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Amy E. White [7]Amy White [5]Amy Leigh White [1]
  1.  61
    Body Integrity Identity Disorder Beyond Amputation: Consent and Liberty.Amy White - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (3):225-236.
    In this article, I argue that persons suffering from Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) can give informed consent to surgical measures designed to treat this disorder. This is true even if the surgery seems radical or irrational to most people. The decision to have surgery made by a BIID patient is not necessarily coerced, incompetent or uninformed. If surgery for BIID is offered, there should certainly be a screening process in place to insure informed consent. It is beyond the scope (...)
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  2.  24
    The Morality of an Internet Market in Human Ova.Amy E. White - 2006 - Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):311-321.
  3.  34
    Book Review. [REVIEW]Amy White - 2007 - Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (1):127-129.
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  4.  42
    Dave Monroe, Ed.Porn: How to Think with Kink: Chichester, England: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, 262 Pp. ISBN 978-1405199629 $19.95 Pb. [REVIEW]Amy E. White - 2011 - Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (4):491-492.
  5.  6
    Manon Garcia: We Are Not Born Submissive.Amy E. White - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-4.
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  6.  81
    Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. [REVIEW]Amy E. White - 2010 - Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (3):413-423.
  7.  65
    The Impact of the Internet on Our Moral Lives.Amy E. White - 2005 - Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3-4):537-539.
  8.  16
    The Immorality of the ten Commandments.Amy White - 2010 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 18 (1):57-70.
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  9.  46
    The Lie of Fmri: An Examination of the Ethics of a Market in Lie Detection Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. [REVIEW]Amy E. White - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (3):253-266.
    In this paper, I argue that companies who use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans for lie detection encounter the same basic ethical stumbling blocks as commercial companies that market traditional polygraphs. Markets in traditional voluntary polygraphs are common and fail to elicit much uproar among ethicists. Thus, for consistency, if markets in polygraphs are ethically unproblematic, markets using fMRIs for lie detection are equally as acceptable. Furthermore, while I acknowledge two substantial differences between the ethical concerns involving polygraphs and (...)
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