Results for 'Alistair I. Mcfadyen'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. The Joy of Being Wrong: Original Sin Through Easter Eyes.James Alison, Alistair I. Mcfadyen, Andrew Sung Park, Ted Peters & Solomon Schimmel - 2001 - Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):471-501.
    Reviewing works by James Alison, Alistair McFadyen, Andrew Sung Park, Ted Peters, and Solomon Schimmel, the author suggests that the status and function of the discourse/doctrine of sin highlight tensions between theology and ethics in ways that suggest the character, limits, and promise of religious ethics. This literature commends attention to sin-talk because it helps religious ethicists to render more adequately the dynamics of human agency, sociality, and culture and because it raises questions about the nature and task (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  2.  56
    Imaging God: A Theological Answer to the Anthropological Question?Alistair McFadyen - 2012 - Zygon 47 (4):918-933.
    Traditionally the central trope in Christian theological anthropology, “the image of God” tends to function more as a noun than a verb. While that has grounded significant interplay between specific Christian formulations and the concepts of nontheological disciplines and cultural constructs, it facilitates the withdrawal of the image and of theological anthropology more broadly from the context of active relation with God. Rather than a static rendering of the image a more interactionist, dynamic, and relational view of “imaging God” is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3. Bound to Sin: Abuse, Holocaust and the Christian Doctrine of Sin.Alistair McFadyen - 2000
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  22
    The Ideal Application of Surveillance Technology in Residential Care for People with Dementia.Alistair R. Niemeijer, Brenda J. M. Frederiks, Marja F. I. A. Depla, Johan Legemaate, Jan A. Eefsting & Cees M. P. M. Hertogh - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (5):303-310.
    Background As our society is ageing, nursing homes are finding it increasingly difficult to deal with an expanding population of patients with dementia and a decreasing workforce. A potential answer to this problem might lie in the use of technology. However, the use and application of surveillance technology in dementia care has led to considerable ethical debate among healthcare professionals and ethicists, with no clear consensus to date. Aim To explore how surveillance technology is viewed by care professionals and ethicists (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  6
    Fetal Survival--Who Decides?I. R. McFadyen - 1978 - Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (1):30-31.
    In this paper Iain McFadyen highlights a modern ethical dilemma. In each case the fetus was recognised to be in danger, but in both cases the advice given in the fetal interest was refused by the mothers. Both the mother and the physician were concerned for the fetus, but their differing actions and reasons pose the dilemma--who decides?
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  16
    Realism Without Tears I: Müller’s Doctrine of Specific Nerve Energies.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 78:83-92.
    The Doctrine of Specific Nerve Energies has been and continues to be enormously influential in the physiology, psychology, and philosophy of perception. In simple terms, the Doctrine states that we directly perceive in the first instance the activity of our nerves, rather than properties in the external world. The canonical early statement of the Doctrine by the physiologist Johannes Peter Müller had profound influence on both the phi- losophy and psychology of the 19th and early 20th centuries, especially as reformulated (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  32
    Models of Arithmetic and Upper Bounds for Arithmetic Sets.Alistair H. Lachlan & Robert I. Soare - 1994 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 59 (3):977-983.
    We settle a question in the literature about degrees of models of true arithmetic and upper bounds for the arithmetic sets. We prove that there is a model of true arithmetic whose degree is not a uniform upper bound for the arithmetic sets. The proof involves two forcing constructions.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Review Articles : Forgiveness and Truth: Explorations in Contemporary Theology, Edited by Alistair McFadyen and Marcel Sarot. Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 2001. 240 Pp. Pb. £19.99. ISBN 0-567-08777-8. Forgiveness and Revenge, by Trudy Govier. London: Routledge, 2002. 205 Pp. Pb. £13.99. ISBN 0-415-27856-2. On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness, by Jacques Derrida. London: Routledge, 2001. 60 Pp. Pb. £7.99. ISBN 0-415-22712-7. [REVIEW]John Hughes - 2003 - Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (1):79-86.
  9.  14
    The Continuity of Cupping to 0'.Klaus Ambos-Spies, Alistair H. Lachlan & Robert I. Soare - 1993 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 64 (3):195-209.
    It is shown that, if a, b are recursively enumerable degrees such that 0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10.  63
    Medicalization and Epistemic Injustice.Alistair Wardrope - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):341-352.
