Results for 'Amy Day Ing'

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  1.  10
    The Process of Ethical Decision-Making: Experts Vs Novices.Thomas Van Valey, David Hartmann, Wayne Fuqua, Andrew Evans, Amy Day Ing, Amanda Meyer, Karolina Staros & Chris Walmsley - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):45-60.
    As one approach to examining the way ethical decisions are made, we asked experts and novices to review a set of scenarios that depict some important ethical (...)
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  2.  47
    Moral Exemplars in the Analects: The Good Person is That by Amy Olberding (Review).Michael Ing - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):439-442.
    In Moral Exemplars in the Analects, Amy Olberding offers a self-reflexive and thought-provoking interpretation of the Analects. Scholars of China will find her book valuable in (...) that it provides a holistic reading of the Analects that preserves the tensions in the text. Ethicists will find it valuable in that it furthers discussion on the role of emulating paradigmatic figures in moral development.Olberding characterizes her project as an attempt to "discern a governing logic that renders the Analects' compelling moral sensibility intelligible as moral theory" (p. 1). The difficulty of interpreting the Analects, Olberding explains, is that the text does not offer an explicit moral theory. Instead it reads more like .. (shrink)
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  3.  9
    The Process of Ethical Decision-Making: Experts Vs Novices.Chris Walmsley, Karolina Staros, Amanda Meyer, Amy Ing, Andrew Evans, Wayne Fuqua, David Hartmann & Thomas Valey - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):45-60.
    As one approach to examining the way ethical decisions are made, we asked experts and novices to review a set of scenarios that depict some important ethical (...)
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  4.  36
    Bhopal, India and Union Carbide: The Second Tragedy[REVIEW]R. Clayton Trotter, Susan G. Day & Amy E. Love - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):439-454.
    The paper examines the legal, ethical, and public policy issues involved in the Union Carbide gas leak in India which caused the deaths of over 3000 people (...)
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  5.  7
    Food and Everyday Life.Thomas M. Conroy, J. Nikol Beckham, Hui-tun Chuang, Matthew Day, Stephanie Greene, Joanna Henryks, Stacy M. Jameson, Marianne LeGreco, David Livert, Irina D. Mihalache, Roblyn Rawlins, Zachary Schrank, Klara Seddon, Amy Singer, Derek B. Shaw & Bethaney Turner (eds.) - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    This book is a qualitative, interpretive, phenomenological, and interdisciplinary, examination of food and food practices and their meanings in the modern world. Each chapter thematically focuses upon (...)
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  6.  36
    Compromise: J. P. Day.J. P. Day - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (250):471-485.
    Human conflict and its resolution is obviously a subject of great practical importance. Equally obviously, it is a vast subject, ranging from total war at one end (...)
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  7.  37
    Towards a History From Antiquity to the Renaissance of Sundials and Other Instruments for Reckoning Time by the Sun and Stars H ESTER H IGTON, SundialsAn Illustrated History of Portable Dials. London: Philip Wilson, 2001. Reviewed by D AVID A. K ING, Institute for the History of Science, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, D60054 Frankfurt Am Main, Germany H ESTER H IGTON, with Contributions From S ILKE A CKERMANN, R ICHARD D UNN, K IYOSHI T AKADA and A NTHONY T URNER, Sundials at GreenwichA Catalogue of the Sundials, Horary Quadrants and Nocturnals in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Oxford: Oxford University Press, and Greenwich: National Maritime Museum, 2002[REVIEW]D. Avid Ak Ing - 2004 - Annals of Science 61 (3):375-388.
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  8.  39
    Dorothy Days Friendship with Helene Iswolsky.Dorothy Day - 2008 - The Chesterton Review 34 (1/2):289-292.
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  9.  31
    Dorothy Day on the Duty of Delight.Dorothy Day - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):276-277.
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  10.  17
    Individual Liberty: J. P. Day.J. P. Day - 1983 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 15:17-29.
    The philosophical problems of liberty may be classified as those of definition, of justification and of distribution. They are so complex that there is a danger of (...)
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  11.  11
    An Economic History of Athens Under Roman Domination. By J. Day. Pp. Xii + 300. New York: Columbia University Press, 1942. 23s. 6d[REVIEW]F. M. Heichelheim & J. Day - 1943 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 63:130-131.
  12. Spontaneity & the Pattern of Things the Zirán and Wùshi of Wáng Chong's Lun Héng by M. Henri Day.Ch'ung Wang & M. Henri Day - 1972
     
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  13. A Companion to Ramon Llull and Lullism Ed. by Amy M. Austin and Mark D. Johnston.J. Isaac Goff - 2019 - Franciscan Studies 77 (1):284-286.
