Results for 'Amy Day Ing'

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  1.  18
    The Process of Ethical Decision-Making: Experts Vs Novices.Thomas Van Valey, David Hartmann, Wayne Fuqua, Andrew Evans, Amy Day Ing, Amanda Meyer, Karolina Staros & Chris Walmsley - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):45-60.
    As one approach to examining the way ethical decisions are made, we asked experts and novices to review a set of scenarios that depict some important ethical (...)
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  2.  21
    Regret and Moral Maturity: A Response to Michael Ing and Manyul Im.Amy Olberding - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):579-587.
    This essay elaborates on my essay, “ConfuciusComplaints and the AnalectsAccount of the Good Life,” responding to issues and criticisms raised by Michael Ing and Manyul (...)
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  3.  40
    Bhopal, India and Union Carbide: The Second Tragedy[REVIEW]R. Clayton Trotter, Susan G. Day & Amy E. Love - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):439-454.
    The paper examines the legal, ethical, and public policy issues involved in the Union Carbide gas leak in India which caused the deaths of over 3000 people (...)
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  4.  16
    The Process of Ethical Decision-Making: Experts Vs Novices.Chris Walmsley, Karolina Staros, Amanda Meyer, Amy Ing, Andrew Evans, Wayne Fuqua, David Hartmann & Thomas Valey - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (1):45-60.
    As one approach to examining the way ethical decisions are made, we asked experts and novices to review a set of scenarios that depict some important ethical (...)
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  5.  58
    Moral Exemplars in the Analects: The Good Person is That by Amy Olberding (Review).Michael Ing - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):439-442.
    In Moral Exemplars in the Analects, Amy Olberding offers a self-reflexive and thought-provoking interpretation of the Analects. Scholars of China will find her book valuable in (...) that it provides a holistic reading of the Analects that preserves the tensions in the text. Ethicists will find it valuable in that it furthers discussion on the role of emulating paradigmatic figures in moral development.Olberding characterizes her project as an attempt to "discern a governing logic that renders the Analects' compelling moral sensibility intelligible as moral theory" (p. 1). The difficulty of interpreting the Analects, Olberding explains, is that the text does not offer an explicit moral theory. Instead it reads more like .. (shrink)
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  6.  6
    The Healthcare Worker at Risk During the COVID-19 Pandemic: a Jewish Ethical Perspective.Amy Solnica, Leonid Barski & Alan Jotkowitz - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):441-443.
    The current COVID-19 pandemic has raised many questions and dilemmas for modern day ethicists and healthcare providers. Are physicians, nurses and other healthcare workers morally obligated (...)to put themselves in harms way and treat patients during a pandemic, occurring a great risk to themselves, their families and potentially to other patients? The issue was relevant during the 1918 influenza epidemic and more recently severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in 2003. Since the risk to the healthcare workers was great, there was tension between the ethical duty and responsibility to treat and the risk to ones own life. This tension was further noted during the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa that left hundreds of healthcare workers dead. The AMA Code of Ethics states that physicians are toprovide urgent medical care during disasterseven in the face of greater than usual risk to physiciansown safety, health or life.’1 Classic Jewish sources have dealt with this question as well. There is an obligationto not stand by idly when your friends life is in danger’; however, the question arises as to whether there are limits to this obligation? Is one required to risk ones own life to save anothers? There is a consensus that one is not required but the question open to debate is whether it is praiseworthy to do so. However, regarding healthcare workers, there is agreement for ethical, professional and societal reasons that they are required to put themselves in harms way to care for their patients. (shrink)
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  7.  10
    Food and Everyday Life.Thomas M. Conroy, J. Nikol Beckham, Hui-tun Chuang, Matthew Day, Stephanie Greene, Joanna Henryks, Stacy M. Jameson, Marianne LeGreco, David Livert, Irina D. Mihalache, Roblyn Rawlins, Zachary Schrank, Klara Seddon, Amy Singer, Derek B. Shaw & Bethaney Turner (eds.) - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    This book is a qualitative, interpretive, phenomenological, and interdisciplinary, examination of food and food practices and their meanings in the modern world. Each chapter thematically focuses upon (...)