    Many critics of medicalization express concern that the process privileges individualised, biologically grounded interpretations of medicalized phenomena, inhibiting understanding and communication of aspects of those phenomena that are less relevant to their biomedical modelling. I suggest that this line of critique views medicalization as a hermeneutical injustice—a form of epistemic injustice that prevents people having the hermeneutical resources available to interpret and communicate significant areas of their experience. Interpreting the critiques in this fashion shows they frequently fail because they: neglect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  11. Therapeutic Cloning: The Ethical Road to Regulation. Part I: Arguments For and Against & Regulations.Alistair Brown - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):75-86.
    In analysing the position adopted by the United Kingdom over therapeutic cloning, this paper will endeavour to examine the question of regulation, its necessity and extent. This will be achieved through considering different models of relevant theoretical discourse before, in applying that discourse to identified systems of regulation, the advantages and pitfalls of each system will be assessed in the hope of reaching a solution appropriate to the sensitive, yet dynamic, needs of the issue.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  5
    Christian Truth and the Pseudo-Dialectical Methodology of Alistair McFadyen.Michael P. Wilson - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 81 (2):155-173.
    At the heart of this essay lies the problem of Christian universals.Sin-talk is arguably Christian theology’s primary contribution to any account of the human condition. Fashionable or unfashionabl...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  37
    The D.R.E. Degrees Are Not Dense.S. Barry Cooper, Leo Harrington, Alistair H. Lachlan, Steffen Lempp & Robert I. Soare - 1991 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 55 (2):125-151.
    By constructing a maximal incomplete d.r.e. degree, the nondensity of the partial order of the d.r.e. degrees is established. An easy modification yields the nondensity of the n-r.e. degrees and of the ω-r.e. degrees.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  14. Objective Similarity and Mental Representation.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):683-704.
    The claim that similarity plays a role in representation has been philosophically discredited. Psychologists, however, routinely analyse the success of mental representations for guiding behaviour in terms of a similarity between representation and the world. I provide a foundation for this practice by developing a philosophically responsible account of the relationship between similarity and representation in natural systems. I analyse similarity in terms of the existence of a suitable homomorphism between two structures. The key insight is that by restricting attention (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  15.  72
    The Semantics Latent in Shannon Information.M. C. Isaac Alistair - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (1):103-125.
    The lore is that standard information theory provides an analysis of information quantity, but not of information content. I argue this lore is incorrect, and there is an adequate informational semantics latent in standard theory. The roots of this notion of content can be traced to the secret parallel development of an information theory equivalent to Shannon’s by Turing at Bletchley Park, and it has been suggested independently in recent work by Skyrms and Bullinaria and Levy. This paper explicitly articulates (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  16.  20
    Does Clinical Ethics Need a Land Ethic?Alistair Wardrope - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):531-543.
    A clinical ethics fit for the Anthropocene—our current geological era in which human activity is the primary determinant of environmental change—needs to incorporate environmental ethics to be fit for clinical practice. Conservationist Aldo Leopold’s essay ‘The Land Ethic’ is probably the most widely-cited source in environmental philosophy; but Leopold’s work, and environmental ethics generally, has made little impression on clinical ethics. The Land Ethic holds that “A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  69
    Models of Arithmetic and Subuniform Bounds for the Arithmetic Sets.Alistair H. Lachlan & Robert I. Soare - 1998 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (1):59-72.
    It has been known for more than thirty years that the degree of a non-standard model of true arithmetic is a subuniform upper bound for the arithmetic sets. Here a notion of generic enumeration is presented with the property that the degree of such an enumeration is an suub but not the degree of a non-standard model of true arithmetic. This answers a question posed in the literature.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  37
    Prospects for Timbre Physicalism.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (2):503-529.
    Timbre is that property of a sound that distinguishes it other than pitch and loudness, for instance the distinctive sound quality of a violin or flute. While the term is obscure, the concept has played an important, implicit role in recent philosophy of sound. Philosophers have debated whether to identify sounds with properties of waves, events, or objects. Many of the intuitive considerations in this debate apply most clearly to timbre qualities. Two prominent forms of timbre physicalism have emerged: one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19. Structural Realism for Secondary Qualities.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (3):481-510.
