Results for 'Amusement'

95 found
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  1.  4
    Understanding Lincoln, Ruth Anna Putnam.Is Amusement & Robert C. Roberts - 1988 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (2).
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  2.  27
    Is Amusement an Emotion?Robert C. Roberts - 1988 - American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (July):269-274.
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  3.  36
    The Function and Content of Amusement.Ward E. Jones - 2006 - South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):126-137.
    Once we establish that the fundamental subject matter of the study of humour is a mental state – which I will call finding funny – then it immediately follows that we need to find the content and function of this mental state. The main contender for the content of finding funny is the incongruous (the incongruity thesis ); the main contenders for the function of finding funny are grounded either in its generally being an enjoyable state (the gratification thesis ) (...)
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  4. Do Moral Flaws Enhance Amusement?Aaron Smuts - 2009 - American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):151-163.
    I argue that genuine moral flaws never enhance amusement, but they sometimes detract.I argue against comic immoralism--the position that moral flaws can make attempts at humor more amusing.Two common errors have made immoralism look attractive.First, immoralists have confused outrageous content with genuine moral flaws.Second, immoralists have failed to see that it is not sufficient to show that a morally flawed joke is amusing; they need to show that a joke can be more amusing because of the fact that it (...)
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  5.  9
    Family, Inner Life, and the Amusement Industry.Nicholas Reynolds - 2009 - Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):1-19.
    I critically engage Max Horkheimer’s “Art and Mass Culture” from Critical Theory. I split Horkheimer’s essay into three parts, which correspond to the three sections of my essay. The first section details the objective historical conditions that have lead up to Horkheimer’s diagnosis. The second section describes the change in consciousness that corresponds to these conditions, and the third section outlines Horkheimer’s critique of Mortimer Adler and art that belongs to “the amusement industry.” I describe the basic elements of (...)
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  6.  1
    Amusement and the Philosophy of Emotion: A Neuroanatomical Approach.Joseph T. Palencik - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (3):419-434.
    ABSTRACT: Philosophers who discuss the emotions have usually treated amusement as a non-emotional mental state. Two prominent philosophers making this claim are Henri Bergson and John Morreall, who maintain that amusement is too abstract and intellectual to qualify as an emotion. Here, the merit of this claim is assessed. Through recent work in neuroanatomy there is reason to doubt the legitimacy of dichotomies that separate emotion and the intellect. Findings suggest that the neuroanatomical structure of amusement is (...)
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  7.  17
    Amusement and the Philosophy of Emotion: A Neuroanatomical Approach.Joseph T. Palencik - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (3):419-434.
    Philosophers who discuss the emotions have usually treated amusement as a non-emotional mental state. Two prominent philosophers making this claim are Henri Bergson and John Morreall, who maintain that amusement is too abstract and intellectual to qualify as an emotion. Here, the merit of this claim is assessed. Through recent work in neuroanatomy there is reason to doubt the legitimacy of dichotomies that separate emotion and the intellect. Findings suggest that the neuroanatomical structure of amusement is similar (...)
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  8. May Amusement Serve as a Social Courage Engine?Kuba Kryś - 2010 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 41 (2):67-73.
    May Amusement Serve as a Social Courage Engine? According to Fredrickson's "Broaden-and-Built Theory of Positive Emotions" positive emotions have different effects in social life and are based on different mechanisms than negative emotions do. Moreover positive emotions vary among themselves - there are quality differences between them and they shall not be treated only as a single positive mood. Three simple studies presented here and inspired by the Fredrickson's theory demonstrate that amusement, in comparison to neutral condition as (...)
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  9. Amusement and the Philosophy of Emotion.Joseph T. Palencik - 2007 - Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review / Revue canadienne de philosophie 46 (3):419-434.
    ABSTRACT: Philosophers who discuss the emotions have usually treated amusement as a non-emotional mental state. Two prominent philosophers making this claim are Henri Bergson and John Morreall, who maintain that amusement is too abstract and intellectual to qualify as an emotion. Here, the merit of this claim is assessed. Through recent work in neuroanatomy there is reason to doubt the legitimacy of dichotomies that separate emotion and the intellect. Findings suggest that the neuroanatomical structure of amusement is (...)