    This volume makes an excellent and very important contribution to English-language scholarship on the life, thought, and influence of the Majorcan lay theologian and philosopher, Ramon (...)Llull, the Doctor Illuminatus, from his own day through the Renaissance period into the European exploration of the New World. Llull was a brilliant but idiosyncratic thinker, whose interests and writings touched upon, it seems, every major theological and philosophical theme of his day as well as many topics that only would gain greater interest in later centuries. The editors, Amy M. Austin and Mark D. Johnston, in their preface to the volume note right away the main obstacles contemporary (especially... (shrink)
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  14.  16
    Regret and Moral Maturity: A Response to Michael Ing and Manyul Im.Amy Olberding - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):579-587.
    This essay elaborates on my essay, “ConfuciusComplaints and the AnalectsAccount of the Good Life,” responding to issues and criticisms raised by Michael Ing and Manyul (...)
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  15.  18
    Macrohistory and Globalization.Leonid Grinin - 2012 - Uchitel Publishing House.
    The present monograph considers some macrohistorical trends along with the aspects of globalization. Macrohistory is history on the large scale that tells the story of the entire (...)
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  16.  54
    MoralLock-Inin Responsible Innovation: The Ethical and Social Aspects of Killing Day-Old Chicks and Its Alternatives.M. R. N. Bruijnis, V. Blok, E. N. Stassen & H. G. J. Gremmen - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):939-960.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that will help in understanding and evaluating, along social and ethical lines, the issue of killing (...)
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  17.  81
    A Naturalist Definition of Art.Denis Dutton - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):367–377.
    Aesthetic theoriesmayclaim universality, but they are normally conditioned by the aesthetic issues and debates of their own times. Plato and Aristo- tle were motivated both to account (...)
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  18. Rethinking Temporality in Education Drawing Upon the Philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze: A Chiasmic Be(Com)Ing.Susanne Westman & Eva Alerby - 2012 - Childhood and Philosophy 8 (16):355-377.
    The children of today live in a time when the images of themselves and their childhood, their needs, interests, and skills, are discussed, researched, challenged, and changed. (...)
     
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  19.  25
    Information Rights: Trust and Human Dignity in E-Government.Toni Carbo - 2007 - International Review of Information Ethics 7 (9):1-7.
    The wordsRights,‖ ―Trust,‖ ―Human Dignity,‖ and evenGovernmenthave widely varying meanings and connotations, differing across time, languages and cultures. Concepts of rights, trust, and human (...)
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  20. Groundhog Day and the Good Life.Diana Abad - 2012 - Film-Philosophy 16 (1):149-164.
    Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 One of the most important questions of moral philosophy is what makes a life a good life. A good way (...)
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  21.  51
    Is Getting Well Ever An Art?’: Psychopharmacology and Madness in Robert Lowells Day by Day[REVIEW]Isabelle Travis - 2011 - Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):315-324.
    On the publication of Robert Lowells Life Studies in 1959, some critics were shocked by the poets use of seemingly frank autobiographical material, in particular the (...) portrayal of his hospitalizations for bipolar disorder. During the late fifties and throughout the sixties, a rich vein, influenced by Lowell , developed in American poetry. Also during this time, the nascent science of psychopharmacology competed with and complemented the more established somatic treatments, such as psychosurgery, shock treatments, and psychoanalytical therapies. The development of Thorazine was a remarkable breakthrough allowing patients previously thought incurable to leave hospital. In 1955, the release of Miltown, the firstminortranquilizer, was heralded with a media fanfare promising a new dawn of psychological cure-all. These two events blurred the boundary betweennormalityand madness by making treatment in the community more widely possible and by medicalizing more commonplace distress. Lowells early depictions of madness situate it as emblematic of the cultural malaise ofthe tranquilized fifties. ’ By his final collection, Day by Day (1977), mental illness had lost its symbolic power. These late poems explore the power of art as a way of representing and remedying suffering in a culture where psychopharmacology has normalized madness. (shrink)
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  22.  16
    The Limits of Amy Allen's Analysis of Gender Subordination in The Politics of Our Selves.Yara Frateschi - 2018 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 63 (1):341.
    Neste artigo, argumento que a abordagem de Amy Allen a respeito da questão de gênero em The Politics of Our Selves é precária e parcial na medida (...)
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  23.  21
    Evaluation of Medication Errors Via a Computerized Physician Order Entry System in an Inpatient Renal Transplant Unit.K. Marfo, D. Garcia, S. Khalique, K. Berger & A. Lu - 2011 - Transplant Research and Risk Management 2011.
