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  1.  16
    Do solidarity and reciprocity obligations compel African researchers to feedback individual genetic results in genomics research?Dimpho Ralefala, Mary Kasule, Ambroise Wonkam, Mogomotsi Matshaba & Jantina de Vries - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundA key ethical question in genomics research relates to whether individual genetic research results should be disclosed to research participants and if so, which results are to be disclosed, by whom and when. Whilst this issue has received only scarce attention in African bioethics discourse, the extension of genomics research to the African continent has brought it into sharp focus.MethodsIn this qualitative study, we examined the views of adolescents, parents and caregivers participating in a paediatric and adolescent HIV-TB genomic study (...)
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  2.  15
    Exploring the Role of Shared Decision Making in the Consent Process for Pediatric Genomics Research in Cameroon, Tanzania, and Ghana.Daima Bukini, Jantina deVries, Marsha Treadwell, Kofi Anie, Jemima Dennis-Antwi, Karene Kengne Kamga, Sheryl McCurdy, Kwaku Ohene-Frempong, Julie Makani & Ambroise Wonkam - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (3):182-189.
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  3.  11
    Ethics of Human Genetic Studies in Sub‐Saharan Africa: The Case of Cameroon Through a Bibliometric Analysis.Ambroise Wonkam, Marcel Azabji Kenfack, Walinjom F. T. Muna & Odile Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):120-127.
    Many ethical concerns surrounding human genetics studies remain unresolved. We report here the situation in Cameroon.Objectives: To describe the profile of human genetic studies that used Cameroonian DNA samples, with specific focus on i) the research centres that were involved, ii) authorship, iii) population studied, iv) research topics and v) ethics disclosure, with the aim of raising ethical issues that emerged from these studies.Method: Bibliometric Studies; we conducted a PubMed-based systematic review of all the studies on human genetics that used (...)
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  4.  21
    Addressing exploitation and inequities in open science: A relational perspective.Cornelius Ewuoso, Luís Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina Vries - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):331-343.
    There are concerns that participation in open science will lead to various forms of exploitation – of researchers and scholars in low-income countries and under-resourced institutions. This article defends a contrary thesis and demonstrates the exact ways the underexplored notions of communal relationships, human dignity and social justice – and the normative principles to which they give rise – grounded in African philosophy can usefully address critical concerns regarding exploitation in the sharing of research resources to facilitate open partnership/collaboration and (...)
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  5.  21
    Addressing exploitation and inequities in open science: A relational perspective.Cornelius Ewuoso, Luís Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina Vries - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):331-343.
    There are concerns that participation in open science will lead to various forms of exploitation – of researchers and scholars in low-income countries and under-resourced institutions. This article defends a contrary thesis and demonstrates the exact ways the underexplored notions of communal relationships, human dignity and social justice – and the normative principles to which they give rise – grounded in African philosophy can usefully address critical concerns regarding exploitation in the sharing of research resources to facilitate open partnership/collaboration and (...)
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  6.  23
    Epistemic justice, African values and feedback of findings in African genomics research.Cornelius Ewuoso, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina de Vries - 2022 - Global Bioethics 33 (1):122-132.
    This article draws on key normative principles grounded in important values – solidarity, partiality and friendliness – in African philosophy to think critically and deeply about the ethical challenges around returning individual genetic research findings in African genomics research. Precisely, we propose that the normative implication of solidarity, partiality and friendliness is that returning findings should be considered as a gesture of goodwill to participants to the extent that it constitutes acting for their well-being. Concretely, the value of friendliness may (...)
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  7.  14
    Addressing exploitation and inequities in open science: A relational perspective.Cornelius Ewuoso, Luís Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina de Vries - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):331-343.
    There are concerns that participation in open science will lead to various forms of exploitation – of researchers and scholars in low‐income countries and under‐resourced institutions. This article defends a contrary thesis and demonstrates the exact ways the underexplored notions of communal relationships, human dignity and social justice – and the normative principles to which they give rise – grounded in African philosophy can usefully address critical concerns regarding exploitation in the sharing of research resources to facilitate open partnership/collaboration and (...)
