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Amy McKiernan
Dickinson College
  1. Standing Conditions and Blame.Amy L. McKiernan - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (1):145-151.
    In “The Standing to Blame: A Critique” (2013), Macalester Bell challenges theories that claim that ‘standing’ plays a central role in blaming practices. These standard accounts posit that it is not enough for the target of blame to be blameworthy; the blamer also must have the proper standing to blame the wrongdoer. Bell identifies and criticizes four different standing conditions, (1) the Business Condition, (2) the Contemporary Condition, (3) the Nonhypocricy Condition, and (4) the Noncomplicity Condition. According to standard accounts, (...)
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    Blame: Its Nature and Norms, Edited by D. Justin Coates and Neal A. Tognazzini.Amy L. McKiernan - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (4):467-470.
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    Do Metaphors Matter? Fibromyalgia and Women's Embodiment.Amy L. McKiernan - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):112-134.
    During the winter of 2016, I attended a four-part class aimed at promoting wellness for those who suffer from chronic pain. At our second meeting, I asked the psychologist facilitating the class, "Do you know of any metaphors beyond severe weakness or violence that I might use to describe my pain?" He looked surprised and lifted his hand to his heart. "I'm so sorry that you feel like you need to describe your experiences this way," he replied, then stared at (...)
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    Nietzsche’s Prefaces as Practices of Self-Care.Amy L. McKiernan - 2016 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):447-463.
    Although Nietzsche scholars have paid close attention to his aphoristic and rhetorical style, few have focused on his practice of writing prefaces. In this paper, I engage in a close reading of Nietzsche’s prefaces and identify five themes present in his earlier and later prefaces: (1) he speaks directly to his readers, (2) he stresses the necessity of slow and careful reading, (3) he encourages readers to trust themselves, (4) he refers to himself as a herald, and (5) he uses (...)
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