    Kwaku Marfo, Danielle Garcia, Saira Khalique, Karen Berger, Amy LuMontefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USABackground: Medication errors are a prime concern for all in healthcare. As such (...)
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  24.  31
    Investigative Poetics: In (Night)-Light of Akilah Oliver.Feliz Molina - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):70-75.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 70-75. cartography of ghosts . . . And as a way to talk . . . of temporality the topography of imagination, this body whose dirty entry (...) into the articulation of history as rapturous becoming & unbecoming, greeted with violence, i take permission to extend this graceAkilah Oliver fromAn Arriving Guard of Angels Thusly Coming To GreetOur disappearance is already here. —Jacques Derrida, 117 I wrestled with death as a threshold, an aporia, a bandit, a part of life. —Akilah Oliver Moraine in geological lingo is that which is left behind. Moraine- a euphemism for the de-stabilizing referent of the writer-ly body as atroubled and troubling landscape marked by cultural and historical signifiers, the body as flesh memory [...] the body as transitory” (Oliver, Author Statement). Morainea geological metaphor of the poet as a holder of memory, as an accumulation of rocks and debris carried along the edge, terminal, dropped at the foot of language (in language). “Flesh Memoryaccording to Akilah Oliver is "that which my body recalls [...] everything has to do with the task of remembrance and its narrative reinvention [...] I was always translating an idea of the world as it presented itself at any given time. To write was a choice about how to be seen, how to enter the world as translator, actor, participant, in the dialogues that apparently made the real 'real'" (Levitsky). Flesh. Memory. The stuff some poems are made from. The stuff that gets abandoned, gleaned, and picked up by more flesh and memory. "My body, my life has always felt like a kaleidoscopic rip in the dominant fabric [...] has always been a dialogue with the impossible and the apparent” (Levitsky). The impossible-body or poet's body anticipates and performs (through language) an irretrievable death. IN APORIA I realized everything I must have been doing must have been Death. It was Christmas or Labor Daya holidayand every time you turned on the radio they said something likefour millionorgoing to die’.” — Andy Warhol Im trying on egos, [a justification for the planets continuance]. Oh hello transgressor, youve come to collect utilitarian debts, humbling narrative space. Give me condition and wheatgrass, I his body disintegrating. I his body is ossification. Death my habit radius, yeah yeah. I his body cant refuse this summons. I cant get out this fucking room. Tell me something different about torture dear Trickster. Tell me about the lightness my mother told me to pick the one i love the best how it signals everything I ever wish to believe true just holy on my ship. I jump all over this house. this is it [what I thought is thought only, nothing more deceptive than]: I his body keeps thinking someone will come along, touch me. As like human or lima bean. Im cradling you to my breast, you are looking out. A little wooden lion you & Peter carve on Bluff Street is quieting across your cheekbone. Not at all like the kind of terror found in sleep, on trembling grounds. It is yesterday now. I have not had a chance to dance in this century. Tonight I shall kill someone, a condition to remember Sunday morning. To think of lives as repetitions [rather than singular serial incarnations]. To understand your death is as exacerbating as trying to figure out why as schoolchildren in mid-nineteen-sixties Southern California we performed reflexive motions: cutting out lace snowflakes, reading Dick and Jane search for their missing mittens, imagining snow. Disintegrat ing . The -ing gerund catapults from the non-finite verb into past, present, future. The -ing as a tail pinned to death, a dog spinning to bite and never fully reaching itself, always shy of the end, circumreferential; a double copulative: deathing. Possessively AO calls ithabit radius” (a virtual fetish attribute) or an inescapable death presence thatconfronts us with the paradox of an unattainable object [...] through its being unattainable” (Agamben, 27). A flirtation or dialogue with an unknowable thing and aporia utilized as investigative instrument to engage (death) while (in Southern California) weperform reflexive motions,” cut lace snowflakes, imagine snow, and pay rent likeyeah, yeahwhat else is new. And this too, fiction. The book I wish to right. The restored fallen, heroic. Did you expect a different grace from the world? Or upon exit? Im working ontough.” They think I am already. All ready. Who is the dead person? Is "I'm sorry" real to a dead person? Browning grass. My hands on this table. A contentious century. A place to pay rent. Redemptive moments. Am I now the dead person? Dead person, dead person, will you partake in my persimmon feast? The body inside the body astounds, confesses sins of the funhouse. I too have admired the people of this planet. Their frilly, orderly intellects. The use theyve made of cardamom, radiation as well. How theyve pasteurized milk, loaned surnames to stars, captured tribes, diseases, streets, and ideas too. The living-body as archive: is