Results for 'Alternative agrifood institutions'

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  1.  24
    Local or Localized? Exploring the Contributions of Franco-Mediterranean Agrifood Theory to Alternative Food Research.Sarah Bowen & Tad Mutersbaugh - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):201-213.
    Notions such as terroir and “Slow Food,” which originated in Mediterranean Europe, have emerged as buzzwords around the globe, becoming commonplace across Europe and economically important in the United States and Canada, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Given the increased global prominence of terroir and regulatory frameworks like geographical indications, we argue that the associated conceptual tools have become more relevant to scholars working within the “alternative food networks” framework in the United States and United Kingdom. Specifically, the Local (...)
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  2.  78
    From “Old School” to “Farm-to-School”: Neoliberalization From the Ground Up. [REVIEW]Patricia Allen & Julie Guthman - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):401-415.
    Farm-to-school (FTS) programs have garnered the attentions and energies of people in a diverse array of social locations in the food system and are serving as a sort of touchstone for many in the alternative agrifood movement. Yet, unlike other alternative agrifood initiatives, FTS programs intersect directly with the long-established institution of the welfare state, including its vestiges of New Deal farm programs and public entitlement. This paper explores how FTS is navigating the liminal terrain of (...)
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  3. Mining for Justice in the Food System: Perceptions, Practices, and Possibilities. [REVIEW]Patricia Allen - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):157-161.
    Despite much popular interest in food issues, there remains a lack of social justice in the American agrifood system, as evidenced by prevalent hunger and obesity in low-income populations and exploitation of farmworkers. While many consumers and alternative agrifood organizations express interest in and support social justice goals, the incorporation of these goals into on-the-ground alternatives is often tenuous. Academics have an important role in calling out social justice issues and developing the critical thinking skills that can (...)
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  4.  35
    Farm to School Programs: Exploring the Role of Regionally-Based Food Distributors in Alternative Agrifood Networks. [REVIEW]Betty T. Izumi, D. Wynne Wright & Michael W. Hamm - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):335-350.
    Farm to school programs are at the vanguard of efforts to create an alternative agrifood system in the United States. Regionally-based, mid-tier food distributors may play an important role in harnessing the potential of farm to school programs to create viable market opportunities for small- and mid-size family farmers, while bringing more locally grown fresh food to school cafeterias. This paper focuses on the perspectives of food distributors. Our findings suggest that the food distributors profiled have the potential (...)
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  5.  15
    Alternative Consent Models for Comparative Effectiveness Studies: Views of Patients From Two Institutions.Nancy Kass, Ruth Faden, Rachel E. Fabi, Stephanie Morain, Kristina Hallez, Danielle Whicher, Sean Tunis, Rachael Moloney, Donna Messner & James Pitcavage - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (2):92-105.
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  6.  22
    Critical Institutions: Alternative Modes of Institutionalisation in Derrida's Engagements.Cillian Ó Fathaigh - 2021 - Derrida Today 14 (2):169-185.
    In this article, I consider the role of institutions in Jacques Derrida’s political engagement. In spite of Derrida’s significant involvement with political causes throughout his life, his engagements have received little sustained attention, and this is particularly true of his work with institutions. I turn to two such cases, the Collège international de philosophie and the Parlement international des écrivains and argue that these represent an alternative mode of institutionalisation. These institutions seek to destabilise other (...) as well as themselves.Looking closely at the institutions that Derrida founded, we see three common characteristics emerge. These institutions are anti-hegemonic,self-reflexive and international. I then connect these to Derrida’s thought, offering a reading of the undecidable, which brings forth the importance of conventions in the decision. Finally, I demonstrate that the three shared characteristics of Derrida’s institutions form part of an effort to open up space for the possibility of alterity. Through this, and beyond a distinction between theory/practice, we come to see Derrida’s institutional engagements as an active form of critique, both of other institutions and themselves. (shrink)
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  7. What Is Money? An Alternative To Searle's Institutional Facts.J. P. Smit, Filip Buekens & Stan du Plessis - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):1-22.