    This paper outlines and defends a novel position in the color realism debate, namely structural realism. This position is novel in that it dissociates the veridicality of color attributions from the claim that physical objects are themselves colored. Thus, it is realist about color in both the semantic and epistemic senses, but not the ontic sense. The generality of this position is demonstrated by applying it to other “secondary qualities,” including heat, musical pitch, and odor. The basic argument proceeds by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  20.  23
    A Poetic Exchange.Alistair Elliot & Richard Stern - 1976 - Critical Inquiry 2 (4):689-691.
    [Alistair Elliot:] Inside the margins of a bookthrough the screen doors of inkyou find yourself among explained peoplewhom you imagine from one clue, or two,people you cannot bore or smell,who will not love you or seduce your friend.They have names out of telephone books—Baggish and Schreiber—but of course they are not real. [Richard Stern:] Dear Mr. Elliot. Or—for these lines anyway—Dear Alistair .I wish I were as fictional as BaggishAnd could answer with impalpable visibility,but here I am, beside (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  15
    Two Theorems on Degrees of Models of True Arithmetic.Julia Knight, Alistair H. Lachlan & Robert I. Soare - 1984 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (2):425-436.
  22.  62
    Authenticity and Autonomy in Deep-Brain Stimulation.Alistair Wardrope - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):563-566.
    Felicitas Kraemer draws on the experiences of patients undergoing deep-brain stimulation to propose two distinct and potentially conflicting principles of respect: for an individual's autonomy , and for their authenticity. I argue instead that, according to commonly-invoked justifications of respect for autonomy, authenticity is itself in part constitutive of an analysis of autonomy worthy of respect; Kraemer's argument thus highlights the shortcomings of practical applications of respect for autonomy that emphasise competence while neglecting other important dimensions of autonomy such as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  23.  21
    Hubris to Humility: Tonal Volume and the Fundamentality of Psychophysical Quantities.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 65:99-111.
    Psychophysics measures the attributes of perceptual experience. The question of whether some of these attributes should be interpreted as more fundamental, or “real,” than others has been answered differently throughout its history. The operationism of Stevens and Boring answers “no,” reacting to the perceived vacuity of earlier debates about fundamentality. The subsequent rise of multidimensional scaling (MDS) implicitly answers “yes” in its insistence that psychophysical data be represented in spaces of low dimensionality. I argue the return of fundamentality follows from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24.  84
    Modeling Without Representation.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2013 - Synthese 190 (16):3611-3623.
    How can mathematical models which represent the causal structure of the world incompletely or incorrectly have any scientific value? I argue that this apparent puzzle is an artifact of a realist emphasis on representation in the philosophy of modeling. I offer an alternative, pragmatic methodology of modeling, inspired by classic papers by modelers themselves. The crux of the view is that models developed for purposes other than explanation may be justified without reference to their representational properties.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25.  14
    Virtue Through Challenge: Moral Development and Self‐Transformation.Alistair Miller - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):785-800.
    In this article, I argue that although the Aristotelian ideal of leading a virtuous life for its own sake is admirable, conventional Aristotelian and neo-Aristotelian accounts of how it might be realised are empirically inadequate: Habituation is unlikely to produce ‘a love of virtue’, practical experience cannot then produce practical judgement or phronesis, and Aristotle's conception of a virtuous life excludes all but an idealised elite. Instead, I argue that two conceptually distinct aspects of moral development can be identified: the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26.  5
    Practices and Morphogenesis.Alistair Mutch - 2017 - Journal of Critical Realism 16 (5):499-513.
    Working within an Archerian morphogenetic framework, I suggest that we need to pay more attention to practices. Instead of the mainstream focus on practice as action, I argue that we should pay attention to practices as a key structural and cultural element of analysis. Practices cannot be simply read-off from beliefs, that is, they are not an inevitable practical counterpart to belief. Although belief is relevant, it does not provide the full explanation for the presence of practices. Therefore, the same (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  12
    Constructing a ‘Revolution in Science’: The Campaign to Promote a Favourable Reception for the 1919 Solar Eclipse Experiments.Alistair Sponsel - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Science 35 (4):439-467.
    A patriot fiddler-composer of LutonWrote a funeral march which he played with the mute on,To record, as he said, that a Jewish-Swiss-TeutonHad partially scrapped the Principia of Newton.Punch, 19 November 1919, p. 422When the results of experiments performed during the British solar eclipse expeditions of 1919 were announced at a joint meeting of the Royal Society and the Royal Astronomical Society, they were celebrated in the next day's Times of London with the famous headline ‘Revolution in science’. This exemplified the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28. Eternity in Kant and Post-Kantian European Thought.Alistair Welchman - 2016 - In Yitzhak Melamed (ed.), Eternity: A History. Oxford, UK: pp. 179-225.