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  8.  23
    Hopeful and Concerned: Public Input on Building a Trustworthy Medical Information Commons.Patricia A. Deverka, Dierdre Gilmore, Jennifer Richmond, Zachary Smith, Rikki Mangrum, Barbara A. Koenig, Robert Cook-Deegan, Angela G. Villanueva, Mary A. Majumder & Amy L. McGuire - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):70-87.
    A medical information commons is a networked data environment utilized for research and clinical applications. At three deliberations across the U.S., we engaged 75 adults in (...)two-day facilitated discussions on the ethical and social issues inherent to sharing data with an MIC. Deliberants made recommendations regarding opt-in consent, transparent data policies, public representation on MIC governing boards, and strict data security and privacy protection. Community engagement is critical to earning the public's trust. (shrink)
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  9. Beyond the Victim/Empowerment Paradigm: The Gendered Cosmology of Mormon Women.Amy Hoyt - 2007 - Feminist Theology 16 (1):89-100.
    Women's participation in traditional religions is often explained in terms of their victimization and/or their opportunities for empowerment. This paper seeks to use Mormon women as (...) a framework in order to explore some of the consequences of this phenomenon and to advocate for the creation of multiple, complex spaces where traditional religious women may be understood beyond the paradigm of victim/empowerment. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, otherwise known as the LDS or Mormons, maintains a cosmology that is based upon highly differentiated gendered practices. A belief in a female deity, Mother in Heaven, and a related belief that all pious Mormon men and women have the ability to become gods and goddesses in a post-mortal existence are central to the Mormon gendered cosmology. Despite these beliefs, Mormon women generally resist feminism because they perceive feminism to be at odds with motherhood and family. Ironically, their belief in a female divine and their potential divinity strengthens their commitment to interdependence through maternal practices and kinship. (shrink)
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  10.  23
    The Snowman's Imagination.Amy Kind - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):341-348.
    Not all imaginings are successful; sometimes when an imaginer sets out to imagine some target, her imagining involves some kind of mistake. The error can be diagnosed (...)
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  11.  1
    Yes to Lifeand the Expansion of Perinatal Hospice.Amy Kuebelbeck - 2020 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 63 (3):526-531.
    For those of us gathered expectantly in the frescoed 16th-century Clementine Hall in Vatican City on a brilliant spring morning in May 2019, it was a (...)profound moment when Pope Francis spoke the wordsperinatal hospice”. I wish all the medical professionals who have pioneered and developed this care over the last 25 years could have been in that majestic hall with us. Their cumulative workalong with the poignant stories of many familiesis inspiring people around the globe and helping more people than they may ever know. The hour-long private papal audience for conference attendees was the culmination of a three-day conference titledYes to Life! Caring for the Precious Gift of... (shrink)
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  12. The Day After the Apology: A Critical Discourse Analysis of President Tsais National Apology to Taiwans Indigenous Peoples.Chih-Tung Huang & Rong-Xuan Chu - 2021 - Discourse Studies 23 (1):84-101.
    In 2016, Taiwans President Tsai Ing-wen officially apologised to the islands indigenous peoples. This national apology not only plays a persuasive role in informing the (...)
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  13.  4
    A Companion to Ramon Llull and Lullism Ed. by Amy M. Austin and Mark D. Johnston.J. Isaac Goff - 2019 - Franciscan Studies 77 (1):284-286.
    This volume makes an excellent and very important contribution to English-language scholarship on the life, thought, and influence of the Majorcan lay theologian and philosopher, Ramon (...)Llull, the Doctor Illuminatus, from his own day through the Renaissance period into the European exploration of the New World. Llull was a brilliant but idiosyncratic thinker, whose interests and writings touched upon, it seems, every major theological and philosophical theme of his day as well as many topics that only would gain greater interest in later centuries. The editors, Amy M. Austin and Mark D. Johnston, in their preface to the volume note right away the main obstacles contemporary (especially... (shrink)
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  14.  84
    A Naturalist Definition of Art.Denis Dutton - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):367–377.