it possible to experience the living-body as archive without a (kind of) death? Sifting the rubble, rummaging through hoarded debris, skin sheds, memory-napping, and re-awoken (in flesh and) on terrain. “An investigative poetics seeks to unravel staid communities of thought and grasp at what might always be just beyond reach; a poetics of inquiry that lies between language as meaning, and language as rapturous entry into the world of posited ideas and idealism”( Levitsky). Something snaps. Lights blow out prior to embarking upon an investigative poetics. It begins with a question (often a sexy aporia) that leads to openings. "Every politics of memory [...] implies an intervention of the state. It's a state that legislates and acts with regard to the nonfinite mass of materials to be stored, materials which must be collected, preserved” (Derrida & Stiegler, 62). It seems poetic investigation already contains the potentiality of an (invisible) archive if the writer isalways writingespecially when not. Heres my stupid digital romantic inclination: the living-body (of a poet) is a self-sustaining archive of non-finite memories. But not even I really believe that. AO innovated and sculpted an investigative poetic praxis. In a conversation with poet Rachel Levitsky, poetic-voice is viewed not as a precious identifier, but as a means to think through/about form, concluding that form is linked to framing. While poetic-voice may have tendency to precede form, it also erupts as a result of framing techniques. “They are frames that hold the shape of thinking (which is also to say of imagining) [...].”7 This reminds me of my rabbit who symmetrically chewed the corners of his hutch, which makes me wonder if its an expression of the shape of some animal anxiety tick I wont ever have access to. Beyond the form/frame, death is an unoriginal yet unique limit; death is a damn deathless thing. It functions as a source of poetic investigation; that thing alwaysjust beyond reach.” And how is death not a fetish (in this case an obsessive reverence for something non-material)? “Insofar as it [death] is a presence, a fetish [...] it is in fact something concrete and tangible; but insofar as it is the presence of an absence, it is, at the same time, immaterial and intangible, because it alludes continuously beyond itself to something that can never really be possessed [...] The fetish is [...] a sign of an absence, it is not an unrepeatable unique object; on the contrary, it is something infinitely capable of substitution, without any successive incarnations ever succeeding in exhausting the nullity of which it is the symbol” (Agamben, 33). AO utilized absence (the absent body [catapulted by the death of a beloved]) as an apparatus to investigate. In the process of conversing with absence or that which is absent, the absent body is affectionately objectified, incessantly summonsed back to a place of recognition, of objects, a desire for the absent body to remain intact while exiting the structural limits of grammar and syntax by moving into chant formsto say what cannot be said” (Levitsky). from AN ARRIVING GUARD OF ANGELS THUSLY COMING TO GREET dear oluchi- the light is blinking rapidly on the black boxy machine. your room seems bigger than before and i am still planning to read some of those robert jordan books of yours. yesterday at the used bookstore where i was browsing the mysteries tostall reality” (they are really not mysteries at all, they just employ death as the plot mistress but are unable to grasp its mystery at all)—well the point is, things were calm down here for a while and the world was little. i want to be big like you. or i want you not vast, not dead, not gone, but human small and here. i am so selfish. that is what i really want. to see you again. to oil your scalp. to hear you walk in the door, say ma im home . give me a chance to say welcome home son. or when leaving, dont forget your hat . what do you wear out there? i wish you could have taken your new shoes with you. im so proud of you. im sorry for the way you died. i miss you all the time. even before, i missed you. out there, one time, some different men said: “shake for me girl, i wanna be your backdoor man.” who dat you love. 5/18/03 A letter-poem in sixteen linesdear oluchi-” is safe-housed in epistolary form. Poetic voice is rendered as internal thought meanderings, a not-so-much confession, private/(pillow?) talk in the desire to be heard/witnessed by the referent and reader with an intent to absolve. The diminutiveibears a relation to poet Fanny Howeslittle g Godin thatOne of the (many) things I like about little g God is that you can have a vodka tonic while you talk to little g God, sing along to BowiesIm Afraid Of Americans,” and hum ColtranesA Love Supreme,” though maybe not all at the same time” (Oliver, 2009). Towards the middle of the poem AO is at a used bookstore and remarks on the funny employment of death as aplot mistressthatthey’ (the dubious employed mystery authors) areunable to grasp’, thereby giving death a mouthpiece, a modeling job, something to do to pass the time. from THE VISIBLE UNSEEN When I first saw graffiti, I recognized in it an ugly aesthetic, a dialectics of violence, a distortion of limbs, a hieroglyph. It was only later when I read the names of the dead that I then saw the path of ghosts charted there; its narrative of loss for the visible unseen whose place in