    The story of eternity is not as simple as a secularization narrative implies. Instead it follows something like the trajectory of reversal in Kant’s practical proof for the existence of god. In that proof, god emerges not as an object of theoretical investigation, but as a postulate required by our practical engagement with the world; so, similarly, the eternal is not just secularized out of existence, but becomes understood as an entailment of, and somehow imbricated in, the conditions of our (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  10
    Escape From Zanzibar: The Epistemic Value of Precision in Measurement.Alistair M. C. Isaac - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science:1-14.
    A “Zanzibar” is an island of measurement values that internally cohere, but are detached from independent contact with reality. One manifestation of Zanzibars is through “bandwagon effects,” the tendency of contemporaneous measurements to agree. Bandwagons illustrate how the otherwise virtuous drive towards coherence can have negative epistemic consequences. I argue that precision is an epistemic virtue that mitigates against bandwagon effects and illustrate this claim with a case study from the history of measurements of c. This precision-first reasoning motivates the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Deleuze’s Post-Critical Metaphysics.Alistair Welchman - 2009 - Symposium 13 (2):25-54.
    Badiou claims Deleuze’s thinking is pre-critical metaphysics that cannot be understood in relation to Kant. I argue that Deleuze is indeed a metaphysical thinker, but precisely because he is a kind of Kantian. Badiou is right that Deleuze rejects the overwhelmingly epistemic problematics of critical thought in its classical sense, but he is wrong to claim that Deleuze completely rejects Kant. Instead, Deleuze is interested in developing a metaphysics that prolongs Kant’s conception of a productive synthesis irreducible to empirical causation. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. ‘That is When Justice Becomes Complete.’ Exemplars’ Perspectives on Forgiveness as a Civic Virtue in Post-Genocide Rwanda.Jonathan M. Tirrell, Erin I. Kelly, John Gasasira Gasana, Elizabeth M. Dowling, Julia Dennis, Katelyn Malvese, Elise Rollman, Emmanuel Namurinda, Richard M. Lerner & Alistair T. R. Sim - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Education:1-16.
  32. Schopenhauer’s Two Metaphysics.Alistair Welchman - 2017 - In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Palgrave Schopenhauer Handbook. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 129-149.
    Schopenhauer positions himself squarely within the tradition of Kant’s transcendental idealism, and his first sense of the metaphysical comprises the synthetic cognition a priori that makes experience possible within transcendental idealism. This is Schopenhauer’s transcendental metaphysics. As he developed philosophically however, Schopenhauer devised a second sense of the metaphysical. This second sense also depends, albeit negatively, on transcendental idealism because its central claim—that the thing in itself should be identified with will—looks like precisely a species of transcendent metaphysics, a claim (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  30
    Camus’s Algerian in Paris: A Prose Poetic Reading of L’Étranger.Alistair Rolls - 2011 - Sophia 50 (4):527-541.
    This paper demonstrates that L'Étranger , Camus's famous novel about an outsider, had by as early as 1946 become just as much of an 'insider' in terms of its affiliation to the Parisian literary tradition. More than an insider simply by virtue of its contemporary place in the French canon, then, the novel is also intertextually bound to a tradition of oxymoronic poetics dating back to Charles Baudelaire's Paris Spleen ( Les Petits poèmes en prose ). I shall examine the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  7
    Corrigendum to “The D.R.E. Degrees Are Not Dense” [Ann. Pure Appl. Logic 55 (1991) 125–151].S. Barry Cooper, Leo Harrington, Alistair H. Lachlan, Steffen Lempp & Robert I. Soare - 2017 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 168 (12):2164-2165.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  60
    Model Uncertainty and Policy Choice: A Plea for Integrated Subjectivism.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 47:42-50.
    A question at the intersection of scientific modeling and public choice is how to deal with uncertainty about model predictions. This "high-level" uncertainty is necessarily value-laden, and thus must be treated as irreducibly subjective. Nevertheless, formal methods of uncertainty analysis should still be employed for the purpose of clarifying policy debates. I argue that such debates are best informed by models which integrate objective features with subjective ones. This integrated subjectivism is illustrated with a case study from the literature on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  30
    Scarce Vaccine Supplies in an Influenza Pandemic Should Not Be Distributed Randomly: Reply to McLachlan.Alistair Wardrope - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):765-767.
