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Profile: Amy Allen (Pennsylvania State University)
  1.  98
    The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2007 - Columbia University Press.
    Introduction : the politics of our selves -- Foucault, subjectivity, and the enlightenment : a critical reappraisal -- The impurity of practical reason : power and autonomy in Foucault -- Dependency, subordination, and recognition : Butler on subjection -- Empowering the lifeworld? autonomy and power in Habermas -- Contextualizing critical theory -- Engendering critical theory.
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  2. The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity.Amy Allen - 1999 - Westview Press.
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression. In "The Power of Feminist Theory," Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of theorists of power, including (...)
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  3. Discourse, Power, and Subjectivation: The Foucault/Habermas Debate Reconsidered.Amy Allen - 2009 - Philosophical Forum 40 (1):1-28.
    In this article, I take up one strand – arguably the central one – of the Foucault/Habermas debate: their respective accounts of subjectivation. Against those who hold that Foucault and Habermas occupy such drastically different theoretical perspectives as to preclude the integration of their views into a common framework, I begin to lay the groundwork for an account of subjectivation that draws on the conceptual insights to be found on each side of the debate. While both Foucault and Habermas offer (...)
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  4.  65
    Power Trouble: Performativity as Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 1998 - Constellations 5 (4):456-471.
    Although Judith Butler’s theory of the performativity of gender has been highly influential in feminist theory, queer theory, cultural studies, and some areas of philosophy, it has yet to receive its due from critical social theorists. This oversight is especially problematic given the crucial insights into the study of power – a central concept for critical social theory – that can be gleaned from Butler’s work. Her analysis is somewhat unique among discussions of power in its attempt to theorize simultaneously (...)
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  5. Power, Subjectivity, and Agency: Between Arendt and Foucault.Amy Allen - 2002 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (2):131 – 149.
    In this article, I argue for bringing the work of Michel Foucault and Hannah Arendt into dialogue with respect to the links between power, subjectivity, and agency. Although one might assume that Foucault and Arendt come from such radically different philosophical starting points that such a dialogue would be impossible, I argue that there is actually a good deal of common ground to be found between these two thinkers. Moreover, I suggest that Foucault's and Arendt's divergent views about the role (...)
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  6.  13
    The Entanglement of Power and Validity : Foucault and Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2010 - In Timothy O'Leary & Christopher Falzon (eds.), Foucault and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 78--98.
  7. Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection. [REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2005 - Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue that her (...)
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  8. Systematically Distorted Subjectivity?: Habermas and the Critique of Power.Amy R. Allen - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):641-650.
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  9. Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice.Amy Allen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 156-172.
    This paper examines Young’s conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete, in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘ oppression ’ and ‘domination’. Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. Allen concludes by considering one way in which Young’s analysis (...)
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  10.  9
    Progress, Normativity, and the Dynamics of Social Change.Amy Allen, Rahel Jaeggi & Eva Von Redecker - 2016 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 37 (2):225-251.
  11.  76
    Rethinking Power.Amy Allen - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (1):21 - 40.
    This paper argues that feminists have yet to develop a satisfactory account of power. Existing feminist accounts of power tend to have a one-sided emphasis either on power as domination or on power as empowerment. This conceptual one-sided-ness must be overcome if feminists are to develop an account complex enough to illuminate women's diverse experiences with power. Such an account is sketched here.
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  12.  84
    Foucault and Enlightenment: A Critical Reappraisal.Amy Allen - 2003 - Constellations 10 (2):180-198.
    In a late discussion of Kant’s essay, “Was ist Aufklärung?,” Foucault credits Kant with posing “the question of his own present” and positions himself as an inheritor of this Kantian legacy.1 Foucault has high praise for the critical tradition that emerges from Kant’s historical-political reflections on the Enlightenment and the French Revolution; Kant’s concern in these writings with “an ontology of the present, an ontology of ourselves” is, he says, characteristic of “a form of philosophy, from Hegel, through Nietzsche and (...)