history has been fictionalized and rendered unseen under the totalizing glare of history. Inscriptions, traces, specters. Graffiti begs a public face just as ghosts require non-ghosts (humans) to sense them. Thevisible unseenis a game of hide-and-seek between public viewer and graffiti-inscriber, an ephemeral-violent aesthetic on an ephemeral-policed canvas. Graffiti-inscribers already submit to being forgotten, expect to be washed away; perhaps its a holy urban mandala created by gangster-type monks without Buddhism. [...] in its refusal to disappear it forces a discourse in the public imagination we are forced to see what we would rather not, to make sense of an encoded language that we cannot read on the level of meaning. it irritates, forces its agency on us, speaks outside and beyond semiotic reach. An epic font-size pervading the publics imagination, illegible, I could just close my eyes, remain passive, drive past, abandon it beyond reach, push it further away beyond death walls. In Barcelona I watched a clean up crew wash walls with an awesome water hose but I was more intrigued by their bodies; not a distortion of limbs, not hieroglyph but also not entirely legible; the laboring body permanently erasing specters of the city, and of course they knew it was also an invitation for the ghosts to return. Graffiti is deaths little sister, is also an aporia. [...] Graffiti (fr GK -graph(os), something drawn or written, to diagram or chart) attempts to stage the impossible: to erase the essence of its own subjectivity. Graffiti is a cartography of ghosts, a mapping of elegiac rapture (the transporting of a person from one place to another, as in heaven) and rupture (the state of being broken open.) Dwelling is a fiction stasis. [...] The notion of the past as being something done with, a look-back event, inhibits the possibility of reading graffiti as rapture, as rupture. If graffiti posits history as always in the process of becoming undone. [...] Because what is the body, if not also a complex temple, an unstable site through which to negotiate subjects, materiality, economies, gods, and modes of representations? The site where we are all already belated. Graphein meaningto write.” “Derrida says every archive makes a law, and the law of genre is its own rupture” (Bloch, 39). However, graffiti is an (non/anti)-archive of erasure due to (the politics of) washing out its subjectivity, which only adds onto (or is symptomatic of) its character. The inhibition ofreading graffiti as rapture, as ruptureis partly due to it being alook-backevent in that its process involves scratching through layers to reveal previous specters underneath. Graffiti (as an ancient genre) has always been a thing ofbecoming undone’, and thereforebelated and always in arrival’ (Levitsky). Its a Dionysian activity done at night with its back turned toward us. "The specter [...] is of the visible, but of the invisible visible, it is the visibility of a body which is not present in flesh and blood [...] appearing for vision, to the brightness of day [...] something becomes almost visible which is visible only insofar as it is not visible in flesh and blood. It is a night visibility. As soon as there is a technology of the image, visibility brings night. It incarnates in a night body, it radiates in a night light" (Derrida & Stiegler, 115). (shrink)
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  25.  3
    The Usages of Internet and New Media by the Romanian Seventh-Day Adventist Clergy.Mihaela-Alexandra Tudor & Agnos-Millian Herteliu - 2016 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 15 (45):207-233.
    This article highlights how Internet and new media are experienced by Romanian Seventh-Day Adventist pastors in their ministry. What is the acceptance of Web 2.0 services (...) for neo-Protestant pastors of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church, what uses of these technologies they make in their work, what is their mobilization for the appropriation of an innovative culture in the daily pastoral work, how these uses allow them to manage their religious activity, these are the main questions of a survey we conducted in 2016 to shed light on uses of digital technologies by Romanian Seventh-Day Adventist pastors. (shrink)
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  26.  37
    Millennial Dreams and Moral Dilemmas: Seventh-Day Adventism and Contemporary Ethics.Michael Pearson - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    Recent and rapid technological developments on many fronts have created in our society some extremely difficult moral predicaments. Previous generations have not had to face the dilemmas (...)
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  27.  47
    Dorothy Days Pursuit of Public Peace Through Word and Action.Gail Presbey - 2014 - In Greg Moses & Gail Presbey (eds.), Peace Philosophy and Public Life: Commitments, Crises, and Concepts for Engaged Thinking. Amsterdam: Rodopi. pp. 17-40.
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  28.  29
    The Contemporary Frankfurt School's Eurocentrism Unveiled: The Contribution of Amy Allen.Claudia Leeb, Robert Nichols, Yves Winter & Amy Allen - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):772-800.
    I review Amy Allen's Book: The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory (2016) as part of a Review Symposium: -/- In her latest (...)