    In a recent paper, Hugh McLachlan argues from a deontological perspective that the most ethical means of distributing scarce supplies of an effective vaccine in the context of an influenza pandemic would be via an equal lottery. I argue that, even if one accepts McLachlan's ethical theory, it does not follow that one should accept the vaccine lottery. McLachlan's argument relies upon two suppressed premises which, I maintain, one need not accept; and it misconstrues vaccination programmes as clinical interventions targeted (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  19
    Autonomy as Ideology: Towards an Autonomy Worthy of Respect.Alistair Wardrope - 2015 - The New Bioethics 21 (1):56-70.
    Recent criticism of the role of respect for autonomy in bioethics has focused on that principle's status as ‘dogma’ or ‘ideology’. I suggest that lying beneath many applications of respect for autonomy in medical ethics are some influential dogmas — propositions accepted, not as explicit premises or as a consequence of reasoned argument, but simply because moral problems are so frequently framed in such terms. Furthermore, I will argue that rejecting these dogmas is vital to secure and protect an autonomy (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  11
    Liberal Individualism, Relational Autonomy, and the Social Dimension of Respect.Alistair Wardrope - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (1):37-66.
    The principle of respect for autonomy in clinical ethics is frequently linked to bioethics’ neglect of community-level ethical considerations. I argue that the latter is not an inevitable consequence of the former; rather, that neglect results from a common interpretation of respect for autonomy in solely synchronic and individual terms. A relational understanding of autonomy reveals the way in which respect inescapably involves diachronic and social dimensions. When these are acknowledged, the association between respect for autonomy and liberal individualism is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  69
    The Failure of Thomas Reid's Attack on David Hume.Alistair Sinclair - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (2):389 – 398.
    Thomas Reid launched a scathing attack on David Hume in his first book: "An Inquiry into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense" published in 1764. But this was ineffective and his arguments failed to persuade Hume to rethink his philosophy. Till the end of his life Hume remained unconvinced by Reid's criticisms of him. In this paper I examine: (1) what Hume thought of Reid's book, (2) why Hume was unshaken by Reid's arguments against him, (3) whether (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  1
    The Hermeneutics of Symptoms.Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (3):395-412.
    The clinical encounter begins with presentation of an illness experience; but throughout that encounter, something else is constructed from it – a symptom. The symptom is a particular interpretation of that experience, useful for certain purposes in particular contexts. The hermeneutics of medicine – the study of the interpretation of human experience in medical terms – has largely taken the process of symptom-construction to be transparent, focussing instead on how constellations of symptoms are interpreted as representative of particular conditions. This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  74
    Prospects for Naturalizing Color.Alistair Isaac - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):902-914.
    Paul Churchland has recently offered a novel argument for the “objective reality” of color. The strategy he employs to make this argument is an instance of a more general research program for interpreting perceptual content, “domain‐portrayal semantics.” In the first half of the article, I point out some features of color vision that complicate Churchland's conclusion, in particular, the context‐sensitive and inferential nature of color perception. In the second half, I examine and defend the general research program, concluding it is (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Deleuze and Deep Ecology.Alistair Welchman - 2008 - In Bernd Herzogenrath (ed.), An (Un)easy Alliance: Thinking the Environment with Deleuze/Guattari. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: pp. 116-138.
    I argue that 'deep' ecology (as exemplified by the work of Arnie Naess) involves three inter-related commitments: (1) to an ethics of nature or axiological anti-humanism in which natural entities, processes or systems can possess intrinsic value independently of human beings; (2) a metaphysical naturalism or anti-humanism in which human beings are themselves conceptualized as natural products; (3) a transformative aspect. Although (3) is sometimes cast in personal or psychological terms, I think the idea can be given a properly philosophical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  33
    Epistemic Loops and Measurement Realism.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (5):930-941.
    Recent philosophy of measurement has emphasized the existence of both diachronic and synchronic “loops,” or feedback processes, in the epistemic achievements of measurement. A widespread response has been to conclude that measurement outcomes do not convey interest-independent facts about the world, and that only a coherentist epistemology of measurement is viable. In contrast, I argue that a form of measurement realism is consistent with these results. The insight is that antecedent structure in measuring spaces constrains our empirical procedures such that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  43
    Do Sensorimotor Processes Have Reflexes in Sentence Syntax as Well as Sentence Semantics?Alistair Knott - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):294-295.