    Aesthetic theoriesmayclaim universality, but they are normally conditioned by the aesthetic issues and debates of their own times. Plato and Aristo- tle were motivated both to account (...)
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  15.  25
    Information Rights: Trust and Human Dignity in E-Government.Toni Carbo - 2007 - International Review of Information Ethics 7 (9):1-7.
    The wordsRights,‖ ―Trust,‖ ―Human Dignity,‖ and evenGovernmenthave widely varying meanings and connotations, differing across time, languages and cultures. Concepts of rights, trust, and human (...)
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  16.  34
    Arthaud-Day. Transnational Corporate Social Responsibility: A Tri-Dimensional Approach to International C SR Research IJ.Marne L. Arthaud-Day - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (1):1-22.
    Comparatively few studies have analyzed the social behavior of multinational corporations at a cross-national level. To address this gap in the literature, we propose atransnational (...)model of corporate social responsibility that permits identification of universal domains, yet incorporates the flexibility and adaptability demanded by international research. The model is tri-dimensional in that it juxtaposes: 1) Bartlett and Ghoshals typology of MNC strategies ; 2) the three conceptual domains of CSR proposed by the UN Global Compact ; and 3) Zeniseks description of three CSR perspectives . The end result is a multidimensional typology that permits the organization and development of empirical CSR research in an internationalsetting. (shrink)
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  17.  45
    Emancipation, Progress, Critique: Debating Amy Allens The End of Progress.Albena Azmanova, Martin Saar, Guilel Treiber, Azar Dakwar, Noëlle McAfee, Andrew Feenberg & Amy Allen - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (4):511-541.
  18.  43
    The Contemporary Frankfurt School's Eurocentrism Unveiled: The Contribution of Amy Allen.Claudia Leeb, Robert Nichols, Yves Winter & Amy Allen - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):772-800.
    I review Amy Allen's Book: The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory (2016) as part of a Review Symposium: -/- In her latest (...)
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  19. Why Deliberative Democracy?Amy Gutmann & Dennis Thompson - 2004 - Princeton University Press.
    The most widely debated conception of democracy in recent years is deliberative democracy--the idea that citizens or their representatives owe each other mutually acceptable reasons for (...)the laws they enact. Two prominent voices in the ongoing discussion are Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson. In Why Deliberative Democracy?, they move the debate forward beyond their influential book, Democracy and Disagreement.What exactly is deliberative democracy? Why is it more defensible than its rivals? By offering clear answers to these timely questions, Gutmann and Thompson illuminate the theory and practice of justifying public policies in contemporary democracies. They not only develop their theory of deliberative democracy in new directions but also apply it to new practical problems. They discuss bioethics, health care, truth commissions, educational policy, and decisions to declare war. In "What Deliberative Democracy Means," which opens this collection of essays, they provide the most accessible exposition of deliberative democracy to date. They show how deliberative democracy should play an important role even in the debates about military intervention abroad.Why Deliberative Democracy? contributes to our understanding of how democratic citizens and their representatives can make justifiable decisions for their society in the face of the fundamental disagreements that are inevitable in diverse societies. Gutmann and Thompson provide a balanced and fair-minded approach that will benefit anyone intent on giving reason and reciprocity a more prominent place in politics than power and special interests. (shrink)
     
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  20.  21
    Amy Sue Bix. Girls Coming to Tech! A History of American Engineering Education for Women. Xii + 360 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2013. $34[REVIEW]Amy E. Foster - 2015 - Isis 106 (1):207-208.
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  21. Imagining God in Our Ways: The Journals of Frances E. Willard.Diane Capitani - 2003 - Feminist Theology 12 (1):75-88.