    In The Construction of Social Reality, John Searle develops a theory of institutional facts and objects, of which money, borders and property are presented as prime examples. These objects are the result of us collectively intending certain natural objects to have a certain status, i.e. to ‘count as’ being certain social objects. This view renders such objects irreducible to natural objects. In this paper we propose a radically different approach that is more compatible with standard economic theory. We claim that (...)
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  8.  34
    Agrifood Systems for Competent, Ordinary People. Presidential Address: Joint Meetings of the Agricultural, Food and Human Values Society and the Association for the Study of Food and Society, Madison, Wisconsin, June 5–8, 1997. [REVIEW]G. W. Stevenson - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (3):199-207.
    Focusing on the notion of competencies, the address explores important dimensions of human infrastructure for negotiating alternative agrifood systems. The analytical competencies emphasized are those of making connections and evaluating contradictions. Farm structure and food system connections with human health and consumer culture are chosen as examples. Examined in the context of social change strategies, relational competencies focus on new forms of food citizenship involving alternative organizational relationships between farmers, retailers, and customers. Ethical competencies are framed in (...)
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  9.  17
    Farm to Institution Programs: Organizing Practices That Enable and Constrain Vermont’s Alternative Food Supply Chains.Sarah N. Heiss, Noelle K. Sevoian, David S. Conner & Linda Berlin - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (1):87-97.
    Farm to institution programs represent alternative supply chains that aim to organize the activities of local producers with institutions that feed the local community. The current study demonstrates the value of structuration theory :75–80, 1983; The constitution of society: outline of the theory of structuration. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1984) for conceptualizing how FTI agents create, maintain, and change organizational structures associated with FTI and traditional supply chains. Based on interviews with supply chain agents participating in FTI (...)
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  10.  22
    Civil Economy: An Alternative to the Social Market Economy? Analysis in the Framework of Individual Versus Institutional Ethics.María Guadalupe Martino - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (1):15-28.
    The Civil Economy approach, as developed by Italian economists Luigino Bruni and Stefano Zamagni, aims at introducing reciprocity into the economy as a humanizing factor. Despite being presented as an innovative perspective, the CE approach shares many characteristics with the German model of Social Market Economy. The present paper compares both approaches, showing that they in fact share a normative basis and similar aims but address them from diverse points of view; namely, CE addresses them from a virtue ethics perspective (...)
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  11. Alternative Activities During a Pandemic Period in the Sphere of Cultural Institutions.Michaela Škorupová - 2020 - EUREKA: Social and Humanities 3:20-26.
    Taking a broad-based view on the global health crisis, this paper examines the feasibility of cultural sector reaction on radical changes on an unexpected situation with an unknown deadline. The paper summarized the theoretical basis in public relations, presented by Slovak, Czech and foreign authors that explain the meaning, aims and value of PR in the cultural sector. It refers to three basic goals of PR – building an image, routine publicity and crisis PR. The author emphasizes on signification settings (...)
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  12.  1
    Institutional Violations, Costs and Attitudes.Vojtěch Zachník - forthcoming - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour.
    The paper proposes an alternative approach to the ontology of social institutions by systematizing various normative institutional influences and identifying processes that distinguish between conforming and violating behaviour. The prevailing – cost-based model – suggests that an agent's conformity to a specific institutional rule can be represented by a single measure – cost. The model is limited in its explanatory potential since it accounts for varieties of institutional behaviour in terms of single parametrical changes in the agents' utilities. (...)
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  13.  32
    The Emancipatory Question: The Next Step in the Sociology of Agrifood Systems? [REVIEW]Douglas H. Constance - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):151-155.
