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Amelie Rorty
Harvard University
  1.  60
    Perspectives on Self-Deception.Brian P. McLaughlin & Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (eds.) - 1988 - University of California Press.
    00 Students of philosophy, psychology, sociology, and literature will welcome this collection of original essays on self-deception and related phenomena such as ...
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  2.  14
    Moral Prejudices: Essays on Ethics.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty & Annette C. Baier - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (4):608.
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  3.  15
    The Lures of Akrasia.Amelie Rorty - 2017 - Philosophy 92 (2):167-181.
    There is more akrasia than meets the eye: it can occur in speech and perception, cognitively and emotionally as well as between decision and action. The lures of akrasia are the same as those that are exercised in ordinary psychological and cognitive inferential contexts. But because it is over-determined and because it occurs in opaque intentional contexts, its attribution remains highly fallible.
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  4.  95
    Explaining Emotions.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) - 1980 - University of California Press.
    The philosopher must inform himself of the relevant empirical investigation to arrive at a definition, and the scientist cannot afford to be naive about the..
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  5.  92
    Essays on Aristotle's De Anima.Martha Craven Nussbaum & Amélie Rorty (eds.) - 1992/1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together a group of outstanding new essays on Aristotle's De Anima, this book covers topics such as the relation between soul and body, sense-perception, imagination, memory, desire, and thought, which present the philosophical substance of Aristotle's views to the modern reader. The contributors write with philosophical subtlety and wide-ranging scholarship, locating their interpretations firmly within the context of Aristotle's thought as a whole.u.
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  6. Descartes on Thinking with the Body.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1992 - In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  7. The Historicity of Psychological Attitudes: Love Is Not Love Which Alters Not When It Alteration Finds.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1987 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):399-412.
  8. Explaining Emotions.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (March):139-161.
    The challenge of explaining the emotions has engaged the attention of the best minds in philosophy and science throughout history. Part of the fascination has been that the emotions resist classification. As adequate account therefore requires receptivity to knowledge from a variety of sources. The philosopher must inform himself of the relevant empirical investigation to arrive at a definition, and the scientist cannot afford to be naive about the assumptions built into his conceptual apparatus. The contributors to this volume have (...)
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  9. Agent Regret.Amélie O. Rorty - 1980 - In A. O. Rorty (ed.), Explaining Emotions. Univ of California Pr. pp. 489--506.
     
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  10. The Identities of Persons.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) - 1976 - University of California Press.
    In this volume, thirteen philosophers contribute new essays analyzing the criteria for personal identity and their import on ethics and the theory of action: it ...
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  11. Essays on Descartes' Meditations.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) - 1986 - University of California Press.
    The essays in this volume form a commentary on Descartes' _Meditations_. Following the sequence of the meditational stages, the authors analyze the function of each stage in transforming the reader, to realize his essential nature as a rational inquirer, capable of scientific, demonstrable knowledge of the world. There are essays on the genre of meditational writing, on the implications of the opening cathartic section of the book on Descartes' theory of perception and his use of skeptical arguments; essays on the (...)
     
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  12. Mind in Action.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1992 - Ethics 102 (4):844-846.
     
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  13. Essays on Aristotle's Ethics.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) - 1980 - University of California Press.
    This compilation will mark a high point of excellence in its genre."--Gregory Vlastos, University of California, Berkeley.
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  14. Akratic Believers.Amelie Rorty - 1983 - American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (2):175-183.
    A person has performed an action akratically when he intentionally, voluntarily acts contrary to what he thinks, all things considered, is best to do. This is very misleadingly called weakness of the will; less misleadingly, akrasia of action. I should like to show that there is intellectual as well as practical akrasia. This might, equally misleadingly, be called weakness of belief; less misleadingly, akrasia of belief.
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  15. Where Does the Akratic Break Take Place?Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1980 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (4):333 – 346.
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  16.  31
    User-Friendly Self-Deception.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (268):211 - 228.
    Since many varieties of self-deception are ineradicable and useful, it would be wise to be ambivalent about at least some of its forms.1 It is open-eyed ambivalence that acknowledges its own dualities rather than ordinary shifty vacillation that we need. To be sure, self-deception remains dangerous: sensible ambivalence should not relax vigilance against pretence and falsity, combating irrationality and obfuscation wherever they occur.
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  17. The Dramatic Sources of Philosophy.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 2008 - Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 11-30.
    This paper traces some of the sources of Socratic dialectic: myth, drama, lyric poetry, law and the courts, pre-Socratic cosmology.
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  18. Sartre's Still-Life Portraits.Ámelie Rorty - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):329-339.
    Near the outset of Faust, Goethe sets his protagonist to translating the beginning of the Book of John. Dissatisfied with translating logos as Word, Faust tries "In the beginning was Mind" (Sinn), but he quickly retreats: "Can it be Mind what makes and shapes all things? Surely it should be 'In the beginning was Power (Kraft).'" Yet reflecting that Power might be merely latent, merely potential, he perseveres until finally Spirit (Geist) prompts Faust to settle on, "In the beginning was (...)
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  19. Philosophers on Education: New Historical Perspectives.Amélie Rorty (ed.) - 1998 - Routledge.
    Philosophers on Education offers us the most comprehensive available history of philosopher's views and impacts on the directions of education. As Amelie Rorty explains, in describing a history of education, we are essentially describing and gaining the clearest understanding of the issues that presently concern and divide us. The essays in this stellar collection are written by some of the finest comtemporary philosophers. Those interested in history of philosophy, epistemology, moral psychology and education, and political theory will find Philosophers on (...)
     