    This paper examines the journals of Frances W. Willard, founder and organ izer of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in the United States, and their revelations (...)about the gender battle that raged within the psyche of Willard and other young women of her day. The failure of organized Chris tianity to provide solace or unbiased counsel to women such as Willard is apparent in a close reading of Willard's work. Within the pages of her journals, the struggle she faced is obvious on almost every page; her strug gle with what society said she should do, and what she knew she was capable of doing, is present for all to see. The paper argues that because, however, lived in the United States within a short window of nineteenth- century time, she was able to form a 'Boston Marriage' with a young woman who provided her with the comfort and support she needed. The Boston Marriage, arguably, was available only for relatively well-to-do, white-middle-class women of an educated class, who had attended col lege and, because they were able to find a 'service' career of some kind, could live together in harmony. Enlightened families, like that of Henry James, were able to support female members of their class who did not 'fit in' to societal norms of the day and accept their lifestyle, while negat ing the sexuality of it. Organized religion, however, did not, and it is the failure of her church to help her find a way of life she can tolerate about which Willard writes. You shall not lie with a male as with a woman; it is an abomination. So God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. (shrink)
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  22.  40
    Investigative Poetics: In (Night)-Light of Akilah Oliver.Feliz Molina - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):70-75.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 70-75. cartography of ghosts . . . And as a way to talk . . . of temporality the topography of imagination, this body whose dirty entry (...) into the articulation of history as rapturous becoming & unbecoming, greeted with violence, i take permission to extend this graceAkilah Oliver fromAn Arriving Guard of Angels Thusly Coming To GreetOur disappearance is already here. —Jacques Derrida, 117 I wrestled with death as a threshold, an aporia, a bandit, a part of life. —Akilah Oliver Moraine in geological lingo is that which is left behind. Moraine- a euphemism for the de-stabilizing referent of the writer-ly body as atroubled and troubling landscape marked by cultural and historical signifiers, the body as flesh memory [...] the body as transitory” (Oliver, Author Statement). Morainea geological metaphor of the poet as a holder of memory, as an accumulation of rocks and debris carried along the edge, terminal, dropped at the foot of language (in language). “Flesh Memoryaccording to Akilah Oliver is "that which my body recalls [...] everything has to do with the task of remembrance and its narrative reinvention [...] I was always translating an idea of the world as it presented itself at any given time. To write was a choice about how to be seen, how to enter the world as translator, actor, participant, in the dialogues that apparently made the real 'real'" (Levitsky). Flesh. Memory. The stuff some poems are made from. The stuff that gets abandoned, gleaned, and picked up by more flesh and memory. "My body, my life has always felt like a kaleidoscopic rip in the dominant fabric [...] has always been a dialogue with the impossible and the apparent” (Levitsky). The impossible-body or poet's body anticipates and performs (through language) an irretrievable death. IN APORIA I realized everything I must have been doing must have been Death. It was Christmas or Labor Daya holidayand every time you turned on the radio they said something likefour millionorgoing to die’.” — Andy Warhol Im trying on egos, [a justification for the planets continuance]. Oh hello transgressor, youve come to collect utilitarian debts, humbling narrative space. Give me condition and wheatgrass, I his body disintegrating. I his body is ossification. Death my habit radius, yeah yeah. I his body cant refuse this summons. I cant get out this fucking room. Tell me something different about torture dear Trickster. Tell me about the lightness my mother told me to pick the one i love the best how it signals everything I ever wish to believe true just holy on my ship. I jump all over this house. this is it [what I thought is thought only, nothing more deceptive than]: I his body keeps thinking someone will come along, touch me. As like human or lima bean. Im cradling you to my breast, you are looking out. A little wooden lion you & Peter carve on Bluff Street is quieting across your cheekbone. Not at all like the kind of terror found in sleep, on trembling grounds. It is yesterday now. I have not had a chance to dance in this century. Tonight I shall kill someone, a condition to remember Sunday morning. To think of lives as repetitions [rather than singular serial incarnations]. To understand your death is as exacerbating as trying to figure out why as schoolchildren in mid-nineteen-sixties Southern California we performed reflexive motions: cutting out lace snowflakes, reading