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  29.  22
    Reactions Toward the Stimulus Source: Analysis of Correct Responses and Errors Over a Five-Day Period.J. Richard Simon, John L. Craft & John B. Webster - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):175.
  30.  42
    Effect of Sleep on Memory: III. Controlling for Time-of-Day Effects.Terry R. Barrett & Bruce R. Ekstrand - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):321.
  31.  41
    Book Review: Amy Allen. The Power of Feminist Theory. Boulder: Westview Press, 1999[REVIEW]Jana Sawicki - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):222-226.
  32.  15
    The Life and Production of the Peasants in Huizhou From the Late Qing Dynasty to the Republic of China: The Analysis Based on 5 Day-to-Day Accounts in Wuyuan County.Huang Zhifan & Shao Hong - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):460-469.
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  33.  13
    Researching Family Through the Everyday Lives of Children Across Home and Day Care in Denmark.Dorte Kousholt - 2011 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (1):98-114.
  34.  11
    Effects of Temperature and Time of Day on Time Judgments.Donald Pfaff - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (3p1):419.
  35.  5
    Day and Night Intervals and the Distribution of Practice.J. B. Spight - 1928 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 11 (5):397.
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  36.  39
    A 14-Day Limit for Bioethics: the Debate Over Human Embryo Research.Giulia Cavaliere - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):38.
    BackgroundThis article explores the reasons in favour of revising and extending the current 14-day statutory limit to maintaining human embryos in culture. This limit is enshrined (...)in law in over a dozen countries, including the United Kingdom. In two recently published studies, scientists have shown that embryos can be sustained in vitro for about 13 days after fertilisation. Positive reactions to these results have gone hand in hand with calls for revising the 14-day rule, which only allows embryo research until the 14th day after fertilisation.Main textThe article explores the most prominent arguments in favour of and against the extension of the 14-day limit for conducting research on human embryos. It situates these arguments within the history of the 14-day limit. I start by discussing the history of the 14-day limit in the United Kingdom and the reasons behind the decision to opt for a compromise between competing moral views. I then analyse the arguments that those who are generally in favour of embryo research put forward in support of extending the 14-day rule, namely the argument of the beneficence of research and the argument of technical feasibility. I then show how these two arguments played a role in the recent approval of two novel techniques for the replacement of faulty mitochondrial DNA in the United Kingdom. Despite the popularity and widespread use of these arguments, I argue that they are ultimately problematic and should not be straightforwardly accepted. I end by making a case for respecting value pluralism in the context of embryo research, and I present two reasons in favour of respecting value pluralism: the argument of public trust and the argument of democracy.ConclusionI argue that 14-day limit for embryo research is not a valuable tool despite being a solution of compromise, but rather because of it. The importance of respecting value pluralism needs to be considered in any evaluation concerning a potential change to the 14-day rule. (shrink)
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  37.  66
    Philosophy the Day After Tomorrow.Stanley Cavell - 2005 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    Something out of the ordinary -- The interminable Shakespearean text -- Fred Astaire asserts the right to praise -- Henry James returns to America and to Shakespeare -- Philosophy the (...) day after tomorrow -- What is the scandal of skepticism? -- Performative and passionate utterance -- The Wittgensteinian event -- Thoreau thinks of ponds, Heidegger of rivers -- The world as things. (shrink)
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  38. Pynchons Against the Day: Bilocation, Duplication, and Differential Repetition.Ali Salami & Razieh Rahmani - 2018 - ACADEMY PUBLICATION 9 (5):953-960.
    In Against the Day, Pynchon is obsessed with twoness, double worlds, as well as dual realities, and like Deleuzes concept of repetition, these duplications and twinships (...)are not merely repetition of the same, rather they allow for creativity, reinvention, and becoming. Pynchons duplication of fictional and spectral characters intends to critique the notion of identity as does Deleuzian concept of repetition. Not attached to the representational concept of identity as the recurrence of the same, Pynchons duplications decenter the transcendental concept in favor of a perpetual becoming and reproduces difference and singularity. Like Deleuze, Pynchon eschews an identity that is always guaranteed, and shows that the repetition of an object or a subject is not the recurrence of the original self-identical object or person. Moreover, Iceland spar, the mystifying calcite, with its doubling effect provides the reader with a view of a world beyond the ordinary, actual world, which is quite similar to what Pynchons novel does per se. (shrink)
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  39. Time of Day Effects on Problem Solving: When the Non-Optimal is Optimal.Mareike B. Wieth & Rose T. Zacks - 2011 - Thinking and Reasoning 17 (4):387 - 401.
