text, standard monthly text; Arm 3: 10% cash back, (...)
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  32.  6
    Systematic Review of Research Focused on Pregnant and Postpartum Women Living with HIV: A Relational Ethics Perspective.Alison Z. Weber, Abigail Harrison & Jennifer A. Pellowski - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (8):829-838.
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  33.  70
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Who Remembers Greta Thunberg? Education and Environment After the Coronavirus.Petar Jandrić, Jimmy Jaldemark, Zoe Hurley, Brendan Bartram, Adam Matthews, Michael Jopling, Julia Mañero, Alison MacKenzie, Jones Irwin, Ninette Rothmüller, Benjamin Green, Shane J. Ralston, Olli Pyyhtinen, Sarah Hayes, Jake Wright, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (14):1421-1441.
    This paper explores relationships between environment and education after the Covid-19 pandemic through the lens of philosophy of education in a new key developed by Michael Peters and the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia. The paper is collectively written by 15 authors who responded to the question: Who remembers Greta Thunberg? Their answers are classified into four main themes and corresponding sections. The first section, ‘As we bake the earth, let's try and bake it from scratch’, gathers wider philosophical (...)
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  34. Towards a Genealogical Feminism: A Reading of Judith Butler's Political Thought.Alison Stone - 2005 - Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):4-24.
    Judith Butler's contribution to feminist political thought is usually approached in terms of her concept of performativity, according to which gender exists only insofar as it is ritualistically and repetitively performed, creating permanent possibilities for performing gender in new and transgressive ways. In this paper, I argue that Butler's politics of performativity is more fundamentally grounded in the concept of genealogy, which she adapts from Foucault and, ultimately, Nietzsche. Butler understands women to have a genealogy: to be located within a (...)
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  35.  30
    The Humane Imperative: A Moral Opportunity.Kimberly A. Urie, Alison Stanley & Jerold D. Friedman - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):20 – 21.
  36.  2
    A public health framework for reducing stigma: the example of weight stigma.Alison Harwood, Drew Carter & Jaklin Eliott - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (3):511-520.
    We examine stigma and how it operates, then develop a novel framework to classify the range of positions that are conceptually possible regarding how stigma ought to be handled from a public health perspective. In the case of weight stigma, the possible positions range from encouraging the intentional use of weight stigma as an obesity prevention and reduction strategy to arguing not only that this is harmful but that weight stigma, independent of obesity, needs to be actively challenged and reduced. (...)
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  37.  38
    Feminist, Queer, Crip.Alison Kafer - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    In Feminist, Queer, Crip Alison Kafer imagines a different future for disability and disabled bodies. Challenging the ways in which ideas about the future and time have been deployed in the service of compulsory able-bodiedness and able-mindedness, Kafer rejects the idea of disability as a pre-determined limit. She juxtaposes theories, movements, and identities such as environmental justice, reproductive justice, cyborg theory, transgender politics, and disability that are typically discussed in isolation and envisions new possibilities for crip futures and feminist/queer/crip (...)
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  38.  23
    Development and Preliminary Validation of a New Measure of Values in Scientific Work.Tammy English, Alison L. Antes, Kari A. Baldwin & James M. DuBois - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (2):393-418.
    In this paper we describe the development and initial psychometric evaluation of a new measure, the values in scientific work. This scale assesses the level of importance that investigators attach to different VSW. It taps a broad range of intrinsic, extrinsic, and social values that motivate the work of scientists, including values specific to scientific work and more classic work values in the context of science. Notably, the values represented in this scale are relevant to scientists regardless of their career (...)
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  39.  1
    The Unbearable Limitations of Solo Science: Team Science as a Path for More Rigorous and Relevant Research.Alison Ledgerwood, Cynthia Pickett, Danielle Navarro, Jessica D. Remedios & Neil A. Lewis - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    Both early social psychologists and the modern, interdisciplinary scientific community have advocated for diverse team science. We echo this call and describe three common pitfalls of solo science illustrated by the target article. We discuss how a collaborative and inclusive approach to science can both help researchers avoid these pitfalls and pave the way for more rigorous and relevant research.
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  40.  12
    The “Ought-Is” Problem: An Implementation Science Framework for Translating Ethical Norms Into Practice.Bryan A. Sisk, Jessica Mozersky, Alison L. Antes & James M. DuBois - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):62-70.
