Results for 'Amy Subar'

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  1.  60
    The impact of reporting magnetic resonance imaging incidental findings in the Canadian alliance for healthy hearts and minds cohort.Rhian Touyz, Amy Subar, Ian Janssen, Bob Reid, Eldon Smith, Caroline Wong, Pierre Boyle, Jean Rouleau, F. Henriques, F. Marcotte, K. Bibeau, E. Larose, V. Thayalasuthan, A. Moody, F. Gao, S. Batool, C. Scott, S. E. Black, C. McCreary, E. Smith, M. Friedrich, K. Chan, J. Tu, H. Poiffaut, J. -C. Tardif, J. Hicks, D. Thompson, L. Parker, R. Miller, J. Lebel, H. Shah, D. Kelton, F. Ahmad, A. Dick, L. Reid, G. Paraga, S. Zafar, N. Konyer, R. de Souza, S. Anand, M. Noseworthy, G. Leung, A. Kripalani, R. Sekhon, A. Charlton, R. Frayne, V. de Jong, S. Lear, J. Leipsic, A. -S. Bourlaud, P. Poirier, E. Ramezani, K. Teo, D. Busseuil, S. Rangarajan, H. Whelan, J. Chu, N. Noisel, K. McDonald, N. Tusevljak, H. Truchon, D. Desai, Q. Ibrahim, K. Ramakrishnana, C. Ramasundarahettige, S. Bangdiwala, A. Casanova, L. Dyal, K. Schulze, M. Thomas, S. Nandakumar, B. -M. Knoppers, P. Broet, J. Vena, T. Dummer, P. Awadalla, Matthias G. Friedrich, Douglas S. Lee, Jean-Claude Tardif, Erika Kleiderman & Marcotte - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundIn the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds (CAHHM) cohort, participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, heart, and abdomen, that generated incidental findings (IFs). The approach to managing these unexpected results remain a complex issue. Our objectives were to describe the CAHHM policy for the management of IFs, to understand the impact of disclosing IFs to healthy research participants, and to reflect on the ethical obligations of researchers in future MRI studies.MethodsBetween 2013 and 2019, 8252 participants (...)
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  2. The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination.Amy Kind (ed.) - 2016 - New York: Routledge.
    Imagination occupies a central place in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. However, following a period of relative neglect there has been an explosion of interest in imagination in the past two decades as philosophers examine the role of imagination in debates about the mind and cognition, aesthetics and ethics, as well as epistemology, science and mathematics. This outstanding _Handbook_ contains over thirty specially commissioned chapters by leading philosophers organised into six clear sections examining the most important aspects of the philosophy (...)
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  3. Ordinary Objects.Amie L. Thomasson (ed.) - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Arguments that ordinary inanimate objects such as tables and chairs, sticks and stones, simply do not exist have become increasingly common and increasingly prominent. Some are based on demands for parsimony or for a non-arbitrary answer to the special composition question; others arise from prohibitions against causal redundancy, ontological vagueness, or co-location; and others still come from worries that a common sense ontology would be a rival to a scientific one. Until now, little has been done to address these arguments (...)
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  4. How Imagination Gives Rise to Knowledge.Amy Kind - 2018 - In Fiona Macpherson & Fabian Dorsch (eds.), Perceptual Imagination and Perceptual Memory. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 227-246.
    Though philosophers such as Wittgenstein and Sartre have dismissed imagination as epistemically irrelevant, this chapter argues that there are numerous cases in which imagining can help to justify our contingent beliefs about the world. The argument proceeds by the consideration of case studies involving two particularly gifted imaginers, Nikola Tesla and Temple Grandin. Importantly, the lessons that we learn from these case studies are applicable to cases involving less gifted imaginers as well. Though not all imaginings will have justificatory power, (...)
     