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  20.  37
    The Hidden Politics of Cultural Identification.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1994 - Political Theory 22 (1):152-166.
    While cultural identification --cultural essentialism and reification-- can play an important liberating role. it is also internally oppressive; it denies the dynamics of intra cultural divisions.
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  21.  58
    Essays on Aristotle's Poetics.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) - 1992 - Princeton University Press.
    Aimed at deepening our understanding of the Poetics, this collection places Aristotle's analysis of tragedy in its larger philosophical context.
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  22.  82
    "Appendix: Review of" The Many Faces of Evil: Historical Perspectives". [REVIEW]Amélie Oksenberg Rorty & Adam Morton - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):339-340.
    review of Rorty's collection on evil. Generally admring, but complaining about the disparate phenomena included under the heading. And remarking on the peculiarities of the Enlish word 'evil' not found in other European languages.
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  23.  59
    The Two Faces of Courage.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (236):151-171.
    Courage is dangerous. If it is defined in traditional ways, as a set of dispositions to overcome fear, to oppose obstacles, to perform difficult or dangerous actions, its claim to be a virtue is questionable. Unlike the virtue of justice, or a sense of proportion, traditional courage does not itself determine what is to be done, let alone assure that it is worth doing. If we retain the traditional conception of courage and its military connotations–overcoming and combat–we should be suspicious (...)
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  24. From Passions to Emotions and Sentiments.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (220):159 - 172.
    During the period from Descartes to Rousseau, the mind changed. Its domain was redefined; its activities were redescribed; and its various powers were redistributed. Once a part of cosmic Nous, its various functions delimited by its embodied condition, the individual mind now becomes a field of forces with desires impinging on one another, their forces resolved according to their strengths and directions. Of course since there is no such thing as The Mind Itself, it was not the mind that changed. (...)
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  25. A Plea for Ambivalence.Amelie Rorty - 2009 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
     
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  26.  10
    [Book Review] Mind in Action, Essays in the Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW]Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1988 - Ethics 102:844-846.
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  27. Spinoza on the Pathos of Idolatrous Love and the Hilarity of True Love.Amelie Rorty - 2009 - In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  28.  49
    The Use and Abuse of Morality.Amelie Rorty - 2012 - The Journal of Ethics 16 (1):1-13.
    Both morality and theories of morality play many distinctive—and sometimes apparently conflicting—functions: they identify and prohibit wrongful aggression; they chart and analyze basic duties; they present ideals for emulation; they set the terms or justice, rights and entitlements; they characterize the norms of basic decency and neighborliness. Since many of these can, in practice, come into conflict with one another, morality provides guidance for integrating priorities. Claims to morality can, however, be misused as well as used: sanctimonious self-righteousness, self-centered moral (...)
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  29.  51
    Aristotle on the Virtues of Rhetoric.Amélie Rorty - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 64 (4):715-733.
    Aristotle’s phronimos is a model of the virtues: he fuses sound practical reasoning with well formed desires. Among the skills of practical reasoning are those of finding the right words and arguments in the process of deliberation. As Aristotle puts it, virtue involves doing the right thing at the right time and for the right reason. Speaking well, saying the right thing in the right way is not limited to public oratory: it pervades practical life. Aristotle’s phronimos must acquire the (...)
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  30. The Two Faces of Stoicism: Rousseau and Freud.Amélie Rorty - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):335-356.
    The Two Faces of Stoicism: Rousseau and Freud AMI~LIE OKSENBERG RORTY Nor do the Stoics mean that the soul of their wisest man resists the first visions and sudden fantasies that surprise [him]: but [he] rather consents that, as it were to a natural subjection, he yields .... So likewise in other passions, always provided his opinions remain safe and whole, and.., his reason admit no tainting or alteration, and he in no whit consents to his fright and sufferance. Montaigne, (...)
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  31.  35
    The Deceptive Self: Liars, Layers, and Lairs.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1988 - In Brian P. McLaughlin & Amelie O. Rorty (eds.), Perspectives on Self-Deception. University of California Press.
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  32.  58
    Vi. Akrasia and Conflict.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1980 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):193 – 212.
    As Elster suggests in his chapter 'Contradictions of the Mind', in Logic and Society, akrasia and self-deception represent the most common psychological functions for a person in conflict and contradiction. This article develops the theme of akrasia and conflict. Section I says what akrasia is not. Section II describes the character of the akrates, analyzing the sorts of conflicts to which he is subject and describing the sources of his debilities. A brief account is then given of the attractions of (...)
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  33.  59
    Belief and Self-Deception.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1972 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 15 (1-4):387-410.
    In Part I, I consider the normal contexts of assertions of belief and declarations of intentions, arguing that many action-guiding beliefs are accepted uncritically and even pre-consciously. I analyze the function of avowals as expressions of attempts at self-transformation. It is because assertions of beliefs are used to perform a wide range of speech acts besides that of speaking the truth, and because there is a large area of indeterminacy in such assertions, that self-deception is possible. In Part II, I (...)
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  34.  54
    Fearing Death.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (224):175 - 188.
    Many have said, and I think some have shown, that it is irrational to fear death. The extinction of what is essential to the self—whether it be biological death or the permanent cessation of consciousness—cannot by definition be experienced by oneself as a loss or as a harm.
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  35.  68
    The Place of Contemplation in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1978 - Mind 87 (347):343-358.
  36.  40
    Aristotle on the Metaphysical Status of "Pathe".Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1984 - Review of Metaphysics 37 (3):521 - 546.
  37.  19
    Descartes and Spinoza on Epistemological Egalitarianism.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (1):35 - 53.
  38. A Literary Postscript: Characters, Persons, Selves, Individuals.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1976 - In The Identities of Persons. University of California Press. pp. 301--323.
  39.  44
    The Ethics of Reading: A Traveler's Guide.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1997 - Educational Theory 47 (1):85-89.
  40.  2
    Essays on Aristotle's Ethics.Amelie Rorty - 1983 - Noûs 17 (4):701-706.
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  41.  35
    The Two Faces of Spinoza.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):299 - 316.
  42. Essays on Aristotle's Rhetoric.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.) - 1996 - University of California Press.
    _Essays on Aristotle's_ Rhetoric offers a fresh and comprehensive assessment of a classic work. Aristotle's influence on the practice and theory of rhetoric, as it affects political and legal argumentation, has been continuous and far-reaching. This anthology presents Aristotle's _Rhetoric_ in its original context, providing examples of the kind of oratory whose success Aristotle explains and analyzes. The contributors—eminent philosophers, classicists, and critics—assess the role and the techniques of rhetorical persuasion in philosophic discourse and in the public sphere. They connect (...)
     