    I provide an historical overview of the development of the Sociology of Agriculture as a critical response to perceived inadequacies of conservative theories of social change regarding rural society in general, and agriculture in particular. I do this by focusing on the three questions that have dominated the discourse on agrifood studies: “The Agrarian Question,” “The Environment Question,” and “The Food Question.” I analyze the success and constraints of selected alternative agrifood initiatives in relation to the three (...)
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  14.  25
    “Chasms” in Agrifood Systems: Rethinking How We Can Contribute. [REVIEW]William H. Friedland - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):197-201.
    The reaction to conventional agriculture and food systems has generated a host of alternative social movements in the past several decades. Many progressive agrifood researchers have researched these movements, exploring their strengths, weaknesses, and failures. Most such research is abstracted from the movements themselves. This paper proposes a new way of self-organization that, while fulfilling traditional university demands on researchers, will provide research support for progressive agrifood movements by transcending the boundaries of disciplines and individual universities.
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  15.  42
    Action Research on Alternative Land Tenure Arrangements in Wenchi, Ghana: Learning From Ambiguous Social Dynamics and Self-Organized Institutional Innovation. [REVIEW]Samuel Adjei-Nsiah, Cees Leeuwis, Ken E. Giller & Thom W. Kuyper - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):389-403.
    This study reports on action research efforts that were aimed at developing institutional arrangements beneficial for soil fertility improvement. Three stages of action research are described and analyzed. We initially began by bringing stakeholders together in a platform to engage in a collaborative design of new arrangements. However, this effort was stymied mainly because conditions conducive for learning and negotiation were lacking. We then proceeded to support experimentation with alternative arrangements initiated by individual landowners and migrant farmers. The implementation (...)
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  16.  21
    Virgil, Vigilance, and Voice: Agrifood Ethics in an Age of Globalization. [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (5):459-477.
    Some 2000 years ago, Virgil wroteThe Georgics, a political tract on Romanagriculture in the form of a poem. Today, as aresult of rising global trade in food andagricultural products, growing economicconcentration, the merging of food andpharmacy, chronic obesity in the midst ofhunger, and new disease and pest vectors, weare in need of a new Georgics that addressesthe two key issues of our time: vigilance andvoice. On the one hand, vigilance must becentral to a new Georgics. Enforceablestandards for food safety, food (...)
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  17. The Incentivized Action View of Institutional Facts as an Alternative to the Searlean View: A Response to Butchard and D’Amico.J. P. Smit, Filip Buekens & Stan du Plessis - 2016 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 46 (1):44-55.
    In our earlier work, we argued, contra Searle, that institutional facts can be understood in terms of non-institutional facts about actions and incentives. Butchard and D’Amico claim that we have misinterpreted Searle, that our main argument against him has no merit and that our positive view cannot account for institutional facts created via joint action. We deny all three charges.
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  18.  47
    Joseph J. Jacobs on Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health.Thomasine Kushner & Charles MacKay - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (3):442.
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  19. Prescribing Institutions Without Ideal Theory.David Wiens - 2012 - Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (1):45-70.
    It is conventional wisdom among political philosophers that ideal principles of justice must guide our attempts to design institutions to avert actual injustice. Call this the ideal guidance approach. I argue that this view is misguided— ideal principles of justice are not appropriate "guiding principles" that actual institutions must aim to realize, even if only approximately. Fortunately, the conventional wisdom is also avoidable. In this paper, I develop an alternative approach to institutional design, which I call institutional (...)
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  20.  21
    Joseph J. Jacobs on Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. Interview by Thomasine Kushner and Charles MacKay. [REVIEW]J. J. Jacobs - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (3):442.
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  21.  34
    No Alternative? The Politics and History of Non-GMO Certification.Robin Jane Roff - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (4):351-363.
    Third-party certification is an increasingly prevalent tactic which agrifood activists use to “help” consumers shop ethically, and also to reorganize commodity markets. While consumers embrace the chance to “vote with their dollar,” academics question the potential for labels to foster widespread political, economic, and agroecological change. Yet, despite widespread critique, a mounting body of work appears resigned to accept that certification may be the only option available to activist groups in the context of neoliberal socio-economic orders. At the extreme, (...)