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  5. Imaginative Experience.Amy Kind - 2020 - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Consciousness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this essay, the focus is not on what imagination is but rather on what it is like. Rather than exploring the various accounts of imagination on offer in the philosophical literature, we will instead be exploring the various accounts of imaginative experience on offer in that literature. In particular, our focus in what follows will be on three different sorts of accounts that have played an especially prominent role in philosophical thinking about these issues: the impoverishment view (often associated (...)
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  6. Social entities.Amie L. Thomasson - 2009 - In Robin Le Poidevin, Simons Peter, McGonigal Andrew & Ross P. Cameron (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. New York: Routledge.
  7. Speaking of fictional characters.Amie L. Thomasson - 2003 - Dialectica 57 (2):205–223.
    The challenge of handling fictional discourse is to find the best way to resolve the apparent inconsistencies in our ways of speaking about fiction. A promising approach is to take at least some such discourse to involve pretense, but does all fictional discourse involve pretense? I will argue that a better, less revisionary, solution is to take internal and fictionalizing discourse to involve pretense, while allowing that in external critical discourse, fictional names are used seriously to refer to fictional characters. (...)
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  8. Answerable and unanswerable questions.Amie L. Thomasson - 2009 - In David Chalmers, David Manley & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press.
    While fights about ontology rage on in the ring, there’s long been a suspicion whispered in certain corners of the stadium that some of the fights aren’t real. Granted the disputants all think they are really disagreeing—it’s not the sincerity of the serious ontologists that’s in question, but rather their judgment that they are engaged in a real debate about genuine issues of substance.
     
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  9. What is Consciousness?Amy Kind & Daniel Stoljar - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    What is consciousness and why is it so philosophically and scientifically puzzling? For many years philosophers approached this question assuming a standard physicalist framework on which consciousness can be explained by contemporary physics, biology, neuroscience, and cognitive science. This book is a debate between two philosophers who are united in their rejection of this kind of "standard" physicalism - but who differ sharply in what lesson to draw from this. Amy Kind defends dualism 2.0, a thoroughly modern version of dualism (...)
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  10.  40
    Critique on the couch: why critical theory needs psychoanalysis.Amy Allen - 2020 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    Does critical theory still need psychoanalysis? In Critique on the Couch, Amy Allen offers a cogent and convincing defense of its ongoing relevance. Countering the overly rationalist and progressivist interpretations of psychoanalysis put forward by contemporary critical theorists such as Jürgen Habermas and Axel Honneth, Allen argues that the work of Melanie Klein offers an underutilized resource. She draws on Freud, Klein, and Lacan to develop a more realistic strand of psychoanalytic thinking that centers on notions of loss, negativity, ambivalence, (...)
  11.  68
    The impoverishment problem.Amy Kind - 2024 - Synthese 203 (4):1-15.
    Work in philosophy of mind often engages in descriptive phenomenology, i.e., in attempts to characterize the phenomenal character of our experience. Nagel’s famous discussion of what it’s like to be a bat demonstrates the difficulty of this enterprise (1974). But while Nagel located the difficulty in our absence of an objective vocabulary for describing experience, I argue that the problem runs deeper than that: we also lack an adequate subjective vocabulary for describing phenomenology. We struggle to describe our own phenomenal (...)
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  12.  91
    Karl Marx on technology and alienation.Amy E. Wendling - 2009 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Introduction -- Karl Marx's concept of alienation -- Objectification, alienation, and estrangement -- Other origins of alienation and objectification -- Marx's account of alienation : from early to late -- The alienated object of production : commodity fetishism -- The alienated means of production : machine fetishism -- Machines and the transformation of work -- Marx's energeticist turn -- The first law of thermodynamics -- From arbeit to arbeitskraft -- The second law of thermodynamics -- Machines in the communist future (...)
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  13.  74
    Passions and affections.Amy Schmitter - 2013 - In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford handbook of British philosophy in the seventeenth century. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pp. 442-471.
    This chapter examines the views of seventeenth-century British philosophers on passions and affections. It explains that about 8,000 books published during this period mentioned passion and that it started with Thomas Wright's Passions of the Mind in General. The chapter also explores the intellectual basis of the writers who wrote about passion – which includes Augustinianism, Aristotelianism, stoicism, Epicureanism, and medicine – and furthermore, analyzes the relevant works of Francis Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, Henry More, and Lord Shaftesbury.
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  14. A Brief History of Trans Philosophy.Amy Marvin - 2019 - Contingent Magazine.
    Provides a brief account of trans philosophy organizing in the 2010s and argues for the importance of building spaces for trans philosophers.
     