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  8.  11
    Should institutions fund the feedback of individual findings in genomic research?Cornelius Ewuoso, Benjamin Berkman, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina de Vries - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The article argues the thesis that institutions have a prima facie obligation to fund the feedback of individual findings in genomic research conducted on the African continent by drawing arguments from an underexplored Afro-communitarian view of distributive justice and rights of researchers to be aided. Whilst some studies have explored how institutions have a duty to support return as a form of ancillary care or additional foreseeable service in research by mostly appealing to dominant principles and theories in the Global (...)
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  9.  9
    Feeding back of individual genetic results in Botswana: mapping opportunities and challenges.Mary Kasule, Mogomotsi Matshaba, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina de Vries - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-10.
    Purpose We explored the views of Botswana stakeholders involved in developing, implementing and applying ethical standards for return of individual study results from genomic research. This allowed for mapping opportunities and challenges regarding actionability requirements that determine whether individual genomic research results should be fed back. Methods Using in-depth interviews, this study explored the views of sixteen (16) stakeholders about the extent, nature and timing of feedback of individual genomic research findings, including incidental findings that arise in the context of (...)
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  10.  10
    Participant views on practical considerations for feedback of individual genetic research results: a case study from Botswana.Dimpho Ralefala, Mary Kasule, Olivia P. Matshabane, Ambroise Wonkam, Mogomotsi Matshaba & Jantina de Vries - 2023 - Global Bioethics 34 (1):1-14.
    Key to discussions around feedback of individual results from genomics research are practical questions on how such results should be fed back, by who and when. However, there has been virtually no work investigating these practical considerations for feedback of individual genetic results in the context of low-and middle-income countries (LMICs), especially in Africa. Consequently, we conducted deliberative focus group discussions with 6 groups of adolescents (n = 44) who previously participated in a genomics study in Botswana as well as (...)
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  11.  16
    Should Feedback of Individual Results be Integrated into the Consent Process in African Genomics? Participants’ Views from an HIV-TB Genomics Research Project in Botswana.Dimpho Ralefala, Mary Kasule, Ambroise Wonkam, Mogomotsi Matshaba & Jantina de Vries - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (1):48-56.
  12.  10
    Assent, parental consent and reconsent for health research in Africa: thematic analysis of national guidelines and lessons from the SickleInAfrica registry.Ambroise Wonkam, Charmaine Royale, Kofi Anie, Malula Nkanyemka, Hilda Tutuba, Daima Bukini, Okocha Emmanuel Chide, Marsha Treadwell, Lawrence Osei-Tutu, Victoria Nembaware & Nchangwi Syntia Munung - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-10.
    The enrolment of children and adolescents in health research requires that attention to be paid to specific assent and consent requirements such as the age range for seeking assent; conditions for parental consent (and waivers); the age group required to provide written assent; content of assent forms; if separate assent and parental consent forms should be used, consent from emancipated young adults; reconsent at the age of adulthood when a waiver of assent requirements may be appropriate and the conditions for (...)
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  13.  26
    Would you terminate a pregnancy affected by sickle cell disease?: Analysis of views of patients in Cameroon.Ambroise Wonkam, Jantina de Vries, Charmaine Royal, Raj Ramesar & I. I. I. Fru Angwafo - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):615-620.
    Sickle cell disease is a debilitating illness that affects quality of life and life expectancy for patients. In Cameroon, it is now possible to opt for termination of an affected pregnancy where the fetus is found to be affected by SCD. Our earlier studies found that, contrary to the views of Cameroonian physicians, a majority of parents with their children suffering from SCD would choose to abort if the fetuses were found to be affected. What have not yet been investigated (...)
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  14.  9
    Would you terminate a pregnancy affected by sickle cell disease? Analysis of views of patients in Cameroon.Ambroise Wonkam, Jantina de Vries, Charmaine D. Royal, Raj Ramesar & Fru F. Angwafo - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):615-620.
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