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  10. Amusement and the Philosophy of Emotion: A Neuroanatomical Approach: Dialogue.Joseph T. Palencik - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (3):419-434.
    ABSTRACT Philosophers who discuss the emotions have usually treated amusement as a non-emotional mental state. Two prominent philosophers making this claim are Henri Bergson and John Morreall, who maintain that amusement is too abstract and intellectual to qualify as an emotion. Here, the merit of this claim is assessed. Through recent work in neuroanatomy there is reason to doubt the legitimacy of dichotomies that separate emotion and the intellect. Findings suggest that the neuroanatomical structure of amusement is (...)
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  11.  11
    That's Disgusting!…, but Very Amusing: Mixed Feelings of Amusement and Disgust.Scott H. Hemenover & Ulrich Schimmack - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (5):1102-1113.
  12.  60
    Ethics and Comic Amusement.Noël Carroll - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):241-253.
    This article explores several views on the relation of humour, especially tendentious humour, to morality, including comic amoralism, comic ethicism, comic immoralism, and moderate comic moralism. The essay concludes by defending moderate comic moralism.
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  13.  5
    “Sanguinary Amusement”: E. A. Freeman, the Comparative Method and Victorian Theories of Race.Vicky L. Morrisroe - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (1):27-56.
    This article seeks to revise the conventional portrait of the historian E. A. Freeman (1823–92) as an arch-racist and confident proponent of Aryan superiority. Focusing on the relatively obscure Comparative Politics (1873), it is argued that, while attitudes towards race were hardening in the later nineteenth century, Freeman combined the insights of the practitioners of the Comparative Method and the Liberal Anglican philosophy of Thomas Arnold to define the Aryan race as a community of culture rather than of blood. Explicitly (...)
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  14.  33
    Transgressive Comedy and Partiality: Making Sense of Our Amusement at His Girl Friday.W. Jones - 2011 - In Ward E. Jones & Samantha Vice (eds.), Ethics at the Cinema. Oxford University Press.
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  15.  18
    Instruction with Amusement.Judy Stove - 2007 - Renascence 60 (1):3-16.
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  16.  14
    Amusement, Delight, and Whimsy: Humor Has Its Reasons That Reason Cannot Ignore.E. K. Ackermann - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (3):405-411.
    Context: The idea for this article sprang from a desire to revive a conversation with the late Ernst von Glasersfeld on the heuristic function - and epistemological status - of forms of ideations that resist linguistic or empirical scrutiny. A close look into the uses of humor seemed a thread worth pursuing, albeit tenuous, to further explore some of the controversies surrounding the evocative power of the imaginal and other oblique forms of knowing characteristic of creative individuals. Problem: People generally (...)
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  17.  21
    Seven Reasons Why Amusement is an Emotion.Robert A. Sharpe - 1975 - Journal of Value Inquiry 9 (3):201-203.
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  18.  1
    Only Kidding: The Connection Between Amusement and Our Attitudes.E. M. Dadlez - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):1-16.
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  19.  3
    Deconstructing Austin’s Pragmatics: ‘An Idle Tea-Table Amusement’ or an Epistemological Solution to the Crisis of Representation?Marike Finlay - 1988 - Semiotica 68 (1-2):7-32.
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  20.  2
    Predators of Knowledge Construction: Interpreting Students' Metacognition in an Amusement Park Physics Program.David Anderson & Samson Nashon - 2007 - Science Education 91 (2):298-320.
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  21. Bougeant . - Amusement Philosophique Sur Le Langage Des Bêtes. [REVIEW]M. David - 1972 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 162:449.
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  22. L'Amusement philosophique sur le language des bêtes. [REVIEW]G. E. G. E. - 1956 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 10:283.
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  23. The Blossoms of Morality Intended for the Amusement and Instruction of Young Ladies and Gentlemen.Richard Johnson & John Bewick - 1801 - Printed by J. Jones.
     
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  24. Reise ins Reich der Unvernunft: Aufgeklärtes Amüsement bei Johann Christoph Adelung.Hanns-Peter Neumann - 2006 - In Sebastian Lalla, Anja Hallacker & Günter Frank (eds.), Erzählende Vernunft. Akademie Verlag. pp. 61-74.
