Results for 'Amy Sue Bix'

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  1.  9
    Patricia Fara, A Lab of One's Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. Xiii + 319. ISBN 978-0-19-879-498-1. £18.99[REVIEW]Amy Sue Bix - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (1):171-173.
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  2.  5
    The Rhetoric of Eugenics in Anglo-American Thought. Marouf A. Hasian, Jr.Amy Sue Bix - 1997 - Isis 88 (1):163-164.
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  3. Robert Friedel. A Culture of Improvement: Technology and the Western Millennium. Xi + 588 Pp., Figs., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2007. $39.95[REVIEW]Amy Sue Bix - 2010 - Isis 101 (4):852-854.
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  4.  16
    Amy Sue Bix. Girls Coming to Tech! A History of American Engineering Education for Women. Xii + 360 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2013. $34[REVIEW]Amy E. Foster - 2015 - Isis 106 (1):207-208.
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  5.  2
    Amy Sue Bix. Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs? Americas Debate Over Technological Unemployment, 19291981. Xii+376 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. $45[REVIEW]David W. Noble - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):701-702.
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  6. Law, Language, and Legal Determinacy.Brian Bix - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This book discusses one of the central problems in the philosophy of law--the question of legal determinacy. Is the law a seamless web or are there (...)gaps? Bix argues that the major re-thinking of the common and "common sense" views about law that have been proposed by various recent legal theories is unnecessary. He offers a reconsideration of the role of language in the law, and the way ideas about language have been used and misused in recent legal theory. He explores in depth the relationship to legal theory of Hart's influential idea of "open texture," Dworkin's interpretative approach to law, and Wittgenstein's philosophy. (shrink)
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  7.  16
    Du temps social aux temps sociaux.Roger Sue - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Extrait de R. Sue, Temps et ordre social. Sociologie des temps sociaux, Paris, PUF, 1994, p. 28-32. Nous remercions Roger Sue de nous avoir autorisé à (...)reproduire ici ce texte. Il faut renoncer à faire une sociologie du temps en général. Renoncement difficile pour le sociologue toujours enclin à penser la société sous forme d'unité. Unité qui produirait son propre temps, un temps unique, le temps de la société. Cette illusion de l'unité est extrêmement forte lorsqu'il s'agit du temps, en raison de la (...) - SociologieNouvel article. (shrink)
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  8.  40
    Raz on Necessity.Brian H. Bix - 2003 - Law and Philosophy 22 (6):537 - 559.
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  9. Legal Positivism and 'Explaining' Normativity and Authority.Brian Bix - 2006 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter 5 (2 (Spring 2006)):5-9.
    It has become increasingly common for legal positivist theorists to claim that the primary objective of legal theory in general, and legal positivism in particular, is " (...)explaining normativity." The phrase "explaining normativity" can be understood either ambitiously or more modestly. The more modest meaning is an analytical exploration of what is meant by legal or moral obligation, or by the authority claims of legal officials. When the term is understood ambitiously - as meaning an explanation of how conventional and other empirical facts can give rise to moral obligations - as many legal positivist theorists seem to be using the phrase, the project is contrary to basic tenets of legal positivism, and has regularly led theorists to propose doubtful theories that ignore "is"/"ought" divisions. (shrink)
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  10. H. L. A. Hart and the "Open Texture" of Language.Brian Bix - 1991 - Law and Philosophy 10 (1):51 - 72.
    H. L. A. Hart and the "Open Texture" of Language tries to clarify the writings of both Hart and Friedrich Waismann on "open texture". (...)In Waismann's work, "open texture" referred to the potential vagueness of words under extreme (hypothetical) circumstances. Hart's use of the term was quite different, and his work has been misunderstood because those differences were underestimated. Hart should not be read as basing his argument for judicial discretion on the nature of language; primarily, he was putting forward a policy argument for why rules should be applied in a way which would require that discretion. (shrink)
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  11. Radbruch's Formula and Conceptual Analysis.Brian Bix - 2011 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 56 (1):45-57.
  12. Defeasibility and Open Texture.Brian H. Bix - 2012 - In Jordi Ferrer Beltrán & Giovanni Battista Ratti (eds.), The Logic of Legal Requirements: Essays on Defeasibility. Oxford University Press.
  13.  57
    Contracts.Brian Bix - 2010 - In Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (eds.), The Ethics of Consent: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press.