    Predicate logic has proved a very useful tool for the expression of theories of natural language semantics. Hurford's suggestion that predicate–argument structures mirror certain properties of the human sensorimotor architecture can be seen as an explanation of why this is so. Although I support this view, I think that the correspondences that Hurford draws between linguistic and sensorimotor structures not only involve natural language semantics, but include some elements of natural language syntax as well.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Deleuze and Schopenhauer.Alistair Welchman - 2015 - In Craig Lundy & Daniella Voss (eds.), At the Edges of Thought: Deleuze and Post-Kantian Philosophy. Edinburgh, UK: pp. 213-252.
    Deleuze does not mention Schopenhauer very frequently. Certainly Schopenhauer does not appear to be in the counter-canon of life-affirming philosophers that Deleuze so values – indeed, far from it. Nor does he appear to be even a favoured ‘enemy’ as he describes Kant, or as he sometimes appears to view Hegel. Nevertheless, I think Schopenhauer’s break from Kant is crucial for understanding not only Deleuze’s account of Nietzsche, but also for a proper grasp of the core Deleuzian distinction between the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  20
    Realism Without Tears II: The Structuralist Legacy of Sensory Physiology.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 79:15-29.
    This paper examines the implications of the Doctrine of Specific Nerve Energies for contemporary philosophy and psychology. Part I analyzed Johannes Peter Muller’s canonical formulation of the Doctrine, arguing that it follows from empirical results combined with methodological principles. Here, I argue that these methodological principles remain valid in psychology today, consequently, any naturalistic philosophy of perception must accept the Doctrine’s skeptical conclusion, that the qualities of our perceptual experience are not determined by, and thus do not reveal the nature (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Affinity, Judgement, Things in Themselves.Alistair Welchman - 2000 - In Andrea Rehberg & Rachel Jones (eds.), The Matter of Critique: Readings in Kant's Philosophy. Manchester, UK: pp. 202-221.
    In this paper I offer a reading of the 1790 Introduction to the Critique of Judgement intended to show that the Critique of Judgement itself attempts to make good a serious deficit in the argumentation of the Critique of Pure Reason. In effect, the conditions outlined in the Critique of Pure Reason could be fulfilled without experience being constituted. There must therefore be additional conditions for the possibility of experience. And an account of these is to be found in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Seeing Things: Schopenhauer's Kant Critique and Direct Realism.Alistair Welchman - forthcoming - In Alistair Welchman & Judith Norman (eds.), Schopenhauer's World as Will and Representation: A Critical Guide. Cambridge, UK:
    In this paper I argue, in the first section, that Schopenhauer was a direct perceptual realist. I think Schopenhauer’s critique of Kant in the Appendix to WWR 1 is largely bound together by his view that Kant was still welded to a pre-critical indirect perceptual realism which creates the various points of tension or compromise formations that Schopenhauer enumerates. In the second section I go on to argue that this perceptual direct realism sheds light on his account of compassion, in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  18
    Digital Images: Content and Compositionality.Alistair M. C. Isaac - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (1):106-126.
    Typical accounts of imagistic content have focused on the apparent analog character or continuous variability of images. In contrast, I consider the distinctive features of digital images, those composed of finite sets of discrete pixels. A rich source of evidence on digital imagistic content is found in the content-preserving algorithms that resize and reproduce digital images on computer screens and printers. I argue that these algorithms reveal a distinctive structural feature: digital images are always compositional (their parts contribute systematically to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Schelling's Moral Argument for a Metaphysics of Contingency.Alistair Welchman - 2014 - In Emilio Corriero & Andrea Dezi (eds.), Nature and Realism in Schelling’s Philosophy of Nature. Turin, Metropolitan City of Turin, Italy: pp. 27-54.
    Schelling’s middle period works have always been a source of fascination: they mark a break with the idealism (in both senses of the word) of his early works and the Fichtean and then Hegelian tradition; while they are not weighed down by the reactionary burden of his late lectures on theology and mythology. But they have been equally a source of perplexity. The central work of this period, the Essay on Human Freedom (1809) takes as its topic the moral problem (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000