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  15.  90
    Hope in a Vice: Carole Pateman, Judith Butler, and Suspicious Hope.Amy Billingsley - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (3):597-612.
    Eve Sedgwick critiques paranoid methodologies for denying a plurality of affective approaches. Instead, she emphasizes affects such as hope, but her description of hope's openness does not address how hope can avoid discourses that appear to offer amelioration while deceptively masking subjugation. In this context, I will argue that suspicion in feminist political philosophy, as shown in the earlier work of Carole Pateman and Judith Butler, provides a cautious approach toward hope's openness without precluding hope altogether. This analysis will reconsider (...)
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  16.  13
    Dirāsāt falsafīyah muhdāh ilá rūḥ ʻUthmān Amīn.ʻUthmān Amīn & Ibrāhīm Madkūr (eds.) - 1979 - al-Qāhirah: Dār al-Thaqāfah lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr.
  17. Knowledge Through Imagination.Amy Kind & Peter Kung (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press UK.
    Imagination is celebrated as our vehicle for escape from the mundane here and now. It transports us to distant lands of magic and make-believe, and provides us with diversions during boring meetings or long bus rides. Yet the focus on imagination as a means of escape from the real world minimizes the fact that imagination seems also to furnish us with knowledge about it. Imagination seems an essential component in our endeavor to learn about the world in which we live--whether (...)
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  18.  50
    The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2016 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    While post- and decolonial theorists have thoroughly debunked the idea of historical progress as a Eurocentric, imperialist, and neocolonialist fallacy, many of the most prominent contemporary thinkers associated with the Frankfurt School--Jürgen Habermas, Axel Honneth, and Rainer Forst--have persistently defended ideas of progress, development, and modernity and have even made such ideas central to their normative claims. Can the Frankfurt School's goal of radical social change survive this critique? And what would a decolonized critical theory look like? Amy Allen fractures (...)
  19.  40
    Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading.Amy Coplan - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):94-97.
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  20.  81
    Ordinary Objects * By AMIE L.THOMASSON.Amie Thomasson - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):173-174.
    In recent analytic metaphysics, the view that ‘ordinary inanimate objects such as sticks and stones, tables and chairs, simply do not exist’ has been defended by some noteworthy writers. Thomasson opposes such revisionary ontology in favour of an ontology that is conservative with respect to common sense. The book is written in a straightforward, methodical and down-to-earth style. It is also relatively non-specialized, enabling the author and her readers to approach problems that are often dealt with in isolation in a (...)
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  21.  17
    Transitional Subjects: Critical Theory and Object Relations.Amy Allen & Brian O'Connor (eds.) - 2019 - Columbia University Press.
    Critical social theory has long been marked by a deep, creative, and productive relationship with psychoanalysis. Whereas Freud and Fromm were important cornerstones for the early Frankfurt School, recent thinkers have drawn on the object-relations school of psychoanalysis. Transitional Subjects is the first book-length collection devoted to the engagement of critical theory with the work of Melanie Klein, Donald Winnicott, and other members of this school. Featuring contributions from some of the leading figures working in both of these fields, including (...)
  22.  26
    Law, ethics and the biopolitical.Amy Swiffen - 2011 - New York, N.Y.: Routledge.
    Law, Ethics and the Biopolitical explores the idea that legal authority is no longer related to national sovereignty, but to the 'moral' attempt to nurture life. The book argues that whilst the relationship between law and ethics has long been a central concern in legal studies, it is now the relationship between law and life that is becoming crucial. The waning legitimacy of conventional conceptions of sovereignty is signalled the renewal of a version of natural law, evident in discourses of (...)
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  23.  39
    Chalmers' Zombie Argument.Amy Kind - 2011-09-16 - In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 327–329.
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  24.  81
    Ethical Challenges Arising in the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Overview from the Association of Bioethics Program Directors (ABPD) Task Force.Amy L. McGuire, Mark P. Aulisio, F. Daniel Davis, Cheryl Erwin, Thomas D. Harter, Reshma Jagsi, Robert Klitzman, Robert Macauley, Eric Racine, Susan M. Wolf, Matthew Wynia & Paul Root Wolpe - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):15-27.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has raised a host of ethical challenges, but key among these has been the possibility that health care systems might need to ration scarce critical care resources. Rationing p...
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  25. Artifacts and human concepts.Amie Thomasson - manuscript
    Creations of the Mind: Essays on Artifacts and their Representation, ed. Stephen Laurence and Eric Margolis, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
     