    Consent, in terms of voluntary choice, is - or, at least, appears to be or purports to be - at the essence of contract law. Contract law, both (...)in principle and in practice, is about allowing parties to enter arrangements on terms they choose - each party imposing obligations on itself in return for obligations another party has placed upon itself. This freedom of contract- an ideal by which there are obligations to the extent, but only to the extent, freely chosen by the parties - is contrasted to the duties of criminal law and tort law, which bind all parties regardless of consent. At the same time, consent, in the robust sense expressed by the ideal of freedom of contract, is arguably absent in the vast majority of the contracts we enter these days, but its absence does little to affect the enforceability of those agreements. Consent to contractual terms often looks like consent to government: present, if at all, only under a fictional (as if) or attenuated rubric. This article explores a variety of topics relating to consent, and the role it plays in contract law doctrine and theory. The article begins by a brief examination of the nature of consent, then turns to contract doctrines that turn on the alleged absence of consent (e.g., duress and undue influence); contract rules and principles (e.g., implied terms) that turn on hypothetical consent; the challenges to consent that arise from electronic contracting and bounded rationality, and theories of contract law that emphasize consent. (shrink)
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  14.  64
    Legal Positivism.Brian H. Bix - 2005 - In Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
  15.  72
    Can Theories of Meaning and Reference Solve the Problem of Legal Determinacy?Brian Bix - 2003 - Ratio Juris 16 (3):281-295.
    A number of important legal theorists have recently argued for metaphysically realist approaches to legal determinacy grounded in particular semantic theories or theories of reference, in particular, (...)
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  16. Natural Law Theory.Brian Bix - 2010 - In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, 2nd ed. Blackwell.
  17. Constitutions, Originalism, and Meaning.Brian H. Bix - 2011 - In Grant Huscroft & Bradley W. Miller (eds.), The Challenge of Originalism: Essays in Constitutional Theory. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  18.  15
    Global Error and Legal Truth.Brian H. Bix - 2009 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (3):535-547.
    One standard criterion for there being objectivity in an area of discourse is that there is conceptual space between what someone thinks to be the case and (...)
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  19.  38
    A Dictionary of Legal Theory.Brian Bix - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Modern legal theory contains a wide range of approaches and topics: from economic analysis of law to feminist legal theory to traditional analytical legal philosophy to a (...)
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  20.  21
    Form and Formalism: The View From Legal Theory.Brian Bix - 2007 - Ratio Juris 20 (1):45-55.
  21.  91
    Will Versus Reason: Truth in Natural Law, Positive Law, and Legal Theory.Brian Bix - 2010 - In Kurt Pritzl (ed.), Truth: Studies of a Robust Presence. Catholic University of America Press.
    This article is based on a Lecture given as part of the Franklin J. Matchette Foundation Lecture Series on Truth at the Catholic University of America, School (...)
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  22.  60
    Law and Language: How Words Mislead Us.Brian H. Bix - 2010 - Jurisprudence 1 (1):25-38.
    Our world is full of fictional devices that let people feel better about their situation - through deception and self-deception. The legal realist, Felix Cohen, argued that (...)
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  23.  59
    Contract Rights and Remedies, and the Divergence Between Law and Morality.Brian H. Bix - 2008 - Ratio Juris 21 (2):194-211.
    There is an ongoing debate in the philosophical and jurisprudential literature regarding the nature and possibility of Contract theory. On one hand are those who argue (or (...)
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  24.  50
    Legal Philosophy in America.Brian Bix - 2008 - In Cheryl Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This article, written for the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy, offers an overview of the most important American contributions to legal philosophy - American legal realism, law (...) and economics, various critical schools of jurisprudence, Lon Fuller, and Ronald Dworkin - while speculating on what might be distinctive of American legal philosophy. One obvious recurring theme is a focus on practical application in general, and adjudication (especially constitutional adjudication) in particular. (shrink)
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  25.  50
    On Philosophy in American Law : Analytical Legal Philosophy.Brian Bix - 2009 - In Francis J. Mootz & William S. Boyd (eds.), On Philosophy in American Law. Cambridge University Press.
    This short article was written for a collection on American legal philosophy today. It gives a brief overview of analytical legal philosophy, and speculates on why this (...)