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  25. Choice Emblems, Natural, Historical, Fabulous, Moral and Divine; for the Improvement and Pastime of Youth Serving to Display the Beauties and Morals of the Ancient Fabulists: The Whole Calculated to Convey the Golden Lessons of Instruction Under a New and More Delightful Dress. Written for the Amusement of the Right Honourable Lord Newbattle.John Huddlestone Wynne, J. Chapman & George Riley - 1775 - Printed by J. Chapman, ... For George Riley, ..
     
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  26. Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism.E. M. Dadlez - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1-17.
    Comparatively speaking, philosophy has not been especially long-winded in attempting to answer questions about what is funny and why we should think so. There is the standard debate of many centuries’ standing between superiority and incongruity accounts of humor, which for the most part attempt to identify the intentional objects of our amusement.1 There is the more recent debate about humor and morality, about whether jokes themselves may be regarded as immoral or about whether it can in certain circumstances (...)
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  27.  73
    Against the Moralistic Fallacy: A Modest Defense of a Modest Sentimentalism About Humor.Andrew Jordan & Stephanie Patridge - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):83-94.
    In a series of important papers, Justin D’Arms and Daniel Jacobson argue that all extant neo-sentimentalists are guilty of a conflation error that they call the moralistic fallacy. One commits the moralistic fallacy when one infers from the fact that it would be morally wrong to experience an affective attitude—e.g., it would be wrong to be amused—that the attitude does not fit its object—e.g., that it is not funny. Such inferences, they argue, conflate the appropriateness conditions of attitudinal responses with (...)
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  28. Just Joking: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Humor.Berys Nigel Gaut - 1998 - Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):51-68.
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  29.  88
    Humor as an Optics: Bergson and the Ethics of Humor.Martin Shuster - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):618-632.
    Although the ethics of humor is a relatively new field, it already seems to have achieved a consensus about ethics in general. In this paper, I implicitly (1) question the view of ethics that stands behind many discussions in the ethics of humor; I do this by explicitly (2) focusing on what has been a chief preoccupation in the ethics of humor: the evaluation of humor. Does the immoral content of a joke make it more or less humorous? Specifically, I (...)
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  30.  19
    Humor: The Beauty and the Beast.Glenn A. Hartz & Ralph Hunt - 1991 - American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):299 - 309.
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  31.  35
    Review of Simon Critchley, On Humour. [REVIEW]Aaron Smuts - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (4):414-416.
    The highlight of Simon Critchley's small book On Humor (2002) is the inclusion of seven beautiful prints by Charles Le Brun at the start of each chapter. Le Brun's captivating drawings are zoomorphic studies of the human face, each in relation to a different animal.
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  32. The Determinable-Determinate Relation.Eric Funkhouser - 2006 - Noûs 40 (3):548–569.
    The properties colored and red stand in a special relation. Namely, red is a determinate of colored, and colored is determinable relative to red. Many other properties are similarly related. The determination relation is an interesting topic of logical investigation in its own right, and the prominent philosophical inquiries into this relation have, accordingly, operated at a high level of abstraction.1 It is time to return to these investigations, not just as a logical amusement, but for the payoffs such (...)
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  33.  22
    Coherence Between Emotion and Facial Expression: Evidence From Laboratory Experiments.Rainer Reisenzein, Markus Studtmann & Gernot Horstmann - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):16-23.
    Evidence on the coherence between emotion and facial expression in adults from laboratory experiments is reviewed. High coherence has been found in several studies between amusement and smiling; low to moderate coherence between other positive emotions and smiling. The available evidence for surprise and disgust suggests that these emotions are accompanied by their “traditional” facial expressions, and even components of these expressions, only in a minority of cases. Evidence concerning sadness, anger, and fear is very limited. For sadness, one (...)
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  34. Transcendental Meditation and the Remaking of an Iowa Farm Town.Joseph Weber - 2014 - Utopian Studies 25 (2):341-358.
    At first blush, the town square in Fairfield, Iowa, seems no different from hundreds like it that grace small communities from New England to California. It has a pretty gazebo where bands play, a stretch of grass ideal for sunbathing, and a monument to historic local events, and all of it is surrounded by businesses that offer clothes, medicine, food, and, perhaps, a drink or two. Such town centers are so classically American that Disney and Hollywood have turned them into (...)