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  22.  7
    Gilmore P. C.. An Alternative to Set Theory. The American Mathematical Monthly, Vol. 67 , Pp. 621–632.Gilmore P. C.. The Monadic Theory of Types in the Lower Predicate Calculus. Summaries of Talks Presented at the Summer Institute for Symbolic Logic, Cornell University, 1957, 2nd Edn., Communications Research Division, Institute for Defense Analyses, Princeton, N.J., 1960, Pp. 309–312. [REVIEW]Bede Rundle - 1972 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (4):766-767.
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  23.  87
    Actors in Private Food Governance: The Legitimacy of Retail Standards and Multistakeholder Initiatives with Civil Society Participation. [REVIEW]Doris Fuchs, Agni Kalfagianni & Tetty Havinga - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):353-367.
    Democratic legitimacy is rarely associated with private governance. After all, private actors are not legitimized through elections by a demos. Instead of abandoning democratic principles when entering the private sphere of governance, however, this article argues in favour of employing alternative criteria of democracy in assessments. Specifically, this article uses the criteria of participation, transparency and accountability to evaluate the democratic legitimacy of private food retail governance institutions. It pursues this evaluation of the democratic legitimacy of these (...) against the background of their ambivalent impact on the sustainability of the global agrifood system. The paper refers to a range of cases of private retail standards with different governance structures and substantial foci to illustrate its argument. (shrink)
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  24.  47
    Alternative Modes of Governance: Organic as Civic Engagement. [REVIEW]E. Melanie DuPuis & Sean Gillon - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):43-56.
    A major strategy in the creation of sustainable economies is the establishment of alternative market institutions, such as fair trade and local market systems. However, the dynamics of these alternative markets are poorly understood. What are the rules of behavior by which these markets function? How do these markets maintain their separate identity as “alternative”: apart from the conventional (“free”) market system? Building on Lyson’s notion of civic agriculture, we argue that alternative markets maintain themselves (...)
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  25.  10
    Unconceived Alternatives and Conservatism in Science: The Impact of Professionalization, Peer-Review, and Big Science.P. Stanford - 2019 - Synthese 196 (10):3915-3932.
    Scientific realists have suggested that changes in our scientific communities over the course of their history have rendered those communities progressively less vulnerable to the problem of unconcieved alternatives over time. I argue in response not only that the most fundamental historical transformations of the scientific enterprise have generated steadily mounting obstacles to revolutionary, transformative, or unorthodox scientific theorizing, but also that we have substantial independent evidence that the institutional apparatus of contemporary scientific inquiry fosters an exceedingly and increasingly theoretically (...)
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  26. Alternative Action Theory: Simultaneously a Critique of Georg Henrik von Wright’s Practical Philosophy.Ota Weinberger - 1997 - Dordrecht, Netherland: Springer.
    Action is conceived of as an intentional behavior of an individual or of an institutional subject; it is determined by information processing, namely by a process in which pieces of descriptive and practical information are involved. Action is explained by a formal and finalistic theory which is connected with a specific theory of institutions. The philosophical basis of the logic of norm sentences and of other systems of practical thinking is discussed. The author criticizes traditional deontic logic and argues (...)
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  27. Unconceived Alternatives and Conservatism in Science: The Impact of Professionalization, Peer-Review, and Big Science.P. Kyle Stanford - 2015 - Synthese:1-18.
    Scientific realists have suggested that changes in our scientific communities over the course of their history have rendered those communities progressively less vulnerable to the problem of unconcieved alternatives over time. I argue in response not only that the most fundamental historical transformations of the scientific enterprise have generated steadily mounting obstacles to revolutionary, transformative, or unorthodox scientific theorizing, but also that we have substantial independent evidence that the institutional apparatus of contemporary scientific inquiry fosters an exceedingly and increasingly theoretically (...)