Dick and Jane search for their missing mittens, imagining snow. Disintegrat ing . The -ing gerund catapults from the non-finite verb into past, present, future. The -ing as a tail pinned to death, a dog spinning to bite and never fully reaching itself, always shy of the end, circumreferential; a double copulative: deathing. Possessively AO calls ithabit radius” (a virtual fetish attribute) or an inescapable death presence thatconfronts us with the paradox of an unattainable object [...] through its being unattainable” (Agamben, 27). A flirtation or dialogue with an unknowable thing and aporia utilized as investigative instrument to engage (death) while (in Southern California) weperform reflexive motions,” cut lace snowflakes, imagine snow, and pay rent likeyeah, yeahwhat else is new. And this too, fiction. The book I wish to right. The restored fallen, heroic. Did you expect a different grace from the world? Or upon exit? Im working ontough.” They think I am already. All ready. Who is the dead person? Is "I'm sorry" real to a dead person? Browning grass. My hands on this table. A contentious century. A place to pay rent. Redemptive moments. Am I now the dead person? Dead person, dead person, will you partake in my persimmon feast? The body inside the body astounds, confesses sins of the funhouse. I too have admired the people of this planet. Their frilly, orderly intellects. The use theyve made of cardamom, radiation as well. How theyve pasteurized milk, loaned surnames to stars, captured tribes, diseases, streets, and ideas too. The living-body as archive: is it possible to experience the living-body as archive without a (kind of) death? Sifting the rubble, rummaging through hoarded debris, skin sheds, memory-napping, and re-awoken (in flesh and) on terrain. “An investigative poetics seeks to unravel staid communities of thought and grasp at what might always be just beyond reach; a poetics of inquiry that lies between language as meaning, and language as rapturous entry into the world of posited ideas and idealism”( Levitsky). Something snaps. Lights blow out prior to embarking upon an investigative poetics. It begins with a question (often a sexy aporia) that leads to openings. "Every politics of memory [...] implies an intervention of the state. It's a state that legislates and acts with regard to the nonfinite mass of materials to be stored, materials which must be collected, preserved” (Derrida & Stiegler, 62). It seems poetic investigation already contains the potentiality of an (invisible) archive if the writer isalways writingespecially when not. Heres my stupid digital romantic inclination: the living-body (of a poet) is a self-sustaining archive of non-finite memories. But not even I really believe that. AO innovated and sculpted an investigative poetic praxis. In a conversation with poet Rachel Levitsky, poetic-voice is viewed not as a precious identifier, but as a means to think through/about form, concluding that form is linked to framing. While poetic-voice may have tendency to precede form, it also erupts as a result of framing techniques. “They are frames that hold the shape of thinking (which is also to say of imagining) [...].”7 This reminds me of my rabbit who symmetrically chewed the corners of his hutch, which makes me wonder if its an expression of the shape of some animal anxiety tick I wont ever have access to. Beyond the form/frame, death is an unoriginal yet unique limit; death is a damn deathless thing. It functions as a source of poetic investigation; that thing alwaysjust beyond reach.” And how is death not a fetish (in this case an obsessive reverence for something non-material)? “Insofar as it [death] is a presence, a fetish [...] it is in fact something concrete and tangible; but insofar as it is the presence of an absence, it is, at the same time, immaterial and intangible, because it alludes continuously beyond itself to something that can never really be possessed [...] The fetish is [...] a sign of an absence, it is not an unrepeatable unique object; on the contrary, it is something infinitely capable of substitution, without any successive incarnations ever succeeding in exhausting the nullity of which it is the symbol” (Agamben, 33). AO utilized absence (the absent body [catapulted by the death of a beloved]) as an apparatus to investigate. In the process of conversing with absence or that which is absent, the absent body is affectionately objectified, incessantly summonsed back to a place of recognition, of objects, a desire for the absent body to remain intact while exiting the structural limits of grammar and syntax by moving into chant formsto say what cannot be said” (Levitsky). from AN ARRIVING GUARD OF ANGELS THUSLY COMING TO GREET dear oluchi- the light is blinking rapidly on the black boxy machine. your room seems bigger than before and i am still planning to read some of those robert jordan books of yours. yesterday at the used bookstore where i was browsing the mysteries tostall reality” (they are really not mysteries at all, they just employ death as the plot mistress but are unable to grasp its mystery at all)—well the point is, things were calm down here for a while and the world was little. i want to be big like you. or i want you not vast, not