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  35. A Plea for Excuses.John Austin - 1956 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 57:1--30.
    The subject of this paper, Excuses, is one not to be treated, but only to be introduced, within such limits. It is, or might be, the name of a whole branch, even a ramiculated branch, of philosophy, or at least of one fashion of philosophy. I shall try, therefore, first to state what the subject is, why it is worth studying, and how it may be studied, all this at a regrettably lofty level: and then I shall illustrate, in more (...)
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  36. The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy.William Paley - 1785 - Garland.
    A major philosophical mind in his day, William Paley wrote in a lucid style that made complex ideas more accessible to a wide readership. This work, first published in 1785, was based on the lectures he gave on moral philosophy at Christ's College, Cambridge. Cited in parliamentary debates and remaining on the syllabus at Cambridge into the twentieth century, it stands as one of the most influential texts to emerge from the Enlightenment period in Britain. An orthodox theologian, grounding his (...)
     
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  37. The Philosophy of Laughter and Humor.John Morreall (ed.) - 1986 - State University of New York Press.
    This book assesses the adequacy of the traditional theories of laughter and humor, suggests revised theories, and explores such areas as the aesthetics and ethics of humor, and the relation of amusement to other mental states. Theories of laughter and humor originated in ancient times with the view that laughter is an expression of feelings of superiority over another person. This superiority theory was held by Plato, Aristotle, and Hobbes. Another aspect of laughter, noted by Aristotle and Cicero and (...)
     
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  38.  11
    Learning to Laugh at Ourselves: Humor, Self-Transcendence, and the Cultivation of Moral Virtues.Mordechai Gordon - 2010 - Educational Theory 60 (6):735-749.
    In this essay Mordechai Gordon begins to address the neglect of humor among philosophers of education by focusing on some interesting connections between humor, self‐transcendence, and the development of moral virtues. More specifically, he explores the kind of humor that makes fun of oneself and how it can affect educational encounters. Gordon begins his analysis by discussing the nature and purpose of humor in general, while distinguishing it from laughter and amusement. In the next part of the essay, he (...)
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  39. Why It is Wrong to Be Always Guided by the Best: Consequentialism and Friendship.Neera Badhwar Kapur - 1991 - Ethics 101 (3):483-504.
    I take friendship to be a practical and emotional relationship marked by mutual and (more-or-less) equal goodwill, liking, and pleasure. Friendship can exist between siblings, lovers, parent and adult child, as well as between otherwise unrelated people. Some friendships are valued chiefly for their usefulness. Such friendships are instrumental or means friendships. Other friendships are valued chiefly for their own sakes. Such friendships are noninstrumental or end friendships. In this paper I am concerned only with end friendships, and the challenge (...)
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  40.  85
    Humor and the Virtues.Robert C. Roberts - 1988 - Inquiry 31 (2):127 – 149.
    Five dimensions of amusement are ethically searched: incongruity, perspectivity, dissociation, enjoyment, and freshness. Amusement perceives incongruities and virtues are formally congruities between one's character and one's nature. An ethical sense of humor is a sense for incongruities between people's behavior and character, and their telos. To appreciate any humor one must adopt a perspective, and in the case of ethical amusement this is the standpoint of one who possesses the virtues. In being amused at the incongruity of (...)
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  41.  9
    Humour is a Funny Thing.Alan Roberts - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (4):355-366.
    This paper considers the question of how immoral elements in instances of humour affect funniness. Comic ethicism is the position that each immoral element negatively affects funniness and if their cumulative effect is sufficient, then funniness is eliminated. I focus on Berys Gaut’s central argument in favour of comic ethicism; the merited response argument. In this journal, Noël Carroll has criticized the merited response argument as illegitimately conflating comic merit with moral merit. I argue that the merited response argument, and (...)
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  42.  68
    The King of Pain.Ward E. Jones - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 47 (47):79-84.
