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Amy Schmitter
University of Alberta
  1.  63
    17th and 18th Century Theories of Emotions.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    1. Introduction: 1.1 Difficulties of Approach; 1.2 Philosophical Background. 2. The Context of Early Modern Theories of the Passions: 2.1 Changing Vocabulary; 2.2 Taxonomies; 2.3 Philosophical Issues in Theories of the Emotions. SUPPLEMENTARY DOCUMENTS: Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Theories of the Emotions; Descartes; Hobbes; Malebranche; Spinoza; Shaftsbury; Hutcheson; Hume.
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  2.  24
    The Passionate Intellect: Reading the (Non-) Opposition of Intellect and Emotion in Descartes.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 2005 - In Joyce Jenkins, Jennifer Whiting & Christopher Williams (eds.), Persons and Passions: Essays in Honor of Annette Baier. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 48-82.
  3. Descartes's Representation of the Self.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1993 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    While Descartes's status as a "representationalist" is often a subject of vehement debate, what exactly he means by "representation" is not. I look to Descartes's early work to show that he first conceives of representation through signification, in which the sign and the signified are isomorphic; on this view, relations of representation can be arbitrary and are to be distinguished from relations of resemblance. I then examine images to show the possibility of an image constructing a relation to its viewer, (...)
     
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  4.  32
    Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 51 (3):672-674.
  5.  23
    Descartes on Seeing.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (4):951-953.
  6.  8
    Descartes's Imagination: Proportion, Images, and the Activity of Thinking. [REVIEW]Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):424-425.
    1996 marks the 400th anniversary of Descartes' birth, and it seems only appropriate that it should bring a reevaluation of Descartes' thought and his place in the history of philosophy. Dennis Sepper's new book on the role of the imagination offers such a rethinking, proposing that--contrary to popular rumor--Descartes' entire corpus was centrally concerned with the proper uses of imagination, a concern initially informed by medieval doctrines of the internal senses and imagination. Sepper argues that Descartes' earliest work, especially the (...)
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  7.  23
    Krausz, Michael. Rightness and Reasons: Interpretation in Cultural Practices.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):165-167.
  8.  19
    Sepper, Dennis L. Descartes's Imagination: Proportion, Images, and the Activity of Thinking.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):424-425.
  9.  8
    Descartes on Seeing: Epistemology and Visual Perception. [REVIEW]Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (4):951-953.
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  10.  25
    Representation, Self-Representation, and the Passions in Descartes.Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (2):331 - 357.
    THAT DESCARTES WAS INTERESTED from the very start of his philosophic career in developing a method for problem-solving that could be applied generally to the solution of "unknowns" is well known. Also well known is the further development of the method by the introduction of the technique of hyperbolic doubt in his mature, metaphysical works, especially in the Meditations. Perhaps less widely appreciated is the important role that accounts of systems of signs played in the development of his early accounts (...)
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  11.  1
    Rightness and Reasons: Interpretation in Cultural Practices. [REVIEW]Amy Morgan Schmitter - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):165-166.
    In David Lodge's novel Changing Places, the protagonist Morris Zapp recalls his plan for a series of commentaries examining Jane Austen's novels under every possible rubric, from the historical to the structuralist, the mythical to the Marxist--all in order so to monopolize interpretation as to exhaust it altogether. I take it that Michael Krausz would find Zapp's ambition both unpalatable and impracticable, although he does not actually rule it out of court. Krausz's topic is interpretive ideals, and his target is (...)
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