    In a study examining the effects of time of day on problem solving, participants solved insight and analytic problems at their optimal or non-optimal time of (...)day. Given the presumed differences in the cognitive processes involved in solving these two types of problems, it was expected that the reduced inhibitory control associated with non-optimal times of the day would differentially impact performance on the two types of problems. In accordance with this expectation, results showed consistently greater insight problem solving performance during non-optimal times of day compared to optimal times of day but no consistent time of day effects on analytic problem solving. The findings indicate that tasks involving creativity might benefit from a non-optimal time of day. (shrink)
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  40.  89
    Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in AmericaBy Amy L. Fairchild, Ronald Bayer, and James Colgrove[REVIEW]Alan Rubel - 2009 - Review of Policy Research 26:633-634.
    Review of Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in AmericaBy Amy L. Fairchild, Ronald Bayer, and James Colgrove.
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  41.  4
    Acceptability and Diffusion of Luxury Anglicisms in Present-Day Romanian.Anabella-Gloria Niculescu-Gorpin & Monica Vasileanu - 2018 - Pragmatics and Cognition 25 (1):86-121.
    In the context of the current heated debate surrounding the pervasive influence of the English language and Anglo-American culture on other languages, as well as the (...)widespread purist attitude towards some contact-induced language change phenomena, both abroad and in Romania, our article discusses the situation of English lexical borrowings in present-day Romanian, focusing on the perception and processing of the so-called luxury Anglicisms by young Romanian native speakers, in an attempt to see whether such an analysis can help clarify their acceptability and diffusion across our target population. We propose an alternative cognitive, psycholinguistic approach to the study of contact-induced lexical borrowings, aiming to show that there is no difference in the young Romanian native speakersprocessing of sentences containing luxury Anglicisms and their established Romanian counterparts. Such findings may support our claim that the acceptability and diffusion of such Anglicisms are pervasive across our target population, even if the official position generally condemns such uses, considering them gratuitous and a burden in communication, even making it unintelligible sometimes. Our analysis starts from the observation that most Romanian academics, whether linguists or not, tend to embrace a purist attitude, while on the other hand young Romanians accept such Anglicisms and tend to use them extensively. In fact, such uses are not limited to young people, who have been the subjects of our research, but are thenormin daily conversations and elsewhere across the general population. Thus, there seems to be a gap between the actual acceptability and diffusion of luxury Anglicisms among Romanians and theofficialrecommendations. Based on the results of a sensicality task, meant to show how 188 Romanians, aged 1822, process and perceive sentences with or without luxury Anglicisms, we will try to show that luxury Anglicisms are accepted and, by recurrent use, diffused among the Romanian community. For a more accurate picture of their diffusion, the findings will be further correlated with data from CoRoLa, the only official corpus of present-day Romanian made available under the auspices of the Romanian Academy, as well as a corpus currently in the making, and the Internet. Besides showing that luxury Anglicisms cannot really be blamed for burdening or impairing processing, and thus communication, and explaining why such uses should not be censured or disapproved, we hope that our study of acceptability and diffusion will demonstrate that we are dealing with a complex, multi-layered phenomenon that can be better understood by going beyond a diachronic and synchronic analysis of particular words and a frequency count, and should incorporate more experimental data. Last but not least, we suggest that, on the practical side, such experimental studies as the one described here could be used as an additional criterion for the lexicographic inclusion of lexical borrowings. (shrink)
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  42.  29
    Arthaud-Day. Transnational Corporate Social Responsibility: A Tri-Dimensional Approach to International C SR Research IJ.Marne L. Arthaud-Day - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (1):1-22.
    Comparatively few studies have analyzed the social behavior of multinational corporations at a cross-national level. To address this gap in the literature, we propose atransnational (...)model of corporate social responsibility that permits identification of universal domains, yet incorporates the flexibility and adaptability demanded by international research. The model is tri-dimensional in that it juxtaposes: 1) Bartlett and Ghoshals typology of MNC strategies ; 2) the three conceptual domains of CSR proposed by the UN Global Compact ; and 3) Zeniseks description of three CSR perspectives . The end result is a multidimensional typology that permits the organization and development of empirical CSR research in an internationalsetting. (shrink)
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  43.  17
    MoralLock-Inin Responsible Innovation: The Ethical and Social Aspects of Killing Day-Old Chicks and Its Alternatives.Payam Moula & Per Sandin - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):939-960.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that will help in understanding and evaluating, along social and ethical lines, the issue of killing (...)
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  44.  8
    Nudging Immunity: The Case for Vaccinating Children in School and Day Care by Default.Alberto Giubilini, Lucius Caviola, Hannah Maslen, Thomas Douglas, Anne-Marie Nussberger, Nadira Faber, Samantha Vanderslott, Sarah Loving, Mark Harrison & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (4):325-344.