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  26.  23
    Nagel's “What is it like to be a Bat” Argument against Physicalism.Amy Kind - 2011-09-16 - In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 324–326.
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  27.  1
    Critique as Melancholy Science.Amy Allen - 2020 - In María Del Del Rosario Acosta López & Colin McQuillan (eds.), Critique in German Philosophy: From Kant to Critical Theory. SUNY Press. pp. 335-356.
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  28. Why We Need Imagination.Amy Kind - 2023 - In Brian McLaughlin & Jonathan Cohen (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Mind, 2nd edition. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 570-587.
    Traditionally, imagination has been considered to be a primitive mental state type (or group of types), irreducible to other mental state types. In particular, it has been thought to be distinct from other mental states such as belief, perception, and memory, among others. Recently, however, the category of imagination has come under attack, with challenges emerging from a multitude of different directions. Some philosophers have argued that we should not recognize belief and imagination as distinct states but rather on a (...)
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  29.  3
    Everybody wants to go to heaven but nobody wants to die: bioethics and the transformation of health care in America.Amy Gutmann - 2019 - New York: Liveright Publishing Corporation.
    An incisive examination of bioethics and American healthcare, and their profound affects on American culture over the last sixty years, from two eminent scholars. An eye-opening look at the inevitable moral choices that come along with tremendous medical progress, Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven but Nobody Wants to Die is a primer for all Americans to talk more honestly about health care. Beginning in the 1950s when doctors still paid house calls but regularly withheld the truth from their patients, (...)
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  30.  12
    Creative Mothering.Amy Kind - 2010-09-24 - In Fritz Allhoff & Sheila Lintott (eds.), Motherhood ‐ Philosophy for Everyone. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 29–40.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Bedtime Stories It's For Your Own Good; Or Is It? Truth, Lies, and Parental Whoppers Lies, Rights, and Rationality Conclusion: It Isn't Easy Being Honest Notes.
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  31.  12
    “I'm Sharon, but I'm a Different Sharon”: The Identity of Cylons.Amy Kind - 2007-11-16 - In Jason T. Eberl (ed.), Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 64–74.
    This chapter contains section titled: “We Must Survive, and We Will Survive”—But How? “Death Becomes a Learning Experience” “I Am Sharon and That's Part of What You Need to Understand” “It's Not Enough Just to Survive”—Or Is It? Notes.
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  32. Akhlāq-i Amīnī.Ḥasan Amīn al-Sharīʻah - 1989 - Glasgow: Distributors outside Iran, Royston. Edited by S. H. Amin.
     
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  33. A tutorial introduction to Bayesian models of cognitive development.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Thomas L. Griffiths & Fei Xu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):302-321.
  34. Qiṣṣat al-falsafah al-ḥadīthah.Aḥmad Amīn - 1983 - al-Qāhirah: Maktabat al-Nahḍah al-Miṣrīyah. Edited by Zakī Najīb Maḥmūd.
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  35. Ilāhīyāt-i dīyāliktīkī: masāʼilī chand az jahānshināsī-i falsafī-i Īrān va shīʻī.Ḥamīd Ḥamīd - 1979 - Pakhsh az Intishārāt-i Sharq,: Intishārāt-i Nigāh ;.
     