    We argue that once a normative claim is developed, there is an imperative to effect changes based on this norm. As such, ethicists should adopt an “implementation mindset” when formulating...
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  41. A Computational Model Of Lakatos-Style Reasoning.Alison Pease - 2013 - Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal 27.
     
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  42.  11
    Contingency and Individuality: A Plurality of Evolutionary Individuality Types.Alison K. McConwell - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1104-1116.
    Recently, philosophers have sought to determine the nature of individuals relevant to evolution by natural selection or evolutionary individuals. The Evolutionary Contingency Thesis is a claim about evolution that emphasizes the role of contingency or dependency relations and chance-based factors in how evolution unfolds. In this article, I argue that if we take evolutionary contingency seriously, then we should be pluralists about the types of individuals in selection.
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  43. Caring as a Feminist Practice of Moral Reason.Alison M. Jaggar - 1995 - In Virginia Held (ed.), Justice and Care: Essential Readings in Feminist Ethics. Westview Press. pp. 179--202.
  44.  2
    Systematic Review of Research Focused on Pregnant and Postpartum Women Living with HIV: A Relational Ethics Perspective.Alison Z. Weber, Abigail Harrison & Jennifer A. Pellowski - forthcoming - Wiley: Bioethics.
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  45.  21
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Future of Philosophy of Education.Liz Jackson, MichaelA Peters, Lei Chen, Zhongjing Huang, Wang Chengbing, Ezekiel Dixon-Román, Aislinn O'Donnell, Yasushi Maruyama, Lisa A. Mazzei, Alison Jones, Candace R. Kuby, Rowena Azada-Palacios, Elizabeth Adams St Pierre, Jacoba Matapo, Gina A. Opiniano, Peter Roberts, Michael Hand, Alecia Y. Jackson, Jerry Rosiek, Te Kawehau Hoskins, Kathy Hytten & Marek Tesar - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (8):1234-1255.
    What is the future of Philosophy of education? Or as many of scholars and thinkers in this final ‘future-focused’ collective piece from the philosophy of education in a new key Series put it, what are the futures—plural and multiple—of the intersections of ‘philosophy’ and ‘education?’ What is ‘Philosophy’; and what is ‘Education’, and what role may ‘enquiry’ play? Is the future of education and philosophy embracing—or at least taking seriously—and thinking with Indigenous ethicoontoepistemologies? And, perhaps most importantly, what is that (...)
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  46. “The Event That Was Nothing”: Miscarriage as a Liminal Event.Alison Reiheld - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):9-26.
    I argue that miscarriage, referred to by poet Susan Stewart as “the event that was nothing,” is a liminal event along four distinct and inter-related dimensions: parenthood, procreation, death, and induced abortion. It is because of this liminality that miscarriage has been both poorly addressed in our society, and enrolled in larger debates over women's reproduction and responsibility for reproduction, both conceptually and legally. If miscarriage’s liminality were better understood, if miscarriage itself were better theorized, perhaps it would not so (...)
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  47.  43
    A Companion to Feminist Philosophy.Alison M. Jaggar & Iris Young (eds.) - 1998 - Blackwell.
  48. A Feminist Critique of the Alleged Southern Debt.Alison M. Jaggar - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):119-142.
    Neoliberal globalization has deepened the impoverishment and marginalization of many women. This system is maintained by the debt supposedly owed by many poor nations in the global South to a few rich nations in the global North, because the obligation to service the debt traps the people of the South within an economic order that severely disadvantages them. I offer several reasons for thinking that many of these alleged debt obligations are not morally binding, especially on Southern women.
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  49.  23
    Smartphone Applications Utilizing Biofeedback Can Aid Stress Reduction.Alison Dillon, Mark Kelly, Ian H. Robertson & Deirdre A. Robertson - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  50. Introduction: When Difference Makes a Difference.Alison Wylie - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):1-7.
    Taking seriously the social dimensions of knowledge puts pressure on the assumption that epistemic agents can usefully be thought of as autonomous, interchangeable individuals, capable, insofar as they are rational and objective, of transcending the specificities of personal history, experience, and context. If this idealization is abandoned as the point of departure for epistemic inquiry, then differences among situated knowers come sharply into focus. These include differences in cognitive capacity, experience, and expertise; in access to information and the heuristics that (...)
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