    Many parents are hesitant about, or face motivational barriers to, vaccinating their children. In this paper, we propose a type of vaccination policy that could be implemented (...)
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  45.  12
    The Boundaries of Embryo Research: Extending the Fourteen-Day Rule.Caitlin Davis - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (1):133-140.
    The disciplines of ethics, science, and the law often conflict when it comes to determining the limits and boundaries of embryo research. Under current Australian law and (...)
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  46. Remembrance of Philosophy Classes Past: Why Cognitive Science Suggests That a Brief Recap Is the Best Way to Start Each Class Day.Dan Lowe - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):279-289.
    In the past few decades there has been rapid progress in cognitive science with respect to how people learn. Indeed, it can be difficult to keep up (...)
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  47.  17
    Power Day: Addressing the Use and Abuse of Power in Medical Training.Nancy R. Angoff, Laura Duncan, Nichole Roxas & Helena Hansen - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):203-213.
    Problem: Medical student mistreatment, as well as patient and staff mistreatment by all levels of medical trainees and faculty, is still prevalent in U.S. clinical training. (...)Largely missing in interventions to reduce mistreatment is acknowledgement of the abuse of power produced by the hierarchical structure in which medicine is practiced. Approach: Beginning in 2001, Yale School of Medicine has held annualPower Dayworkshops for third year medical students and advanced practice nursing students, to define and analyse power dynamics within the medical hierarchy and hidden curriculum using literature, guest speakers, and small groups. During rotations, medical students write narratives about the use of power witnessed in the wards. In response to student and small group leader feedback, workshop organizers have developed additional activities related to examining and changing the use of power in clinical teams. Outcome: Emerging narrative themes included the potential impact of small acts and students feelingmuteandcomplicitin morally distressing situations. Small groups provided safe spaces for advice, support, and professional identity formation. By 2005, students recognized residents that used power positively with Power Day awards and alumni served as keynote speakers on the use of power in medicine. By 2010, departments including OB/GYN, surgery, psychiatry, and paediatrics, had added weekly team Power Hour discussions. Next Steps: The authors highlight barriers, benefits, and lessons learned. Barriers include the notion of clinical irrelevance and resistance to the wordpowerdue to perceived accusation of abuse. Benefits include promoting open dialogue about power, fostering inter-professional collaboration, rewarding positive role modelling by residents and faculty, and creating a network of trainee empowerment and leadership. Furthermore, faculty have started to ask that issues of power be addressed in a more transparent way at their level of the hierarchy as well. (shrink)
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  48.  2
    Seize the Day or Save the World? The Importance of Ethical Claims and Product Nature Congruity.Vera Herédia-Colaço & Rita Coelho do Vale - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):783-801.
    Consumers have shown increasing interest in products that reflect social and environmental concernsso-calledsustainable products.” Although consumers typically view sustainability positively, the ethical attributes of products (...) do not always drive their preferences, which implies a trade-off between ethical attributes and other valued attributes. In the current research, we examine how consumers implicitly judge products and services that are more or less congruent with social and environmental concerns and how incongruity between ethical claims and a products nature may influence consumers to behave responsibly. The results from two experimental studies show that increasing the strength of ethical claims impairs sophisticated productsevaluation but enhances simple productsevaluation. Additionally, the findings reveal that the strength of ethicality on sophisticated products may impair perceptions of product enjoyment to a point at which products are evaluated more favorably when less-ethical claims are used to promote them. For managers, the results highlight an important business consideration, as they reveal the circumstances under which it is worth emphasizing the strength of the sustainability appeal of products or services. Results show that not all consumers are willing to sacrifice taste or quality in their leisure time preferring to seize the day rather than saving the world. (shrink)
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  49.  5
    Does Gratitude to R for Φ-Ing Imply Gratitude That R Φ-Ed?Tony Manela - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    Many find it plausible that for a given beneficiary, Y, benefactor, R, and action, ϕ, Ys being grateful to R for ϕ-ing implies Ys being (...)
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  50.  12
    Re-Envisioning Critical Theory: Amy Allens The Politics of Our Selves.Nikolas Kompridis - 2014 - Critical Horizons 15 (1):1-13.
    In this paper I question Amy Allens reliance on a Habermasian model of critique and normativity, beyond which her own work points. I emphasize those places (...)in Allens book, The Power of Our Selves, where she could set out on a different path, more consistent with the implications of her critique of Habermas, and more congenial with my own reformulation of the project of critical theory. (shrink)
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