dead, not gone, but human small and here. i am so selfish. that is what i really want. to see you again. to oil your scalp. to hear you walk in the door, say ma im home . give me a chance to say welcome home son. or when leaving, dont forget your hat . what do you wear out there? i wish you could have taken your new shoes with you. im so proud of you. im sorry for the way you died. i miss you all the time. even before, i missed you. out there, one time, some different men said: “shake for me girl, i wanna be your backdoor man.” who dat you love. 5/18/03 A letter-poem in sixteen linesdear oluchi-” is safe-housed in epistolary form. Poetic voice is rendered as internal thought meanderings, a not-so-much confession, private/(pillow?) talk in the desire to be heard/witnessed by the referent and reader with an intent to absolve. The diminutiveibears a relation to poet Fanny Howeslittle g Godin thatOne of the (many) things I like about little g God is that you can have a vodka tonic while you talk to little g God, sing along to BowiesIm Afraid Of Americans,” and hum ColtranesA Love Supreme,” though maybe not all at the same time” (Oliver, 2009). Towards the middle of the poem AO is at a used bookstore and remarks on the funny employment of death as aplot mistressthatthey’ (the dubious employed mystery authors) areunable to grasp’, thereby giving death a mouthpiece, a modeling job, something to do to pass the time. from THE VISIBLE UNSEEN When I first saw graffiti, I recognized in it an ugly aesthetic, a dialectics of violence, a distortion of limbs, a hieroglyph. It was only later when I read the names of the dead that I then saw the path of ghosts charted there; its narrative of loss for the visible unseen whose place in history has been fictionalized and rendered unseen under the totalizing glare of history. Inscriptions, traces, specters. Graffiti begs a public face just as ghosts require non-ghosts (humans) to sense them. Thevisible unseenis a game of hide-and-seek between public viewer and graffiti-inscriber, an ephemeral-violent aesthetic on an ephemeral-policed canvas. Graffiti-inscribers already submit to being forgotten, expect to be washed away; perhaps its a holy urban mandala created by gangster-type monks without Buddhism. [...] in its refusal to disappear it forces a discourse in the public imagination we are forced to see what we would rather not, to make sense of an encoded language that we cannot read on the level of meaning. it irritates, forces its agency on us, speaks outside and beyond semiotic reach. An epic font-size pervading the publics imagination, illegible, I could just close my eyes, remain passive, drive past, abandon it beyond reach, push it further away beyond death walls. In Barcelona I watched a clean up crew wash walls with an awesome water hose but I was more intrigued by their bodies; not a distortion of limbs, not hieroglyph but also not entirely legible; the laboring body permanently erasing specters of the city, and of course they knew it was also an invitation for the ghosts to return. Graffiti is deaths little sister, is also an aporia. [...] Graffiti (fr GK -graph(os), something drawn or written, to diagram or chart) attempts to stage the impossible: to erase the essence of its own subjectivity. Graffiti is a cartography of ghosts, a mapping of elegiac rapture (the transporting of a person from one place to another, as in heaven) and rupture (the state of being broken open.) Dwelling is a fiction stasis. [...] The notion of the past as being something done with, a look-back event, inhibits the possibility of reading graffiti as rapture, as rupture. If graffiti posits history as always in the process of becoming undone. [...] Because what is the body, if not also a complex temple, an unstable site through which to negotiate subjects, materiality, economies, gods, and modes of representations? The site where we are all already belated. Graphein meaningto write.” “Derrida says every archive makes a law, and the law of genre is its own rupture” (Bloch, 39). However, graffiti is an (non/anti)-archive of erasure due to (the politics of) washing out its subjectivity, which only adds onto (or is symptomatic of) its character. The inhibition ofreading graffiti as rapture, as ruptureis partly due to it being alook-backevent in that its process involves scratching through layers to reveal previous specters underneath. Graffiti (as an ancient genre) has always been a thing ofbecoming undone’, and thereforebelated and always in arrival’ (Levitsky). Its a Dionysian activity done at night with its back turned toward us. "The specter [...] is of the visible, but of the invisible visible, it is the visibility of a body which is not present in flesh and blood [...] appearing for vision, to the brightness of day [...] something becomes almost visible which is visible only insofar as it is not visible in flesh and blood. It is a night visibility. As soon as there is a technology of the image, visibility brings night. It incarnates in a night body, it radiates in a night light" (Derrida & Stiegler, 115). (shrink)
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  23.  53
    Compromise: J. P. Day.J. P. Day - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (250):471-485.