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  28.  83
    Institutional Pluralism and the Limits of the Market.Rutger J. G. Claassen - 2009 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (4):420-447.
    This paper proposes a theory of institutional pluralism to deal with the question whether and to what extent limits should be placed on the market. It reconceives the pluralist position as it was presented by Michael Walzer and others in several respects. First, it argues that the options on the institutional menu should not be principles of distribution but rather economic mechanisms or ‘modes of provision’. This marks a shift from a distributive to a provisional logic. Second, it argues that (...)
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  29.  2
    The Pros and Cons of Commercial Institutions as an Alternative Venue for Training Translators and Publishing Translations in Japan.Judy Wakabayashi - 2014 - Perspectives 22 (4):534-546.
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  30.  31
    Contested Institutional Facts.Johan Brännmark - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (5):1047-1064.
    A significant part of contemporary social ontology has been focused on understanding forms of collective intentionality. It is suggested in this paper that the contested nature of some institutional matters makes this kind of approach problematic, and instead an alternative approach is developed, one that is oriented towards a micro-level analysis of the institutional constraints that we face in everyday life and which can make sense of how there can be institutional facts that are deeply contested and yet still (...)
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  31.  3
    Alternatives to Capitalism.Jon Elster & Karl O. Moene (eds.) - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this provocative collection survey and assess institutional arrangements that offer possible alternatives to capitalism as it exists today. The point of departure agreed upon by the contributors is that on the one hand, capitalism produces unemployment, a lack of autonomy in the workplace, and massive income inequalities; while on the other, central socialist planning is characterized by underemployment, inefficiency, and bureaucracy. In Part I of the volume, various alternatives are proposed: profit-sharing systems, capitalism combined with some central (...)
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  32.  8
    Fake News, Relevant Alternatives, and the Degradation of Our Epistemic Environment.Christopher Blake-Turner - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 1.
    This paper contributes to the growing literature in social epistemology of diagnosing the epistemically problematic features of fake news. I identify two novel problems: the problem of relevant alternatives; and the problem of the degradation of the epistemic environment. The former arises among individual epistemic transactions. By making salient, and thereby relevant, alternatives to knowledge claims, fake news stories threaten knowledge. The problem of the degradation of the epistemic environment arises at the level of entire epistemic communities. I introduce the (...)
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  33. Institutional Consequentialism and Global Governance.Attila Tanyi & András Miklós - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (3):279-297.
    Elsewhere we have responded to the so-called demandingness objection to consequentialism – that consequentialism is excessively demanding and is therefore unacceptable as a moral theory – by introducing the theoretical position we call institutional consequentialism. This is a consequentialist view that, however, requires institutional systems, and not individuals, to follow the consequentialist principle. In this paper, we first introduce and explain the theory of institutional consequentialism and the main reasons that support it. In the remainder of the paper, we turn (...)
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  34. Institution Animal Care and Use Committees Need Greater Ethical Diversity.Lawrence Arthur Hansen - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):188-190.
    Next SectionIn response to public outrage stemming from exposés of animal abuse in research laboratories, the US Congress in 1985 mandated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) to oversee animal use at institutions receiving federal grants. IACUCs were enjoined to respect public concern about the treatment of animals in research, but they were not specifically instructed whether or not to perform ethical cost-benefit analyses of animal research protocols that IACUCs have chosen, with approval contingent upon a balancing of (...)
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  35.  24
    The Institution of Philosophy: Escaping Disciplinary Capture.Adam Briggle & Robert Frodeman - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):26-38.
    Philosophers view themselves as critical thinkers par excellence. But they have overlooked the institutional arrangements that govern their lives. The early twentieth-century research university disciplined philosophers, placing them in departments, where they wrote for and were judged by their disciplinary peers. Oddly, this change has been unremarked upon, or has been treated as simply part of the necessary professionalization of an academic field of research. The department has been tacitly assumed to be a neutral space from which thought germinates; it (...)