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  43.  12
    Experiments in Philosophic Genre: Descartes' "Meditations".Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1983 - Critical Inquiry 9 (3):545-564.
    It would be pretty to think that Descartes’ Meditations is itself a structured transformation of the meditational mode, starting with the dominance of an intellectual, ascensional mode, moving through the penitential form, and ending with the analytic-architectonic mode. Unfortunately the text does not sustain such an easy resolution to our problems. Instead, we see that different modes seem dominant at different stages; their subterranean connections and relations remain unclear.We could try to construct a nesting of mask, face, and skeleton in (...)
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  44. Characters, Selves, Individuals.Amelie Oxenberg Rorty & Literary Postscript - 1976 - In Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), The Identities of Persons. University of California Press.
     
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  45. 1980.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1980 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press.
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  46.  14
    Self-Deception, Akrasia and Irrationality.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1985 - In Jon Elster (ed.), The Multiple Self. Cambridge University Press.
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  47.  27
    The Burdens of Love.Amelie Rorty - 2016 - The Journal of Ethics 20 (4):341-354.
    While we primarily love individual persons, we also love our work, our homes, our activities and causes. To love is to be engaged in an active concern for the objective well-being—the thriving—of whom and what we love. True love mandates discovering in what that well-being consists and to be engaged in the details of promoting it. Since our loves are diverse, we are often conflicted about the priorities among the obligations they bring. Loving requires constant contextual improvisatory adjustment of priorities (...)
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  48.  88
    Questioning Moral Theories.Amelie Rorty - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (1):29-46.
    Not a day passes but we find ourselves indignant about something or other. When is our indignation justified, and when does it count as moral indignation rather than a legitimate but non-moral gripe? You might think that we should turn to moral theories – to the varieties of utilitarian, Kantian, virtue theories, etc – to answer this question. I shall try to convince you that this is a mistake, that moral theory – as it is ordinarily presently conceived and studied (...)
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  49.  89
    On Being Rational.Amelie Rorty - 2009 - Ratio 22 (3):350-358.
    To be rational is to be engaged in collaborative, corrigible, historically informed inquiry and deliberation. Critical intelligence is merely the beginning of rationality. Substantive rationality also requires reflective and imaginative inquiry. Its active exercise presupposes trust and mandates a commitment to the common good, to responsible attempts to create the political institutions and social conditions on which intellectual and political trust can flourish. Without these, formal and calculative intelligence are – however brilliant – mere cleverness; and without these, rationality can (...)
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  50.  87
    The Social and Political Sources of Akrasia.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - 1997 - Ethics 107 (4):644-657.
    Akrasia is not always --or only-- a solitary failure to act on a person's judgment of what is, all things considered, best. Nor is it always a species of moral or ethical failure prompted by a form of irrationality. It is often prompted by social support and sustained by structuring political institutions.
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