    Human conflict and its resolution is obviously a subject of great practical importance. Equally obviously, it is a vast subject, ranging from total war at one end (...)
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  24.  7
    Huang T'Ing-Chien's "Incense of Awareness": Poems of Exchange, Poems of Enlightenment.Stuart Sargent & Huang T'ing-Chien - 2001 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (1):60-71.
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  25.  35
    Evaluation of Medication Errors Via a Computerized Physician Order Entry System in an Inpatient Renal Transplant Unit.K. Marfo, D. Garcia, S. Khalique, K. Berger & A. Lu - 2011 - Transplant Research and Risk Management 2011.
    Kwaku Marfo, Danielle Garcia, Saira Khalique, Karen Berger, Amy LuMontefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USABackground: Medication errors are a prime concern for all in healthcare. As such (...)
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  26.  78
    Democracy and Disagreement.Amy Gutmann - 1996 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    The authors offer ways to encourage and educate Americans to participate in the public deliberations that make democracy work and lay out the principles of..
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  27. The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    While post- and decolonial theorists have thoroughly debunked the idea of historical progress as a Eurocentric, imperialist, and neocolonialist fallacy, many of the most prominent contemporary thinkers (...)
     
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  28.  30
    Liberating Critical Theory: Eurocentrism, Normativity, and Capitalism: Symposium on Amy Allens The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory, Columbia University Press, 2016.Claudia Leeb, Robert Nichols, Yves Winter & Amy Allen - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):772-800.
  29.  15
    Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading.Amy Coplan - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):94-97.
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  30.  24
    Chiang Ch'Ing's "Farewell Letter" to T'Ang Na.Lan P'ing Chiang Ch'ing - 1980 - Chinese Studies in History 14 (2):77-82.
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    A New Assessment of the Rural Social Relationship in Late Ming and Early Ch'Ing China.Ful I.-ing - 1981 - Chinese Studies in History 15 (1-2):62-92.
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    Towards a History From Antiquity to the Renaissance of Sundials and Other Instruments for Reckoning Time by the Sun and Stars H ESTER H IGTON, SundialsAn Illustrated History of Portable Dials. London: Philip Wilson, 2001. Reviewed by D AVID A. K ING, Institute for the History of Science, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, D60054 Frankfurt Am Main, Germany H ESTER H IGTON, with Contributions From S ILKE A CKERMANN, R ICHARD D UNN, K IYOSHI T AKADA and A NTHONY T URNER, Sundials at GreenwichA Catalogue of the Sundials, Horary Quadrants and Nocturnals in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Oxford: Oxford University Press, and Greenwich: National Maritime Museum, 2002[REVIEW]D. Avid Ak Ing - 2004 - Annals of Science 61 (3):375-388.
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    Confession of an Old-Time Capitulationist - Critique of Chiang Ch'Ing's Sinister Article "Our Life".Wen P'ing & Feng Cheng - 1979 - Chinese Studies in History 12 (3):56-61.
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  34. Democracy and Disagreement.Amy Gutmann & Dennis Thompson - 1996 - Ethics 108 (3):607-610.