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  13. The Anti-Subjective Hypothesis: Michel Foucault and the Death of the Subject.Amy Allen - 2000 - Philosophical Forum 31 (2):113–130.
    The centerpiece of the first volume of Michel Foucault’s History of Sexuality is the analysis of what Foucault terms the “repressive hypothesis,” the nearly universal assumption on the part of twentieth-century Westerners that we are the heirs to a Victorian legacy of sexual repression. The supreme irony of this belief, according to Foucault, is that the whole time that we have been announcing and denouncing our repressed, Victorian sexuality, discourses about sexuality have actually proliferated. Paradoxically, as Victorian as we allegedly (...)
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  14. Solidarity After Identity Politics: Hannah Arendt and the Power of Feminist Theory.Amy Allen - 1999 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (1):97-118.
    This paper argues that Hannah Arendt's political theory offers key insights into the power that binds together the feminist movement - the power of solidarity. Second-wave feminist notions of solidarity were grounded in notions of shared identity; in recent years, as such conceptions of shared identity have come under attack for being exclusionary and repressive, feminists have been urged to give up the idea of solidarity altogether. However, the choice between (repressive) identity and (fragmented) non-identity is a false opposition, and (...)
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  15.  33
    The Unforced Force of the Better Argument: Reason and Power in Habermas' Political Theory.Amy Allen - 2012 - Constellations 19 (3):353-368.
    The tension between reason and power has a long and illustrious history in political theory. In his magnum opus of legal and political theory, "Between Facts and Norms," Jürgen Habermas presents his most complex, sophisticated, and ambitious attempt to confront this tension. My thesis in this article is that though Habermas’s political theory thematizes the tension between reason and power in a way that is initially quite promising, he ultimately forecloses that tension in the direction of a rationality that has (...)
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  16. Pornography and Power.Amy Allen - 2001 - Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):512–531.
    When it was at its height, the feminist pornography debate tended to generate more heat than light. Only now that there has been a cease fire in the sex war does it seem possible to reflect on the debate in a more productive way and to address some of the questions that were left unresolved by it. In this paper, I shall argue that one of the major unresolved questions is that of how feminists should conceptualize power. The antipornography feminists (...)
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  17.  27
    Foucault and the Politics of Our Selves.Amy Allen - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (4):43-59.
    Exploring the apparent tension between Foucault’s analyses of technologies of domination – the ways in which the subject is constituted by power–knowledge relations – and of technologies of the self – the ways in which individuals constitute themselves through practices of freedom – this article endeavors to makes two points: first, the interpretive claim that Foucault’s own attempts to analyse both aspects of the politics of our selves are neither contradictory nor incoherent; and, second, the constructive claim that Foucault’s analysis (...)
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  18. Feminist Narratives and Social/Political Change.Amy Allen - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (4):127-132.
    Lara, Maria Pia, Moral Textures: Feminist Narratives in the Public Sphere (reviewed by Amy Allen).
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  19.  83
    Feminist Perspectives on Power.Amy Allen - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  20.  3
    Prague: Twenty Years Later.Amy Allen - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (3):270-271.
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  21.  27
    Are We Driven? Critical Theory and Psychoanalysis Reconsidered.Amy Allen - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (4):311-328.
    If, as Axel Honneth has recently argued, critical theory needs psychoanalysis for meta-normative and explanatory reasons, this does not settle the question of which version of psychoanalysis critical theorists should embrace. In this paper, I argue against Honneth's favoured version – an intersubjectivist interpretation of Winnicott's object-relations theory – and in favour of an alternative based on the drive-theoretical work of Melanie Klein. Klein's work, I argue, provides critical theorists with a more realistic conception of the person and a richer (...)
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  22.  34
    Emancipation Without Utopia: Subjection, Modernity, and the Normative Claims of Feminist Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (3):513-529.
