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  1.  11
    Stem Cell Tourism and Doctors' Duties to Minors—A View From Canada.Amy Zarzeczny & Timothy Caulfield - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):3-15.
    While the clinical promise of much stem cell research remains largely theoretical, patients are nonetheless pursuing unproven stem cell therapies in jurisdictions around the world?a phenomenon referred to as ?stem cell tourism.? These treatments are generally advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis via the Internet. Research shows portrayals of stem cell medicine on such websites are overly optimistic and the claims made are unsubstantiated by published evidence. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that parents are pursing these ?treatments? for their children, despite potential (...)
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  2.  16
    Defining ‘Medical Necessity’ in an Age of Personalised Medicine: A View From Canada.Timothy Caulfield & Amy Zarzeczny - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (9):813-817.
  3.  9
    What's Missing? Discussing Stem Cell Translational Research in Educational Information on Stem Cell “Tourism”.Zubin Master, Amy Zarzeczny, Christen Rachul & Timothy Caulfield - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):254-268.
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  4.  12
    What's Missing? Discussing Stem Cell Translational Research in Educational Information on Stem Cell “Tourism”.Zubin Master, Amy Zarzeczny, Christen Rachul & Timothy Caulfield - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):254-268.
    Stem cell tourism is a growing industry in which patients pursue unproven stem cell therapies for a wide variety of illnesses and conditions. It is a challenging market to regulate due to a number of factors including its international, online, direct-to-consumer approach. Calls to provide education and information to patients, their families, physicians, and the general public about the risks associated with stem cell tourism are mounting. Initial studies examining the perceptions of patients who have pursued stem cell tourism indicate (...)
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  5.  14
    “Media, Politics and Science Policy: MS and Evidence From the CCSVI Trenches”. [REVIEW]Daryl Pullman, Amy Zarzeczny & André Picard - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundIn 2009, Dr. Paolo Zamboni proposed chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) as a possible cause of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although his theory and the associated treatment (“liberation therapy”) received little more than passing interest in the international scientific and medical communities, his ideas became the source of tremendous public and political tension in Canada. The story moved rapidly from mainstream media to social networking sites. CCSVI and liberation therapy swiftly garnered support among patients and triggered remarkable and relentless advocacy efforts. (...)
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    Unproven Stem Cell-Based Interventions & Physicians’ Professional Obligations; a Qualitative Study with Medical Regulatory Authorities in Canada.Amy Zarzeczny & Marianne Clark - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):75.
    The pursuit of unproven stem cell-based interventions is an emerging issue that raises various concerns. Physicians play different roles in this market, many of which engage their legal, ethical and professional obligations. In Canada, physicians are members of a self-regulated profession and their professional regulatory bodies are responsible for regulating the practice of medicine and protecting the public interest. They also provide policy guidance to their members and discipline members for unprofessional conduct.
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