  35. The Dysfunction of Ritual in Early Confucianism.Michael David Kaulana Ing - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Michael Ing's The Dysfunction of Ritual in Early Confucianism is the first monograph in English about the Liji--a text that purports to be the writings of (...) Confucius' immediate disciples, and part of the earliest canon of Confucian texts called ''The Five Classics,'' included in the canon several centuries before the Analects. Ing uses his analysis of the Liji to show how early Confucians coped with situations where their rituals failed to achieve their intended aims. In contrast to most contemporary interpreters of Confucianism, Ing demonstrates that early Confucian texts can be read as arguments for ambiguity in ritual failure. (shrink)
     
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  36. The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity.Amy Allen - 1999 - Westview Press.
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, (...)
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  37. The Heterogeneity of the Imagination.Amy Kind - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (1):141-159.
    Imagination has been assigned an important explanatory role in a multitude of philosophical contexts. This paper examines four such contexts: mindreading, pretense, our engagement with fiction, and (...)
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    Democratic Education.Amy Gutmann - 1999 - Princeton University Press.
    Who should have the authority to shape the education of citizens in a democracy? This is the central question posed by Amy Gutmann in the first book- (...)length study of the democratic theory of education. The author tackles a wide range of issues, from the democratic case against book banning to the role of teachers' unions in education, as well as the vexed questions of public support for private schools and affirmative action in college admissions. (shrink)
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  39. Book Review: Wannabes, Goths, and Christians: The Boundaries of Sex, Style, and Status. By Amy C. Wilkins. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2008, 256 Pp., $55.00 (Cloth); $22.00[REVIEW]Amy L. Best - 2008 - Gender and Society 22 (2):261-262.
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  40. Whats so Transparent About Transparency.Amy Kind - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 115 (3):225-244.
    Intuitions about the transparency of experience have recently begun to play a key role in the debate about qualia. Specifically, such intuitions have been used by representationalists (...)
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  41. The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens.Amy Allen - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):200-204.
  42. Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives.Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Empathy has for a long time, at least since the eighteenth century, been seen as centrally important in relation to our capacity to gain a grasp of (...)
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  43. Persons and Personal Identity.Amy Kind - 2015 - Polity.
    As persons, we are importantly different from all other creatures in the universe. But in what, exactly, does this difference consist? What kinds of entities are we, (...)
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  44.  29
    Identity in Democracy.Amy Gutmann - 2004 - Princeton University Press.
    I doubt that even one of her readers will agree with all of Gutmann's conclusions--but they will all have to take account of the wealth (...)
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  45. A Tutorial Introduction to Bayesian Models of Cognitive Development.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Thomas L. Griffiths & Fei Xu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):302-321.
  46. The Puzzle of Imaginative Desire.Amy Kind - 2011 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):421-439.
    The puzzle of imaginative desire arises from the difficulty of accounting for the surprising behaviour of desire in imaginative activities such as our engagement with fiction and (...)
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  47. The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2007 - Columbia University Press.
    Introduction : the politics of our selves -- Foucault, subjectivity, and the enlightenment : a critical reappraisal -- The impurity of practical reason : power and autonomy in Foucault -- Dependency, (...)
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  48. Feminism and the Subject of Politics Amy Allen.Amy Allen - 2009 - In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 1.
  49. The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination.Amy Kind (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    Imagination occupies a central place in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. However, following a period of relative neglect there has been an explosion of interest in imagination (...)
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  50. Knowledge Through Imagination.Amy Kind & Peter Kung (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Imagination is celebrated as our vehicle for escape from the mundane here and now. It transports us to distant lands of magic and make-believe, and provides (...)us with diversions during boring meetings or long bus rides. Yet the focus on imagination as a means of escape from the real world minimizes the fact that imagination seems also to furnish us with knowledge about it. Imagination seems an essential component in our endeavor to learn about the world in which we live--whether we're planning for the future, aiming to understand other people, or figuring out whether two puzzle pieces fit together. But how can the same mental power that allows us to escape the world as it currently is also inform us about the world as it currently is? Ten original essays grapple with this neglected question; in doing so, they present a diverse array of positions ranging from cautious optimism to deep-seated pessimism. Blending perspectives from philosophy of mind, cognitive science, epistemology, aesthetics, and ethics, Knowledge Through Imagination sheds new light on the epistemic role of imagination. (shrink)
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