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  36.  31
    Reconstructivism Versus Critical Theory of Technology: Alternative Perspectives on Activism and Institutional Entrepreneurship in the Czech Wireless Community.Johan Söderberg - 2010 - Social Epistemology 24 (4):239-262.
    This article sets out to compare reconstructivism and critical theory as two possible avenues for a normative science and technology studies discipline “after constructivism”. This investigation is pursued through a case study of a wireless network community in the Czech Republic. The case study focuses on a schism that erupted after some users attempted to commercialise an invention for sending data with visible light. Their enterprise was partly motivated by a larger, political aspiration of creating a decentralised communication infrastructure. Other (...)
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  37.  38
    Richard Laver. The Left Distributive Law and the Freeness of an Algebra of Elementary Embeddings. Advances in Mathematics, Vol. 91 , Pp. 209–231. - Richard Laver. A Division Algorithm for the Free Left Distributive Algebra. Logic Colloquium '90, ASL Summer Meeting in Helsinki, Edited by J. Oikkonen and J. Väänänen, Lecture Notes in Logic, No. 2, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, Etc., 1993, Pp. 155–162. - Richard Laver. On the Algebra of Elementary Embeddings of a Rank Into Itself. Advances in Mathematics, Vol. 110 , Pp. 334–346. - Richard Laver. Braid Group Actions on Left Distributive Structures, and Well Orderings in the Braid Groups. Journal of Pure and Applied Algebra, Vol. 108 , Pp. 81–98. - Patrick Dehornoy. An Alternative Proof of Laver's Results on the Algebra Generated by an Elementary Embedding. Set Theory of the Continuum, Edited by H. Judah, W. Just, and H. Woodin, Mathematics Sciences Research Institute Publications, Vol. 26, Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin. [REVIEW]Aleš Drápal - 2002 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 8 (4):555-560.
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  38.  86
    Bioethics is Love of Life: An Alternative Textbook: Darryl R J Macer, Christchurch, New Zealand, Eubios Ethics Institute, 1998, 158 Pages, Pound12 (Pb). [REVIEW]David Lamb - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (3):212-213.
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  39.  28
    Institutional Externalism.Giuliano Torrengo - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (1):67-85.
    Many philosophers regard collective behavior and attitudes as the ground of the whole of social reality. According to this popular view, society is composed basically of collective intentions and cooperative behaviors; this is so both for informal contexts involving small groups and for complex institutional structures. In this article, I challenge this view, and propose an alternative approach, which I term institutional externalism. I argue that institutions are characterized by the tendency to defer to elements that are external (...)
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  40. Demands of Justice, Feasible Alternatives, and the Need for Causal Analysis.David Wiens - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):325-338.
    Many political philosophers hold the Feasible Alternatives Principle (FAP): justice demands that we implement some reform of international institutions P only if P is feasible and P improves upon the status quo from the standpoint of justice. The FAP implies that any argument for a moral requirement to implement P must incorporate claims whose content pertains to the causal processes that explain the current state of affairs. Yet, philosophers routinely neglect the need to attend to actual causal processes. This (...)
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  41.  14
    Institution Types and Institution Tokens: An Unproblematic Distinction?Rico Hauswald - 2018 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 48 (6):594-607.
    The distinction between institution types and institution tokens plays an important role in Francesco Guala’s philosophy of institutions. In this commentary, I argue that this distinction faces a number of difficulties that are not sufficiently addressed in Understanding Institutions. In particular, I critically discuss Guala’s comparison between the taxonomy of organisms and the taxonomy of institutions, consider the semantics of institution terms on different levels in this taxonomy, and argue for an alternative solution to the problem (...)