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  36.  44
    Gratitude and Caring Labor.Amy Mullin - 2011 - Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (2):110-122.
    I argue that it is appropriate for adult recipients of personal care to feel and express gratitude whenever care providers are inspired partly by benevolence, and deliver a real benefit in a manner that conveys respect for the recipient. My focus on gratitude is consistent with important aspects of feminist ethics of care, including its attention to the particularities and vulnerabilities of caregivers and care recipients, and its concern with how relations of care are shaped by social hierarchies and public (...)
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  37. Easy Ontology and its Consequences.Amie Thomasson - 2016 - In Gary Ostertag (ed.), Meanings and Other Things: Themes From the Work of Stephen Schiffer. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
     
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  38.  45
    The learnability of abstract syntactic principles.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Terry Regier - 2011 - Cognition 118 (3):306-338.
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  39. Introduction.Amy Allen & Eduardo Mendieta - 2021 - In Amy Allen & Eduardo Mendieta (eds.), Decolonizing ethics: the critical theory of Enrique Dussel. University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
     
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  40.  64
    Feminist philosophy of humor.Amy Marvin - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (7):e12858.
    Over the past decades humor studies has formed an unprecedented interdisciplinary consolidation, connected with a consolidation in philosophy of humor scholarship. In this essay, I focus specifically on feminist philosophy of humor as an area of study that highlights relationships between humor, language, subjectivity, power, embodiment, instability, affect, and resistance, introducing several of its key themes while mapping out tensions that can be productive for further research. I first cover feminist theories of humor as instability and then move to feminist (...)
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  41. Dirāsāt falsafīyah muhdāh ilá al-Duktūr Ibrāhīm Madkūr.ʻUthmān Amīn & Ibrāhīm Madkūr (eds.) - 1974 - [al-Qāhirah]: al-Hayʹah al-Miṣrīyah al-ʻĀmmah lil-Kitāb.
  42. Lamaḥāt min al-fikr al-Firansī.ʻUthmān Amīn - 1970
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  43. Mafhūm-i asāsī-i falsafah.Ḥamīd Ḥamīd - 1969 - [Tehran?]: Intishārāt-i Gawhar.
     
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  44.  7
    ‘New Fatherhood’ and the Politics of Dependency.Amy Shuffelton - 2014-10-27 - In Morwenna Griffiths, Marit Honerød Hoveid, Sharon Todd & Christine Winter (eds.), Re‐Imagining Relationships in Education. Wiley. pp. 38–55.
    To the conversation about relationships in education, this chapter contributes an exploration of the devaluation of dependency in the ′new fatherhood′ discourses that purport to reinvent familial relationships. Although ‘new fatherhood’ seems to promise a reconstruction of the domesticity paradigm that has positioned fathers as breadwinners and mothers as caretakers, it maintains the notion that families are self‐supporting entities and neglects the extensive interdependence involved in raising children. As a result, it cannot successfully overturn this paradigm and hampers our ability (...)
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  45.  14
    Decolonizing ethics: the critical theory of Enrique Dussel.Amy Allen & Eduardo Mendieta (eds.) - 2021 - University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
    A collection of essays on the work of Latin American philosopher Enrique Dussel, focusing on his ethics of liberation.
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  46.  8
    Question market: relevant, informative, and thought-provoking answers to contemporary questions on Jewish law, customs, and ethics.Avraham Zuroff & Reuven Subar (eds.) - 2008 - Nanuet, NY: Feldheim Publishers.
    Vol. 1. Contemporary issues -- Jewish philosophy -- Prayer -- Shabbat and festivals -- What we eat -- A question of ethics -- Lifecycles.
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  47.  12
    Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich.Amy Laura Hall - 2018 - Duke University Press.
    Laughing at the Devil is an invitation to see the world with a medieval visionary now known as Julian of Norwich, believed to be the first woman to have written a book in English. (We do not know her given name, because she became known by the name of a church that became her home.) Julian “saw our Lord scorn [the Devil's] wickedness” and noted that “he wants us to do the same.” In this impassioned, analytic, and irreverent book, Amy (...)
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  48. Democratic disagreement.Amy Gutmann & Dennis Thompson - 1999 - In Stephen Macedo (ed.), Deliberative Politics: Essays on Democracy and Disagreement. Oxford University Press. pp. 243.
  49.  21
    ‘No single way takes us to our different futures’: An interview with Liz Jackson.Amy N. Sojot & Liz Jackson - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (9):1048-1056.
    Liz Jackson is Professor of Education and Head of Department of International Education at the Education University of Hong Kong. Liz served as the President of the Philosophy of Education Society...
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  50. Muḥāwalāt falsafīyah.ʻUthmān Amīn - 1953
     
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