    Feminist theory needs both explanatory-diagnostic and anticipatory-utopian moments in order to be truly critical and truly feminist. However, the explanatory-diagnostic task of analyzing the workings of gendered power relations in all of their depth and complexity seems to undercut the very possibility of emancipation on which the anticipatory-utopian task relies. In this paper, I take this looming paradox as an invitation to rethink our understanding of emancipation and its relation to the anticipatory-utopian dimensions of critique, asking what conception of emancipation (...)
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  23.  22
    Book Review: The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens by Seyla Benhabib. [REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2007 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (2):200-204.
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  24.  16
    History, Critique, and Freedom: The Historical a Priori in Husserl and Foucault.Andreea Smaranda Aldea & Amy Allen - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (1):1-11.
  25.  18
    Reconstruction or Deconstruction?: A Reply to Johanna Meehan.Amy Allen - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (3):53-60.
    I argue that Johanna Meehan's call to examine the extra-linguistic psychic, affective and biological dimensions of gender identity is extremely important both for feminist theory in particular and for contemporary Continental philosophy in general. However, I suspect that such an examination might necessitate more than a mere expansion or reconstruction of Habermas' views; on the contrary, I suggest that Meehan's line of argument might lead instead toward a radical deconstruction of Habermasian critical theory. Key Words: feminism • Habermas • identity (...)
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  26.  5
    Allison Weir. Identities and Freedom: Feminist Theory Between Power and Connection. [REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2014 - Philosophia: A Journal of Feminist Continental Philosophy 4 (2):250-255.
  27.  28
    The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens (Review).Amy Allen - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):200-204.
  28.  13
    Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice.Amy Allen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):156-172.
    In this paper, I examine Iris Marion Young's conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘oppression’ and ‘domination.’ Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. I conclude by considering one way in which (...)
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  29.  59
    Scholar's Symposium: The Work of Angela Y. Davis. [REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (4):311-321.
  30.  50
    Book Review: The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens by Seyla Benhabib. [REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):200-204.
  31.  6
    Psychoanalysis and the Methodology of Critique.Amy Allen - 2016 - Constellations 23 (2):244-254.
    In his account of critical theory as diagnosing social pathologies of reason, Axel Honneth has rehabilitated the analogy between critical theory and psychoanalysis – according to which the critical theorist stands in relation to the pathological social order as the analyst stands in relation to the analysand, and the aim of critical theory is to effect the diagnosis and, ultimately, the cure of social disorders or pathologies. In this article, I show that Honneth, like Habermas before him, has an overly (...)
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  32.  25
    Feminism, Foucault, and the Critique of Reason: Re-Reading the History of Madness.Amy Allen - 2013 - Foucault Studies 16:15-31.
    This paper situates Lynne Huffer’s recent queer-feminist Foucaultian critique of reason within the context of earlier feminist debates about reason and critically assesses Huffer’s work from the point of view of its faithfulness to Foucault’s work and its implications for feminism. I argue that Huffer’s characterization of Enlightenment reason as despotic not only departs from Foucault’s account of the relationship between power and reason, it also leaves her stuck in the same double binds that plagued earlier feminist critiques of reason. (...)
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  33.  15
    Foucault's Debt to Hegel.Amy Allen - 1998 - Philosophy Today 42 (1):71-78.
  34.  31
    Sandra Bartky, “Sympathy and Solidarity” and Other Essays:“Sympathy and Solidarity” and Other Essays.Amy Allen - 2005 - Ethics 115 (3):599-601.
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  35.  5
    Normativity, Power, and Gender.Amy Allen - 2014 - Critical Horizons 15 (1):52-68.
    In this paper, I respond to the critiques of my book, "The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory," made by Nikolas Kompridis, Paul Patton, Allison Weir and Moira Gatens. My response is organized around three overlapping themes that are raised in these four astute papers: a defense of my account of normativity, of my reading of Foucault’s conception of power, and of my analysis of gender subordination/identity.
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  36.  8
    Herrschaft Begreifen: Anerkennung Und Macht in Axel Honneths Kritischer Theorie.Amy Allen - 2014 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 62 (2):260-278.