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  26.  29
    John Austin.Brian Bix - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  27.  11
    Review of Howard Schweber, The Language of Liberal Constitutionalism[REVIEW]Brian Bix - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).
  28.  14
    Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression? - by Larry Alexander[REVIEW]Brian Bix - 2007 - Philosophical Books 48 (3):285-286.
  29.  10
    A. D. Woozley and the Concept of Right Answers in Law.Brian Bix - 1992 - Ratio Juris 5 (1):58-66.
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  30.  4
    Philosophy of Law[REVIEW]B. Bix - 2005 - Philosophical Books 46 (1):93-96.
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  31.  7
    Book Reviews[REVIEW]Brian Bix - 1993 - Mind 102 (405):193-195.
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  32.  55
    Analyzing Law: New Essays in Legal Theory.Brian Bix (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    Analyzing Law offers an important selection of the most influential and challenging work now being done in legal theory. A central focus of the essays in this (...)
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  33. Jurisprudence: Theory and Context, 5th Ed.Brian Bix - 2009 - Sweet & Maxwell (UK) and Carolina Academic Press (US).
     
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  34.  46
    Philosophy of Law.Brian Bix (ed.) - 2006 - Routledge.
    Edited by a leading scholar in the field, Philosophy of Law is a new title in the Routledge Major Works series Critical Concepts in Philosophy . It is (...) a four-volume collection of canonical and cutting-edge research and covers a significant range of topics in the field. The first two volumes of the collection are devoted primarily to analytical legal theoryin particular, theories about the nature of law. This is the idea of legal philosophy most familiar to jurisprudential students in the English-speaking world, and many of the civil-law countries. The last two volumes sample schools and theorists who mostly come from outside the analytical tradition, and who are, in one sense or another, critical theoriststheorists more interested in offering systematic critiques of law or general prescriptions. The four volumes of the collection are divided into six parts. Part one brings together key work on the methodology of analytical philosophy and Part two collects the most important scholarship on forms of legal positivism, including material in the AustinHart tradition, ‘inclusive vs. exclusive legal positivismand Kelsenian legal positivism. Part three (‘Critics of Legal Positivism’) gathers material in the natural-law tradition; the work and influence of Lon Fuller and Ronald Dworkin are also fully explored here. Parts four to six are an assembly of the best and most important thinking by and about normative and critical theorists working outside the analytical tradition. Part four gathers material under the rubric of legal realism, exploring both the American and Scandinavian schools as well as their predecessors. Part five examines one of the most influential movements in modern legal theory and legal practice: known aslaw and economicsor theeconomic analysis of law’, this approach has come to dominate American scholarship, and its role is growing in other countries too. Finally, part six makes available key research on a variety of critical theories of law that have grown up around systematic critiques of Western legal systems. Included here is work by the American legal realists, as well as work by feminists and scholars pursuing critical race theory. The intersection of law and literature is also examined, as are other approaches to law and legal theory: Habermassproceduralist paradigm’; the concept ofautopoiesis’; and the work of Rorty and Fish. This Routledge Major Work illustrates the many ways in which philosophical methods and theories have been used to explore aspects of law and legal practice, and with a comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which places the collected material in its historical and intellectual context, Philosophy of Law is an essential collection destined to be valued by scholars and students as a vital research resource. (shrink)
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  35. Reductionism and Explanation in Legal Theory.Brian Bix - 2006 - In J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.), Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.
  36. Practical Methods for Improving the Welfare of Horses, Donkeys, and Other Working Draught Animals in Developing Areas.R. Heleski Camie, K. McLean Amy & C. Swanson Janice - 2010 - In Temple Grandin (ed.), Improving Animal Welfare: A Practical Approach. Cab International.
     
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  37. Flexibility in the Development of Action.E. Adolph Karen, S. Joh Amy, M. Franchak John, Simone Shaziela Ishak & V. Gill - 2009 - In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
     
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  38.  10
    Selbsterkenntnis Im Charmides: Ihre Epistemologische Und Ethische Komponente Im Zusammenhang Mit der Entwicklung der Philosophie Platons.Young-Sik Sue - 2006 - Königshausen & Neumann.
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  39.  14
    The Limits of Amy Allen's Analysis of Gender Subordination in The Politics of Our Selves.Yara Frateschi - 2018 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 63 (1):341.
    Neste artigo, argumento que a abordagem de Amy Allen a respeito da questão de gênero em The Politics of Our Selves é precária e parcial na medida (...)