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  42. The Occupation of Institutionality and Institutional Liberation – Interview with Not An Alternative.Steve Lyons & Jason Jones - 2018 - Continent 7 (1).
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  43.  28
    Institutional Determinants of Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility: Are Multinational Entities Taking Advantage of Weak Environmental Enforcement in Lower‐Income Nations?Stephen R. Luxmore, Clyde Eirikur Hull & Zhi Tang - 2018 - Business and Society Review 123 (1):151-179.
    Multinational enterprises are often accused of taking advantage of lax environmental regulations in developing countries. However, no quantitative analysis of the impact of doing business in nations of different income levels on environmental corporate social responsibility has been done prior to this study. Incorporating institutional factors in our approach, we argue that endoisomorphic and exoisomorphic pressures relating to ECSR impact MNEs differently according to the MNEs' level of activity in low-, lower-middle-, upper-middle-, and high-income nations. We predict and, using data (...)
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  44.  20
    The Moral Responsibility of Educational Institutions: Critique and Alternative.Robert D. Heslep - 1983 - Educational Theory 33 (1):11-19.
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  45.  79
    Dewey’s Social Ontology: A Pragmatist Alternative to Searle’s Approach to Social Reality.Italo Testa - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 25 (1):40-62.
    Dewey’s social ontology could be characterized as a habit ontology, an ontology of habit qua second nature that offers us an account of intentionality, social statuses, institutions, and norms in terms of habituations. Such an account offers us a promising alternative to contemporary intentionalist and deontic approaches to social ontology such as Searle’s. Furthermore, it could be the basis of a social ontology better suited to explain both the maintenance and the transformation of social reality. In the first (...)
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  46.  3
    Centre de Recherches Sociologiques sur le Droit et les Institutions Pénales conditional fee agreement confidence interval.Clean Air Act & Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy - 2010 - In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.
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  47.  4
    Institutional Entrepreneurship in a Contested Commons: Insights From Struggles Over the Oasis of Jemna in Tunisia.Karim Ben-Slimane, Rachida Justo & Nabil Khelil - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (4):673-690.
    Recently, management literature has sought to examine the role of institutional entrepreneurs in the emergence of commons logic and in building consensus around its meaning. While the focus has been on new commons, not all are created ex nihilo. Some types of preexisting commons, known as contested commons, often pose challenges that result in disagreements and conflicts with respect to their ownership, use, and management. These commons are a ubiquitous yet understudied phenomenon. In this paper, we use the case of (...)
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  48.  51
    Alternatives to the Prison.Michel Foucault - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (6):12-24.
    This paper examines the problem of alternatives to the prison in order to problematize the prison as an institution, as a form of punishment and as a system for promoting respect for the law. It argues that the mechanisms that were central to the prison during the 19th century, such as the practice of penitence as a principle of rehabilitation, the family as agent of correction, or as agent of legality, and labour as a fundamental instrument for punishment, still operate (...)
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  49.  35
    Complementary Alternative Benefits to Promote Peace.Norman D. Bishara & Cindy A. Schipani - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S4):539 - 557.
    Recent research has focused on business as a mediating institution that can influence society while engaging in the traditional profit-making and value generation functions. This work includes Professors Fort's and Schipani's arguments about how business may be able to play a role in promoting more peaceful societies, and other research addressing how businesses might serve a role in reducing violence in society and the workplace. Although there is a significant body of scholarship on the role of business in reducing violence (...)
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  50. The Feasible Alternatives Thesis: Kicking Away the Livelihoods of the Global Poor.Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):97-119.
    Many assert that affluent countries have contributed in the past to poverty in developing countries through wars of aggression and conquest, colonialism and its legacies, the imposition of puppet leaders, and support for brutal dictators and venal elites. Thomas Pogge has recently argued that there is an additional and, arguably, even more consequential way in which the affluent continue to contribute to poverty in the developing world. He argues that when people cooperate in instituting and upholding institutional arrangements that foreseeably (...)
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