    Axel Honneth frames his contribution to the tradition of critical theory as an attempt to do justice to both the structures of social domination in contemporary Western societies and the practical resources for their overcoming. This paper assesses how well Honneth’s critical theory, which centers on the notion of the struggle for recognition, accomplishes the first of these two tasks. I argue that Honneth has yet to offer a fully satisfactory analysis of domination because his recognition model is unable to (...)
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  37.  19
    Race, Empire and the Idea of Human Development by Thomas McCarthy.Amy Allen - 2011 - Constellations 18 (3):487-492.
  38.  23
    Re-Presenting the Good Society by Maeve Cooke.Amy Allen - 2008 - Constellations 15 (4):587-590.
  39.  12
    Introduction.Amy Allen & Anthony Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):217-219.
    This is an introduction to a volume of essays bringing together some of the highlights from the fifty-first annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy (SPEP) at the Rochester Institute of Technology and Nazareth College from November 1-3, 2012. Our keynote speakers for the 2012 meeting were Adriana Cavarero and László Tengelyi, and we lead off this issue with their essays.
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  40.  23
    Review of Thomas Flynn, Sartre, Foucault and Historical Reason, Volume 2: A Poststructuralist Mapping of History[REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (2).
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  41.  5
    Introduction.Amy Allen & Brian Schroeder - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (3):261-264.
    This is an introduction to a volume of articles containing highlights from the fifty-third Annual Meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy (SPEP) hosted by Loyola University–New Orleans with Tulane University from October 23–25, 2014. Many of the articles included here mine the rich and productive vein of post-Kantian critical philosophy that inspires so much work in Continental philosophy; hence the title of our volume is “Legacies of Critique.” The volume opens with the “Co-director’s Address” by outgoing SPEP (...)
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  42.  7
    Introduction.Amy Allen & Anthony Steinbock - 2014 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (3):213-218.
    This is an introduction to a volume of articles containing highlights from the fifty-second annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy (SPEP) at the University of Oregon from October 24–26, 2013. All three of the plenary sessions for this conference constituted reflections on limits of various kinds: the limits of conceptual thinking, the limits of continental philosophy understood as a kind of post-Kantian quasi-transcendental enterprise, and the idea that SPEP’s guiding orientation is an openness to experience that (...)
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  43.  13
    Justice and Reconciliation: The Death of the Prison?Amy Allen - 2007 - Human Studies 30 (4):311 - 321.
  44.  2
    Spinoza. Portrait of a Spiritual Hero.J. L. B., Rudolf Kayser, Amy Allen & Maxim Newmark - 1947 - Journal of Philosophy 44 (7):192.
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  45.  10
    Review of Hans-Christoph Schmidt Am Busch, Christopher F. Zurn (Eds.), The Philosophy of Recognition: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives[REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (9).
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  46.  2
    SPEP Co-Director's Address.Amy Allen - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (3):265-282.
    The topic of my remarks is progress, but I should note at the outset that I have structured this article as something like a theme with variations, rather than a tightly interconnected, progressive argument. I am interested in problematizing how the concept of progress is deployed across a range of discussions. I start with the role of progress in my own field of critical social theory, and then move on to consider the idea of philosophical progress, and finally connect this (...)
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  47.  8
    Introduction.Amy Allen - 2002 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (2):119 – 121.
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  48. Feminism and the Subject of Politics.Amy Allen - 2009 - In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  49. Feminism and the Subject of Politics Amy Allen.Amy Allen - 2009 - In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 1.
     
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  50. The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    While post- and decolonial theorists have thoroughly debunked the idea of historical progress as a Eurocentric, imperialist, and neocolonialist fallacy, many of the most prominent contemporary thinkers associated with the Frankfurt School--Jürgen Habermas, Axel Honneth, and Rainer Forst--have persistently defended ideas of progress, development, and modernity and have even made such ideas central to their normative claims. Can the Frankfurt School's goal of radical social change survive this critique? And what would a decolonized critical theory look like? Amy Allen fractures (...)
     
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