    Dark comedies invite us to laugh at something which is, at least ostensibly, not funny at all. They take an act or event that would, under most descriptions or presentations, invite pity or anger, and give it characteristics that invite amusement. It is essential to the humour of the kidnapping in The King of Comedy that it is a kidnapping. The immorality of this event is crucial to its humour.
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  43.  96
    The Road to Objects.Graham Harman - 2011 - Continent 3 (1):171-179.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  44.  69
    Cruelty's Rewards: The Gratifications of Perpetrators and Spectators.Victor Nell - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):211-224.
    Cruelty is the deliberate infliction of physical or psychological pain on other living creatures, sometimes indifferently, but often with delight. Though cruelty is an overwhelming presence in the world, there is no neurobiological or psychological explanation for its ubiquity and reward value. This target article attempts to provide such explanations by describing three stages in the development of cruelty. Stage 1 is the development of the predatory adaptation from the Palaeozoic to the ethology of predation in canids, felids, and primates. (...)
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  45.  2
    Who is Afraid of Commitment? On the Relation of Scientific Evidence and Conceptual Theory.Steffen Steinert & Joachim Lipski - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-24.
    Can scientific evidence prompt us to revise philosophical theories or folk theoretical accounts of phenomena of the mind? We will argue that it can—but only under the condition that they make a so-called ‘ontological commitment’ to something that is actually subject to empirical inquiry. In other words, scientific evidence pertaining to neuroanatomical structure or causal processes only has a refuting effect if philosophical theories and folk notions subscribe to either account. We will illustrate the importance of ‘ontological commitment’ with the (...)
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  46. The Salacious and the Satirical: In Defense of Symmetric Comic Moralism.Aaron Smuts - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):45-62.
    A common view holds that humor and morality are antithetical: Moral flaws enhance amusement, and moral virtues detract. I reject both of these claims. If we distinguish between merely outrageous jokes and immoral jokes, the problems with the common view become apparent. What we find is that genuine morals flaws tend to inhibit amusement. Further, by looking at satire, we can see that moral virtues sometimes enhance amusement. The position I defend is called symmetric comic moralism. It (...)
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  47.  8
    Superiority in Humor Theory.Sheila Lintott - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (4):347-358.
    In this article, I consider the standard interpretation of the superiority theory of humor attributed to Plato, Aristotle, and Hobbes, according to which the theory allegedly places feelings of superiority at the center of humor and comic amusement. The view that feelings of superiority are at the heart of all comic amusement is wildly implausible. Therefore textual evidence for the interpretation of Plato, Aristotle, or Hobbes as offering the superiority theory as an essentialist theory of humor is worth (...)
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  48.  22
    Collision. Bass Pro Shops, Environmental Thought, and the Animatronic Dead.Christina M. Colvin - 2015 - Evental Aesthetics 4 (2):105-115.
    This essay collides with the aesthetic of wilderness cultivated by the North American retail chain Bass Pro Shops. Through elaborate displays and décor that render each store part rustic lodge, aquarium, amusement park, natural history museum, and hunting simulator, the stores represent the natural world and its inhabitants as abundant resources for human consumption. The stores’ aesthetic is primarily wrought through the arrangement of taxidermied animals. These animals include both traditional wildlife mounts posed in lifelike attitudes as well as (...)
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  49.  30
    Emotional Analogies and Analogical Inference.Paul Thagard & Cameron Shelley - unknown
    Despite the growing appreciation of the relevance of affect to cognition, analogy researchers have paid remarkably little attention to emotion. This paper discusses three general classes of analogy that involve emotions. The most straightforward are analogies and metaphors about emotions, for example "Love is a rose and you better not pick it." Much more interesting are analogies that involve the transfer of emotions, for example in empathy in which people understand the emotions of others by imagining their own emotional reactions (...)
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  50.  28
    The Incongruity of Incongruity Theories of Humor.Tomáš Kulka - 2007 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 14 (3):320-333.
    The article critically reviews the Incongruity Theory of Humor reaching the conclusion that it has to be essentially restructured. Leaving aside the question of scope, it is shown that the theory is inadequate even for those cases for which it is thought to be especially well suited – that it cannot account either for the pleasurable effect of jokes or for aesthetic pleasure. I argue that it is the resolution of the incongruity rather than its mere apprehension, which is that (...)
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