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  40.  4
    Guest Editors'Introduction: Jonathan Kozol's Savage Inequalities: A Fifteen-Year Reconsideration.Sue Books & Amy McAninch - 2006 - Educational Studies 40 (1):3-5.
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  41.  27
    The Contemporary Frankfurt School's Eurocentrism Unveiled: The Contribution of Amy Allen.Claudia Leeb, Robert Nichols, Yves Winter & Amy Allen - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):772-800.
    I review Amy Allen's Book: The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory (2016) as part of a Review Symposium: -/- In her latest (...)
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  42.  44
    Pamela Sue Anderson: Re-Visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness[REVIEW]Elizabeth D. Burns - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (2):187-189.
  43.  39
    Book Review: Amy Allen. The Power of Feminist Theory. Boulder: Westview Press, 1999[REVIEW]Jana Sawicki - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):222-226.
  44.  75
    Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in AmericaBy Amy L. Fairchild, Ronald Bayer, and James Colgrove[REVIEW]Alan Rubel - 2009 - Review of Policy Research 26:633-634.
    Review of Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in AmericaBy Amy L. Fairchild, Ronald Bayer, and James Colgrove.
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  45.  12
    Re-Envisioning Critical Theory: Amy Allens The Politics of Our Selves.Nikolas Kompridis - 2014 - Critical Horizons 15 (1):1-13.
    In this paper I question Amy Allens reliance on a Habermasian model of critique and normativity, beyond which her own work points. I emphasize those places (...)in Allens book, The Power of Our Selves, where she could set out on a different path, more consistent with the implications of her critique of Habermas, and more congenial with my own reformulation of the project of critical theory. (shrink)
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  46.  14
    Response to Amy Olberding, "Philosophical Exclusion and Conversational Practices".Schliesser Eric - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (4):1038-1044.
    A full third of the book is devoted to "Buddhist themes," and although I am unfortunately unqualified to comment on its exegetical and interpretative quality, I can (...)
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  47.  7
    From Amy Allen to Abbé Raynal: Critical Theory, the Enlightenment and Colonialism.Matthew Sharpe - 2019 - Critical Horizons 20 (2):178-199.
    ABSTRACTThis paper is a critical response to Amy Allens The End of Progress: Decolonising the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory. We take up her books call (...) for aproblematizinghistory which challengestaken-for-grantedpreconceptions in order to contest Allens own representation of the thought of the enlightenment. Allen accepts that all the enlighteners agreed upon a stadial, progressive account of history, which she critiques epistemically and normatively. But we show in Part 2, drawing on the work of Henri Vyverberg and other historians of eighteenth century ideas, that a cyclical, rise and fall account of historical succession was more prominent than the progressive narrative in leading enlighteners such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, DAlembert, Condillac, Jancourt, Grimm, and Raynal, all of whom Allen does not mention. In Part 3, we show that not all thinkers of the enlightenment were pro-colonial or pro-imperialist, as Allen also presupposes in The End of Progress. By examining Abbé Raynals History of The Two Indies in Part 3, and notably its Diderotian interpolations, we show that many enlighteners propounded fierce criticisms of European colonialism and the slave trade, even calling directly for armed resistance against European infractions. In critical theoristssearch for chastened normative foundations, our concluding remarks contend, there is a need to develop more accurate, balanced, post-postmodern reckonings of the enlightenment. (shrink)
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  48.  18
    Liberating Critical Theory: Eurocentrism, Normativity, and Capitalism: Symposium on Amy Allens The End of Progress: Decolonizing the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory, Columbia University Press, 2016.Claudia Leeb, Robert Nichols, Yves Winter & Amy Allen - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):772-800.
  49.  25
    Emancipation, Progress, Critique: Debating Amy Allens The End of Progress.Albena Azmanova, Martin Saar, Guilel Treiber, Azar Dakwar, Noëlle McAfee, Andrew Feenberg & Amy Allen - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (4):511-541.
  50.  47
    The Ethics of Ecstasy: Georges Bataille and Amy Hollywood on Mysticism, Morality, and Violence.Stephen S. Bush - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):299-320.
    Georges Bataille agrees with numerous Christian mystics that there is ethical and religious value in meditating upon, and having ecstatic episodes in response to, imagery of violent (...)
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